Chapter 67

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

Chapter 66     Chapter 68     Index to All the Chapters     Taoism     Cloud Hands Blog

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Chapter 67

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Three Precious Things: Gentleness, Compassion, Love (tz'u); Mercy, Tao, Economy, Thriftiness, Patience, Liberality, Benevolence, Generosity, Humility, Three Precious Values: Compassion, Economy, Frugality
(chien); Modesty, Dao, Three Treasures (pao), Moderation, Bravery, Untimely, Death, Failure, Three Virtues, Economic, Victory, Gentle, Useless (pu hsiao), Strength, Heaven, Leadership,  三寶  

Términos en Español:  Tres Csas Preciosas: Dulzura, Compasión, Amor; Economía, Frugalidad, Paciencia, Liberalidad, Benevolencia, Generosidad, Humildad, Tres Valores Preciosos: Compasión, Economía, Frugalidad; Modestia, Tres Tesoros, Moderación, Valentía, Destiempo, Muerte, Fracaso, Tres Virtudes, Económico, Victoria, Suave, Inútil, Fuerza, Cielo, Liderazgo

 

 

"All in the world call me great; but I resemble the unlikely.
Now a man is great only because he resembles the unlikely.
Did he resemble the likely, how lasting, indeed, would his mediocrity be!
I have three treasures which I cherish and prize.
The first is called compassion.
The second is called economy.
The third is called not daring to come to the front in the world. 
The compassionate can be brave;
The economical can be generous;
Those who dare not come to the front in the world can become perfect as chief vessels.
Now, if people discard compassion and are brave;
If they discard economy and are generous;
If they discard modesty and are ambitious, they will surely die."
-  Translated by D. T. Suzuki and Paul Carus, 1913, Chapter 67  

 

 

"All the world says that, while my Tao is great, it yet appears to be inferior to other systems of teaching.
Now it is just its greatness that makes it seem to be inferior.
If it were like any other system, for long would its smallness have been known!
But I have three precious things which I prize and hold fast.
The first is gentleness; the second is economy; and the third is shrinking from taking precedence of others.
With that gentleness I can be bold;
With that economy I can be liberal;
Shrinking from taking precedence of others, I can become avessel of the highest honor.
Now-a-days they give up gentleness and are all for being bold;
Economy, and are all for being liberal;
The hindmost place, and seek only to be foremost;
Which in the end is death. 
Gentleness is sure to be victorious even in battle, and firmly to maintain its ground.
Heaven will save its possessor, by his very gentleness protecting him."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 67 

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"In the world each says
My Tao is great and seems to lack resemblance
In the end only great therefore seems to lack resemblance.
It looks like resemblance goes with the long-lasting
With what is tiny as well.
In the end I possess three principles I am obtaining yet defending
One, say compassion
Two, say thrift
Three say lack of venturing to act to precede the world.
Compassion, so be able to be brave
Thrift, so be able to expand
Lack venturing to act to precede the world
So be able to perfect tools of growth.
Right now, abandon compassion just to be brave
Abandon thrift just to expand
Abandon being behind just to precede
Death goes with these.
In the end with compassion
A war happens and next comes conquering
Keeping to it happens and next comes solidity.
The heavens attain helping
It happens that compassion is defending."
-  Translated by David Lindauer, Chapter 67

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"Everyone, says that my Tao is great,
seemingly different (from yours).
Because it is great, it seems different.
If it were not different,
it would have vanished long ago.
I have three treasures which I hold and keep.
The first is mercy;
the second is economy (thrifty);
the third is daring not to be ahead of others (which draws jealousy).
From mercy comes courage;
from economy comes generosity;
staying behind ensures maturity and fulfillment.
Nowadays men shun mercy and be brave;
abandon economy and be wasteful;
do not believe in humility, but always try to be the first.
This ensures death.
Mercy brings victory in battle and strength in defense.
If God wants to save him, makes him have mercy." 
-  Translated by Tienzen Gong, Chapter 67 

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  
Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Be Enlightened! A Guidebook to the Tao Te Ching and Taoist Meditation: Your Six-Month Journey to Spiritual Enlightenment   By Wes Burgess
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

 

                             

 

 

 

"The Tao may appear to be idealistic, but if you can put it into practice, you realize its greatness.
There are three traits which are required. 1. Compassion. 2. Patience. 3. Humility
Compassionate and you can face things the way they are.
Thus you can forgive yourself of any mistake.
Patient and you remain unmoved until the right opportunity arises.
Humble and you overcome self-importance, thus the ego.
In following the Tao, these are your three most valuable treasures."
-  Translated by David Bullen, Chapter 67 

 

 

天下皆謂我道大似不肖.
夫唯大, 故似不肖.
若肖, 久矣其細也夫.
我有三寶.
持而保之.
一曰慈.
二曰儉.
三曰不敢為天下先.
慈故能勇.
儉故能廣.
不敢為天下先.
故能成器長.
今舍慈且勇.
舍儉且廣. 
舍後且先.
死矣.
夫慈以戰則勝. 
以守則固.
天將救之.
以慈衛之.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 67 

 

 

t'ien hsia chieh wei wo tao ta ssu pu hsiao.
fu wei ta, ku ssu pu hsiao.
jo hsuao, chiu yi ch'i hsi yeh fu.
wo yu san pao.
ch'ih erh pao chih.
yi yüeh tz'u.
erh yüeh chien.
san yüeh pu kan wei t'ien hsia hsien.
tz'u ku nêng yung.
chien ku nêng kuang.
pu kan wei t'ien hsia hsien. 
ku nêng ch'êng ch'i ch'ang.
chin shê tz'u ch'ieh yung.
shê chien ch'ieh kuang. 
shê hou ch'ieh hsien.
ssu yi.
fu tz'u yi chan tsê shêng.
yi shou tsê ku.
t'ien chiang chiu chih.
yi tz'u wei chih.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 67

 

 

Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 67 of the Tao Te Ching

 

 

tian xia jie wei wo dao da si bu xiao.
fu wei da, gu si bu xiao.
ruo xiao, jiu yi qi xi ye fu.
wo you san bao.
chi er bao zhi.  
yi yue ci.
er yue jian.
san yue bu gan wei tian xia xian.
ci gu neng yong.
jian gu neng guang.
bu gan wei tian xia xian.
gu neng cheng qi zhang.
jin she ci qie yong.
she jian qie guang.
she hou qie xian.
si yi.
fu ci yi zhan ze sheng.
yi shou ze gu.
tian jiang jiu zhi.
yi ci wei zhi.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 67  

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Google Translator

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"Compassion, frugality and ruling ... 
Everywhere, they say the Way, our doctrine,
Is so very like detested folly;
But greatness of its own alone explains
Why it should be thus held beyond the pale.
If it were only orthodox, long since
It would have seemed a small and petty thing! 
I have to keep three treasures well secured:
The first, compassion; next, frugality;
And third, I say that never would I once
Presume that I should be the whole world's chief. 
Given compassion, I can take courage;
Given frugality, I can abound;
If I can be the world's most humble man,
Then I can be its highest instrument. 
Bravery today knows no compassion;
Abundance is, without frugality,
And eminence without humility:
This is the death indeed of all our hope. 
In battle, 'tis compassion wins the day;
Defending, tis compassion that is firm:
Compassion arms the people God would save!"
-  Translated by Raymond Blakney, 1955, Chapter 67   

 

 

 
Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"The world calls my Tao great but myself insignificant.
Yes: the clearer Tao manifests the more meaningless the ego becomes.
Worth nothing and without duration is he who wants to rate and be of importance.
Three treasures I guard which endure: the first is compassion the second frugality the third modesty.
Compassion makes me brave frugality generous modesty a carrier of the eternal.
Today the inconsiderate is called brave the spendthrift generous the go-getter progressive. 
They are progressing away from the essential thing toward decay toward death while the compassionate conquer through gentleness remaining in existence through non-resistance.
Heaven fills with compassion those it wants to preserve."
-  Translated by Schmidt, Chapter 67

 

 

"The inhabitants of the world all say that I am greatly tolerant, although I have the appearance of incompetence.
This apparent incompetence is the result of my very greatness.
In the case of one who is possessed of more than ordinary ability, he sets his mind constantly upon even the smallest matters. 
Now there are three things which I regard as precious, which I grasp and prize. 
The first is compassion; the second is frugality; the third is not venturing to take precedence of others modesty. 
I prize compassion; therefore I am able to be fearless.
I prize frugality; therefore I am able to be liberal.
I prize modesty; therefore I am able to become a leader of men.
But men of the present day abandon compassion, yet aim at valiancy;
they abandon frugality, yet aim at being liberal;
they abandon modesty, yet aim at leadership.
This is death to them. 
Now when one is compassionate in battle, he will be victorious.
When one is compassionate in defending, his defenses will be strong.
When Heaven intends to deliver men, it employs compassion to protect them."
-  Translated by Frederic Henry Balfour, 1884, Chapter 67

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"Everyone under Heaven regards my Tao as Great, resembling nothing else.
Great, yes; that is the reason it resembles nothing else.
If it resembled anything else, it would have slight chance of survival.
I have three Treasures to hold and protect.
The first is Compassion.
The second is Economy.
The third is not presuming to be the First under Heaven.
Compassion permits Courage.
Economy makes Generosity possible.
Not presuming to be the First under Heaven is a quality of Leadership.
Now, abandon Compassion and consider Courage.
Abandon Frugality and consider Generosity.
Abandon Humility and consider Leadership.
Impossible !
Now, Compassion in battle leads to Victory; Compassion in Defense lends strength.
Heaven will assist the commander who exhibits Compassion."
-  Translated by Karl Kromal, 2002, Chapter 67 

 

 

"Everyone says my Dao is so great that it does not look like anything.
I say because it is so great, it does not look like anything.
If it were like anything, it would have disappeared long ago.
I have three treasures to keep and protect:
The first is kindness, the second is thrift, and the third is not fighting to be first.
Only if you are kind, can you be brave;
Only if you are thrifty, can you be generous;
Only if you do not fight to be first, can you be a leader.
However, the people today are not kind but brave,
Are not thrifty but generous,
Are not humble but want to be leaders.
These people are destined for failure.
With kindness, when you fight, you will win; when you defend, you will be strong.
If the heavens wants to save someone, it will always give him kindness as his defense."
-  Translated by Xiaolin Yang, Chapter 67 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"Tao is Great and do not have equals or similar to It!
It resides so deeply and is so subtle that one cannot catch It or force It to do something!
I possess three treasures valuable to me: the first is benevolence, the second is frugality, and the third is that I do not stand ahead of others.
I am benevolent, thus I can be brave.
I am frugal, thus I can generous.
I do not stand ahead of others, thus I can be a wise leader.
He who is brave without love, generous without frugality, who tries to be ahead of others and pushes others away — such a person suffers failure.
One of the contrary, he who is full of love achieves victory.
And he is unconquerable because Tao constantly guards him."
-  Translated by Mikhail Nikolenko, Chapter 67 

 

 

"The whole world calls my Way vast
And says it resembles nothing else.
It is precisely because it is vast
That it resembles nothing else.
If it resembled something else
How could it be anything but small?
I have three treasures
I hold to and cherish.
The first is compassion,
The second is moderation,
The third is called not rashly
Taking the lead in the realm.
Being compassionate I can show courage,
Being moderate I can be generous,
Not rashly taking the lead
I can command the officials.
Courage without compassion,
Generosity without moderation,
Going in front instead of behind,
Is certain to end in destruction.
With compassion you will win in war
And be impregnable in peace.
Heaven will protect you
With the gift of compassion."
-  Translated by A. S. Kline, 2003, Chapter 67 

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

 

                                     

 

 

 

"In the world many call me great, yet I seem to have no intelligence.
The Master indeed is great, yet he also seems to have no intelligence.
As regards our intelligence, its smallness is of long continuance.
The Master and I have three treasures,
We hold them and prize them.
The first is called "Deep Love,"
The second is called "Protectiveness,"
The third is called "Not planning to be first."
Having Deep Love, you then can have courage.
Having Protectiveness, you then can give freely.
Not planning to be first, you will be a perfect instrument that will endure.
Now, men neglect Deep Love and seek courage,
They put aside Protectiveness and see extravagance.
They leave the second place and seek the first, Then death comes.
The Master fights by means of Love, then he conquers.
He keeps guard by means of it, then he is impregnable.
Heaven will save him and Love will defend him."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 67 

 

 

Everyone says: "Nature is great, yet Nature is simple."
It is great because it is simple.
If it were not simple, long ago it would have come to little.
Nature sustains itself through three precious principles, which one does well to embrace and follow. These are gentleness, frugality and humility.
When one is gentle, he has no fear of retaliation.
When one is frugal, he has no fear of retaliation.
When one is humble, no one challenges his leadership.
When rudeness replaces gentleness,
And extravagance replaces frugality, and pride replaces humility,
The one is doomed.
Since a gentle attack arouses little antagonism,
And a gentle defense provokes little anger,
Nature predisposes to gentleness those most suited for survival."
-  Translated by Archie J. Bahm, 1958, Chapter 67  

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   Translated by Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"All the world agrees

That while my Tao is great,

Myself unseemly seems to be,

Like one of low estate.

But because of his unseemliness

Now only is he great,

For long has mediocrity

Had seemliness for mate.

 

Three precious things I hold,

And guard with diligence,

Compassionateness, economy,

And avoiding precedence.

With the first I can be brave,

With the second generous be,

And, while I shrink from precedence,

Hold honor' s high degree.

 

But if they discard compassion,

And are all for bravery,

Economy, and still are all

For generosity,

If they give up the rearmost place,

And in front they strive to be,

Tis death! For compassionateness will give

In battle victory,

And Heaven for sure defense will spread

Compassion's canopy."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 67

 

 

 

 

 


"The world talks about honoring the Tao,
but you can't tell it from their actions.
Because it is thought of as great, the world makes light of it.
It seems too easy for anyone to use.
There are three jewels that I cherish:
compassion, moderation, and humility.
With compassion, you will be able to be brave,
With moderation, you will be able to give to others,
With humility, you will be able to become a great leader.
To abandon compassion while seeking to be brave,
or abandoning moderation while being benevolent,
or abandoning humility while seeking to lead
will only lead to greater trouble.
The compassionate warrior will be the winner,
and if compassion is your defense you will be secure.
Compassion is the protector of Heaven's salvation."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 67  

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"All the world avows that while my Taoism is great, it is yet incompetent!
It is its greatness which makes it appear incompetent.
If it were like others, it would long ago have been recognized as incompetent.
But I hold fast to three precious things, which I also cherish.
The first is gentleness.
The second is economy.
The third is humility.
With such gentleness I can be daring.
With such economy I can be generous.
With such humility I can be great in service, as a vessel of honour.
But in these days men forsake gentleness and become only obtrusive.
They abandon economy and become only excessive.
They relinquish humility and strive for precedence, and thus for death.
Gentleness is ever victorious in attack and secure in defence.
Therefore when Heaven would preserve a man it enfolds him with gentleness."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 67 

 

 

All the world says that my Tao is great and does not seem to resemble the ordinary.
It is precisely because it is great that it does not resemble the ordinary.
If it did resemble, it would have been small for a long time.
I have three treasures. Guard and keep them:
The first is deep love,
The second is frugality,
And the third is not to dare to be ahead of the world.
Because of deep love, one is courageous.
Because of frugality, one is generous.
Because of not daring to be ahead of the world, one becomes the leader of the world.
Now, to be courageous by forsaking deep love,
To be generous by forsaking frugality,
And to be ahead of the world by forsaking following behind.
This is fatal.
For deep love helps one to win in the case of attack,
And to be firm in the case of defense.
When Heaven is to save a person,
Heaven will protect him through deep love."
-  Translated by Wing-Tsit Chan, 1963, Chapter 67  

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

 

"Todo el mundo dice que mi Tao es grande
y no lo parece.
Precisamente porque es grande,
pero no lo parece.
Si lo pareciera hubiera dejado de serlo,
y hace mucho tiempo que sería pequeño.
Tengo Tres Tesoros que guardo con cuidado
y vigilo estrechamente:
el primero es la Compasión,
el segundo es la Moderación,
el tercero es la Humildad.
Por la Compasión puedo ser valeroso.
Por la Moderación puedo ser generoso.
Por la Humildad puedo ser el primero, sin parecerlo.
Los hombres de hoy,
quieren ser valerosos sin ser compasivos,
quieren ser generosos sin moderarse,
quieren ser líderes sin ser humildes,
Pues obviamente esto conlleva a la destrucción.
Quien ataca con Compasión, vence.
Quien se defiende con Compasión, resiste.
Los hombres buscan la Compasión en el Cielo, pero
el Cielo busca la Compasión en los hombres."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Tao Te Ching, Capitulo 67

 

 

"En el mundo todos dicen que soy grande
y no lo parezco.
Porque soy grande
no lo parezco.
Si lo pareciera hubiera dejado de serio,
y hace mucho tiempo que sería pequeño.

Poseo tres tesoros que guardo:
el primero es amor,
el segundo es moderación,
el tercero es humildad.
Por el amor puedo ser valeroso.
Por la moderación puedo ser generoso.
Por la humildad puedo ser el primero.
Pero sin amor no se puede ser valeroso,
sin moderación no se puede ser generoso,
sin humildad no se puede ser el primero.
De otro modo se camina a la muerte.

Quien ataca con amor, vence.
Quien se defiende con amor, es firme.
Quien por el cielo es salvado, le protege el amor."
-  Spanish Version Online at RatMachines, Capitulo 67 


 

 

 

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Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 67

 

Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español


Concordance to the Daodejing 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) and Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version.  From the Dao is Open website. 


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 67 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6 


English Versions of the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu.  Distributed online by Terebess Asia Online (TAO).  Over 40 English translators' versions of the Daodejing.  Each translator's version, all 81 chapters, are consistently and nicely formatted on a single webpage.  The webpage for each translator's version feature white text print on a dark brown-reddish background, a top index table, and with numbered chapters. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 67, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2014. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

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This webpage was last modified or updated on March 31, 2014. 
This webpage was first distributed online on July 9, 2011. 
 

 

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Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides

Cloud Hands Blog

Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

One Old Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

Comments, Feedback, Kudos

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles (1892) and Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanizations

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81