Chapter 54

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

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Chapter 54

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Dao, Observation, Good or Well or Excellent (shan), Person, Family or Home (chia), Rooted or Planted (chien), Cultivate or Practice (hsiu), Person (shen), Village or Town (hsiang), City, State or Country (kuo), Uprooted or Pulled Up (pa), Insight, Grasp or Hold (pao), Intuition, Separated or Escape (t'o), Cease or End (cho), Views, Embracing, Self-Cultivation, Community Efforts, Virtue or Power (Te), Observing the Tao, Goodness, Strength, Lasting or Enduring (ch'ang), Surplus or Excess or Abundance (), Copious or Prolific (fêng), Genuine, Heaven (t'ien), Prosperity, Increase, Benefit, Productive, Future Generations, Children or Sons or Daughters (tzu), Grandchildren (sun), Point of View, Worship or Honor (chi), Sacrifice (ssu), Real or True (chên), Microcosm, Below (hsia), Assess, Growing, Universal or Pervasive or Widespread (p'u), Abundance, Enduring, Examined or Considered or Judged (kuan), What or Why (ho), Know or Understand (chih), Exuberant, As Below So Above,  修觀  


Términos en Español:  Observación, Persona, Familia, Pueblo, Ciudad, Estado, País, Intuición, Cultivo, Vistas, Plantar, Abrazar, Auto-cultivo, Esfuerzos Comunitarios, Virtud, Bondad, Fuerza, Abundancia, Genuino, Prosperidad, Beneficio, Generaciones Productivas, Punto de Vista, Microcosmos, Evaluar, Crecer, Generalizada, Duradera, Exuberante, Como Abajo Es Arriba, Excelente, Arraigada, Plantado, tirado, Agarre, Hold, Separado, Escapar, Bueno, Mantenar, Los niños, Hijos, Hijas, Nietos, Adoración, Honor, Sacrificio, Cesar, Fin, Cultivar, Práctica, Personas, Poder, Cierto, Real, Exceso, Excedentes, Duradero, Copiosa, Prolífico, Cielo, Debajo, Universal, Penetrante, Examinada, Considerado, Juzgado, Hogar, Qué, Por Qué, Conocer, Comprender.

 

 

 

"One who is well established is not uprooted,
One who embraces firmly cannot be separated from,
Thus sons and grandsons shall perform sacrifices without interruptions.
In cultivating this in one's person,
The person's te becomes genuine;
In cultivating this in the family,
The family's te has more to spare (yü);
In cultivating this in the village,
The village's te grows strong;
In cultivating this in the state,
The state's te becomes abundant;
In cultivating this in the world (t'ien hsia),
The world's te becomes universal.
Therefore observe (kuan) the person by the person,
Observe the family by the family,
Observe the village by the village,
Observe the state by the state,
Observe the world by the world.
How do I know such is the case in the world?
Through this."
-  Translated by Ellen M. Chen, 2000, Chapter 54 

 

 

"What is well planted cannot be uprooted.
What is well embraced cannot slip away.
The descendants will carry on the ancestral sacrifice from generation to generation.
Cultivate Virtue in your own person, and it will be genuine.
Cultivate it in the family, and it will be more than sufficient.
Cultivate it in the village, and it will last long.
Cultivate it in the state, and it will flourish abundantly.
Cultivate it in the world, and it will become universal.
Hence, a person must be perceived as person; a family as family; a village as village; a state as state; the world as world.
How do I know about the world?
It is through this."
-  Translated by Tien Cong Tran, Chapter 54

 

 


"What is skillfully rooted and well established cannot effortlessly be uprooted, what is well embraced cannot be easily torn away.
Hold onto the Tao firmly, and you will endure. This will pass on to your children and grandchildren also.
When virtue is cultivated in oneself, it becomes real.
When cultivated in the home, virtue will overflow.
When virtue is cultivated in the community it becomes lasting.
When cultivated in the nation, virtue becomes abundant.
When virtue is cultivated in the world, it becomes the Law of the land, and it leads to universal virtue, all pervading and all encompassing.
Therefore one can see that ones self influences the family.
The family influences the community. The community influences the nation. And the nation influences the world.
Therefore, bring virtue into your own life, and it will spread all about you, into the world.
How do I know this is true? Because I have seen virtue move and live."
-  Translated by John Dicus, 2002, Chapter 54 

 

 

"What is sown by the best sower will never be uprooted,
What is fastened by the best fastener will never be loosened.
And so his children and grandchildren can continue the ancestral ritual for many generations.
If he nurtures the Tao by himself, his virtue is genuine,
If he nurtures the Tao in his family, his virtue is abundant,
If he nurtures the Tao in his village, his virtue is inestimable,
If he nurtures the Tao in his country, his virtue fills the country,
If he nurtures the Tao in the world, his virtue fills the universe.
Therefore, when you observe the individual, know individuals,
When you observe the family, know families,
When you observe the village, know villages,
When you observe the country, know countries,
When you observe the world, know the universe.
How do I know that it is possible to rule the world with the Tao?
From this observation."
-  Translated by Chou-Wing Chohan, Chapter 54

 

 

"Well planted, not uprooted.
Well embraced, never lost.
Descendants will continue The ancestral rituals.
Maintain oneself: Te becomes real.
Maintain the family: Te becomes abundant.
Maintain the community: Te becomes extensive.
Maintain the country: Te becomes public.
Maintain the world: Te becomes omnipresent.
Therefore, Through self contemplate self,
Through family contemplate family,
Through community contemplate community,
Through country contemplate country,
Through world contemplate world.
How do I know the world?
Like this!"
-  Translated by Stephen Addis, 1993, Chapter 54  

 

 

"What is firmly rooted cannot be pulled out;
What is tightly held in the arms will not slip loose;
Through this the offering of sacrifice by descendants will never come to an end.
Cultivate it in your person
And its virtue will be genuine;
Cultivate it in the family
And its virtue will be more than sufficient;
Cultivate it in the hamlet
And its virtue will endure;
Cultivate it in the state
And its virtue will abound;
Cultivate it in the empire
And its virtue will be pervasive.
Hence look at the person through the person;
Look at the family through the family;
Look at the hamlet through the hamlet;
Look at the state through the state;
Look at the empire through the empire.
How do I know that the empire is like that?
By means of this."
-  Translated by D. C. Lau, 1963, Chapter 54 

 

 

"What is well established cannot be uprooted.
What is firmly held cannot slip away.
The power of sacrifice continues on
from generation to generation.

Cultivated in the person, power becomes real.
Cultivated in the family, power becomes abundant.
Cultivated in the community, power endures.
Cultivated in the nation, power flourishes.
Cultivated in the world, power becomes universal.

Therefore see the person as a person,
the family as a family, the community as a community,
the nation as a nation, and the world as universal.
How do I know that the world is like this?
By this."
-  Translated by Sanderson Beck, 1996, Chapter 54

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"What is planted right is not uprooted
what is held right is not ripped away
future generations worship it forever
cultivated in thee self virtue becomes real
cultivated in the family virtue multiplies
cultivated in the village virtue increases
cultivated in the state virtue prospers
cultivated in the world virtue abounds
thus view the self through the self
view the family through the family
view the village through the village
view the state through the state
view the world through the world
how do we know what the world is like through this"
-  Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter), Chapter 54 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"What is firmly implanted cannot be pulled out;
What is firmly embraced cannot be lost.
As a result, the sacrifices of your descendants will never end.
If you cultivate it in your self, your virtue will be pure;
If you cultivate it in your family, your virtue will be overflowing;
If you cultivate it in your village, your virtue will be longlasting;
If you cultivate it in your state, your virtue will be rich and full;
If you cultivate it throughout the world, your virtue will be widespread.
Look at the family from the point of view of the family;
Look at the village from the point of view of the village;
Look at the state from the point of view of the state;
Look at the world from the point of view of the world.
How do I know the condition of the whole world?
By this."
-  Translated by Robert G. Hendricks, Chapter 54 

 

 

"Plant yourself firmly in the Tao and you won't ever be uprooted.
Embrace Tao firmly and you won't ever be separated from it.
Your children will thrive, and your children's children.
Cultivate goodness in your self, and goodness will be genuine.
Cultivate it in your family, and goodness will flourish.
Cultivate it in your community, and goodness will grow and multiply.
Cultivate it in your country, and goodness will be abundant.
Cultivate it in the world, and goodness will be everywhere.
How do I know the world works like this?
By watching."
-  Translated by Brian Browne Walker, 1996, Chapter 54

 

 

"What is perfectly planted will not be uprooted.
What is perfectly held will not slip away.
Through generations the family's memorial service will not be discontinued.
Thus,
by cultivating Dao in a person, virtues become manifest;
by cultivating Dao in a family, virtues become abundant;
by cultivating Dao in the community, virtues become enduring;
by cultivating Dao in a country, virtues become flourishing;
and by cultivating Dao in the world, virtues become universal.
Thus,
by taking care of one's self, one takes care of others;
by taking care of one's family, one takes care of others' families;
by taking care of one's own community, one takes care of others' communities;
by taking care of one's own country, one takes care of others' countries;
and by taking care of the world, one takes care of the universe.
How do we know in what way the world should be ruled?
Through this."
-  Translated by Tang Zi-Chang, Chapter 54

 

 

"What is firmly established cannot be uprooted;
what is tightly embraced cannot slip away.

Thus, the prayers of sons and grandsons will never end!

Cultivated in the person, Dei is true.
Cultivated in the family, Dei is ample.
Cultivated in the village, Dei lasts long.
Cultivated in the state, Dei is abundant.
Cultivated everywhere under heaven, Dei is vast.

Observe other people through your own person.
Observe other families through your own family.
Observe other villages through your own village.
Observe other states through your own state.
Observe all under heaven through all of these.

How do I know the nature of all under heaven? 
By looking!"
-  Translated by Jerry C. Welch, 1998, Chapter 54 

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons


                             

 

 

 

"The man who knows how to establish virtue never fears its being uprooted.
The man who knows how to maintain virtue never fears its escaping him.
The sons and grandsons of such never rest in offering sacrifices to them.
The virtue of him who cultivates Tao in his own person is genuine.
The virtue of him who cultivates it in his own home is superabundant in that he has charity to spare for others.
The virtue of him who cultivates it in his village is enduring.
The virtue of him who cultivates it in his State is exuberant. 
The virtue of him who cultivates it in the Empire is universal.
Wherefore I judge the persons of others by my own person;
the families of others by my own family;
the villages of others by my own village;
the States of others by my own State;
the Empire of the ancient kings by the Empire I rule to-day.
How do I know the acquiescence of the world in the cultivation of Tao?
By this method."
-  Translated by Frederic Balfour, 1884, Chapter 54 

 

 

 

A Chinese Language Version of Chapter 54 of the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
A note on my style of displaying the Chinese characters of the Tao Te Ching

 

 

善建者不拔. 
善抱者不脫. 
子孫以祭祀不輟. 
修之於身.
其德乃真.
修之於家.
其德乃餘.
修之於鄉.
其德乃長.
修之於國.
其德乃豐.  
修之於天下.
其德乃普. 
故以身觀身.
以家觀家.
以鄉觀鄉.
以國觀國.
以天下觀天下. 
吾何以知天下然哉.
以此. 

-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 54

 

 

shan chien chê pu pa.
shan pao chê pu t'o.
tzu sun yi chi ssu pu cho. 
hsiu chih yü shên.
ch'i tê nai chên. 
hsiu chih yü chia.
ch'i tê nai yü. 
hsiu chih yü hsiang.
ch'i tê nai ch'ang.
hsiu chih yü kuo. 
ch'i tê nai fêng.
hsiu chih yü t'ien hsia.
ch'i tê nai p'u.
ku yi shên kuan shên. 
yi chia kuan chia.
yi hsiang kuan hsiang.
yi kuo kuan kuo.
yi t'ien hsia kuan t'ien hsia.
wu ho yi chih t'ien hsia jan tsai.
yi tz'u.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 54

 


Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 54 of the Tao Te Ching

 


shan jian zhe bu ba.  
shan bao zhe bu tuo.  
zi sun yi ji si bu chuo.
xiu zhi yu shen.  
qi de nai zhen.  
xiu zhi yu jia.  
qi de nai yu.  
xiu zhi yu xiang.
qi de nai chang.
xiu zhi yu guo.  
qi de nai feng.  
xiu zhi yu tian xia.  
qi de nai pu.
gu yi shen guan shen.  
yi jia guan jia.  
yi xiang guan xiang.
yi guo guan guo.  
yi tian xia guan tian xia.  
wu he yi zhi tian xia ran zai.
yi ci.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 54

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Google Translator

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"What is planted by the best planter can never be removed;
What is embraced by the best embracer can never be loosened.
Thus his children and grandchildren will be able to continue their ancestral sacrifice for endless generations.
If he applies Tao to himself his virtue will be genuine;
If he applies it to his family his virtue will be abundant;
If he applies it to his village his virtue will be lasting;
If he applies it to his country his virtue will be full;
If he applies it to the world his virtue will be universal.
Therefore by one's person one may observe persons;
By one's family one may observe families;
By one's village one may observe villages;
By one's country one may observe countries;
By one's world, one may observe worlds.
How do I know that the world may be so governed by Tao?
By this observation."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 54 

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"That which is firmly rooted,
is not easily torn from the ground;
just as that which is firmly grasped,
does not slip easily from the hand.
The virtue of the Tao is real,
if cultivated in oneself;
when loved in the family, it abounds;
when throughout the village, it will grow;
and in the nation, be abundant.
When it is real universally,
virtue is in all people.
All things are microcosms of the Tao;
the world a microcosmic universe,
the nation a microcosm of the world,
the village a microcosmic nation;
the family a village in microcosmic view,
and the body a microcosm of one's own family;
from single cell to galaxy."
-  Translated by Stan Rosenthal, Chapter 54 

 

 

"That which is well planted is not uprooted.
That which is well clasped is not snatched away.
Sons and grandsons will then not interrupt their sacrifices.
If one practices (the Way) in one's person, its Virtue will be genuineness.
If one practices it in one's family, its Virtue will be abundance.
If one practices it in one's village, its Virtue will be durability.
If one practices it in one's state, its Virtue will be prosperity.
If one practices it in the Empire, its Virtue will be universality.
From the standpoint of one's own person one views other persons, from that of one's own family other families,
    from that of one's own village other villages, from that of one's own state other states,
    from that of the Empire the Empire.
How do I know that it is like this for the Empire?
By this."
-  Translated by Jan J. L. Duyvendak, 1954, Chapter 54

 

 

"Since true foundation cannot fail
But holds as good as new,
Many a worshipful son shall hail
A father who lived true.'
Realized in one man, fitness has its rise;
Realized in a family, fitness multiplies;
Realized in a village, fitness gathers weight;
Realized in a country, fitness becomes great;
Realized in the world, fitness fills the skies.
And thus the fitness of one man
You find in the family he began,
You find in the village that accrued,
You find in the country that ensued,
You find in the world's whole multitude.
How do I know this integrity?
Because it could all begin in me."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 54

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"When the foundation is laid well, and the mortar sound
The house will stand long
And your descendents will honor your memory
Cultivate virtue in yourself - see yourself - so it will be genuine
Cultivate it in your family - see your family - so it will spread
Cultivate it in your village - see your village - so it will have roots
Cultivate it in your nation - see your nation - so it will be abundant
Cultivate it in the world - see the world - so there will be nothing else
How do I know the world works this way?
There is no how, I listen, and I know."
-  Translated by Ted Wrigley, Chapter 54 

 

 

"A good builder doesn’t destroy.
A good embracer doesn’t abandon.
Future generations would then be grateful to them forever.

By an individual’s progress – their De is then genuine.
By a household’s progress – their De then exceeds.
By the countryside’s progress – their De then increases.
By the city’s progress – their De is then productive.
By the world’s progress – their De is then sweeping.

With an individual – concentrate on the individual.
With a home – concentrate on the home.
With the countryside – concentrate on the countryside.
With the city – concentrate on the city.
With the world – concentrate on the world.

How is it possible for me to understand they are right with the world?
Because of these."
-  Translated by Nina Correa, 2005, Chapter 54

 

 

"Who is firmly established is not easily shaken.
Who has a firm grasp does not easily let go.
From generation to generation his ancestral sacrifices
Shall be continued without fail.

Cultivated in the individual, character will become genuine;
Cultivated in the family, character will become abundant;
Cultivated in the village, character will multiply;
Cultivated in the state, character will prosper;
Cultivated in the world, character will become universal.

Therefore:
According to the character of the individual, judge the individual;
According to the character of the family, judge the family;
According to the character of the village, judge the village;
According to the character of the state, judge the state;
According to the character of the world, judge the world.
How do I know this is so?
By this."
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1955, Chapter 54  

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"The well-rooted cannot be dislodged.
The tightly-held will not be lost.
Generation after generation
Worship their ancestors forever.
Cultivate it in yourself
Its virtue will be real.
Cultivate it in the family
Its virtue will overflow.
Cultivate it in the village
Its virtue will extend.
Cultivate it in the state
Its virtue will flourish.
Cultivate it in the realm
Its virtue will be all-pervasive.
Assess the self by considering yourself.
Assess the family by considering the family.
Assess the village by considering the village.
Assess the state by considering the state.
Assess the realm by considering the realm.
How do I know the realm is like that?
By means of this."
-  Translated by A. S. Kline, Chapter 54   

 

 

"Good construction does not fall down, a good embrace does not let go; their heirs honor them unceasingly.
Cultivate it in yourself, and that virtue is real; cultivate it in the home, and that virtue is abundant;
    cultivate it in the locality, and that virtue lasts; cultivate it in the nation, and that virtue is rich;
    cultivate it in the world, and that virtue is universal.
So observe yourself by yourself, observe the home by the home, observe the locality by the locality,
    observe the nation by the nation, observe the world by the world.
How do I know the world is as it is?
By this."
-  Translated by Thomas Cleary, 1991, Chapter 54 

 

 

"Who plants well will not have his work uprooted.
Who embraces well will not lose what he holds.
The offerings of his sons and grandsons will never end.
Who thus regulates himself has virtue which is genuine.
Who thus regulates his household has virtue which overflows.
Who thus regulates his neighbourhood has virtue which excels.
Who thus regulates the state has virtue which abounds.
Who thus regulates the world has virtue which is universal.
Therefore let every man prove himself.
Let each household, neighbourhood, and state do the same.
Let the world also follow the same course.
How do I know that it must be thus with the world?
By what has just been said."
-  Translated by C. Spurgeon Medhurst, 1905, Chapter 54 

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

 

                                     

 

 

 

"He who is established in goodness shall not be uprooted.
He who cherishes goodness shall not be cast out.
His children to all generations shall be blessed unceasingly.
Cultivate it in the body, your Teh shall become true.
Cultivate it in the family, your Teh shall superabound.
Cultivate it in the village, your Teh shall endure.
Cultivate it in the kingdom, your Teh shall flourish.
Cultivate it in the world, your Teh shall be universal.
Therefore, according to the body, judge the body.
According to the family, judge the family.
According to the village, judge the village.
According to the kingdom, judge the kingdom.
According to the world, judge the world..
How shall I know that there is some faith in the world?
The witness is in itself."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 54

 

 

"The essence of Infinity can be ignored but never uprooted.
If it is acknowledged, it cannot be lost
and it will manifest peace and harmony
from parents to children forever.

Acknowledge it in yourself
and peace and harmony will become real.
Acknowledge it in your family
and peace and harmony will grow.
Acknowledge it in your town
and peace and harmony will influence your teachers.
Acknowledge it in your nation
and peace and harmony will displace war.
Acknowledge it in the universe
and peace and harmony will be everywhere.

Therefore,
see others as yourself,
see other families as your family,
see other towns as your town,
see other nations as your nation,
see the universe as a manifestation
of the Infinite.

How do I know this is the way things are?
Because I am at one with Infinity."
-  Translated by John Worldpeace, Chapter 54  

 

 

"What Tao plants cannot be plucked,
What Tao clasps, cannot slip.
By its virtue alone can one generation after another carry on the ancestrial sacrifice.
Apply it to yourself and by its power you will be freed from dross.
Apply it to your household and your household shall thereby have abundance.
Apply it to the village, and the village will be made secure.
Apply it to the kingdom, and the kingdom shall thereby be made to flourish.
Apply it to an empire, and the empire shall thereby be extended.
Therefore just as through oneself one may contemplate Oneself,
So through the household one may contemplate the Household,
And through the village, one may contemplate the Village,
And through the kingdom, one may contemplate the Kingdom,
And through the empire, one may contemplate the Empire.
How do I know that the empire is so?
By this."
-  Translated by Arthur Waley, 1934, Chapter 54 

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   Translated by Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"The good planter never uproots,

The good keeper holds to his prize,

And sons and grandsons shall bring their fruits

In a ceaseless sacrifice.

 

Who practises Tao in his life,

His virtues will ever be sound,

Who practises it with his children and wife,

His virtues will greatly abound.

 

Who practises it in his town,

His virtues will last and extend,

And if in the state or the realm, then down

His virtues will flow without end.

 

Test others by oneself alone,

Test families by one family,

And in one town, and state, and realm will be shown

The test of what others will be.

 

How know I that this single source

Throughout the whole world will act so?

By this, that it is, in its ceaseless course,

Forever the self-same flow."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 54

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

 

 

"Tao’s power is so deeply entrenched
it can never be uprooted.
Tao’s power clings so tightly
it can never slip away.
It will endure for generations.

If you get in touch
with the power of Tao,
it will become real.
If your family gets in touch
with the power of Tao,
the power will flourish.

If your community gets in touch
with the power of Tao,
the power will grow even stronger.
If your country gets in touch
with the power of Tao,
the power will become abundant.

If the world gets in touch
with the power of Tao,
the power will be everywhere.

How can I know this?
I just do."
-  Translated by Ron Hogan, 1995, Chapter 54 

 

 

"Das Ordnungsgefüge der Lebensgemeinschaften

Was gut verwurzelt ist, wird nicht entwurzelt,
Was gut geführt wird, wird nicht verführt.
Was in der Kinder und Enkel Gedächtnis lebt, wird nicht untergehen.
Wer dem wirkenden Selbst in sich gehorcht, der lebt echt.
Wer es in der Familie beachtet, dem wird des Lebens Fülle.
Wer es in der Gemeinde beachtet, lernt Beständigkeit.
Wer es im Volk beachtet, erkennt, daß es auf die innere Mächtigkeitankommt.
Wer es in der Menschheit beachtet, findet es als das Allumfassende.

Darum:
Nach Deiner eigenen Reife erkenne die andern.
Nach der Reife Deiner Familie miß die andern Familien.
Deine Gemeinde sei der Maßstab für die andern Gemeinden.
An Deinem Volk miß die andern Völker.
Nach Deiner Menschlichkeit beurteile die Menschheit.
Wodurch erkenne ich dieses Ordnungsgesetz in der Welt?
Durch es selber."
-  Translated by Rudolf Backofen, 1949, Chapter 54

 

 

"Was gut gepflanzt ist, wird nicht ausgerissen.
Was gut festgehalten wird, wird nicht entgehen.
Wer sein Gedächtnis Söhnen und Enkeln hinterläßt,
hört nicht auf
Wer seine Person gestaltet, dessen Leben wird wahr.
Wer seine Familie gestaltet, dessen Leben wird völlig.
Wer seine Gemeinde gestaltet, dessen Leben wird wachsen.
Wer sein Land gestaltet, dessen Leben wird reich.
Wer die Welt gestaltet, dessen Leben wird weit.

Darum: Nach deiner Person beurteile die Person des andern.
Nach deiner Familie beurteile die Familie des andern.
Nach deiner Gemeinde beurteile die Gemeinde der andern.
Nach deinem Land beurteile das Land der andern.
Nach deiner Welt beurteile die Welt der andern.
Wie weiß ich die Beschaffenheit der Welt?
Eben durch dies."
-  Translated by Richard Wilhelm, 1911, Chapter 54 

 

 

"What is firmly established cannot be uprooted.
What is firmly grasped cannot slip away.
It will be honored from generation to generation.
Cultivate Virtue in your self,
And Virtue will be real.
Cultivate it in the family,
And Virtue will abound.
Cultivate it in the village,
And Virtue will grow.
Cultivate it in the nation,
And Virtue will be abundant.
Cultivate it in the universe,
And Virtue will be everywhere.

Therefore look at the body as body;
Look at the family as family;
Look at the village as village;
Look at the nation as nation;
Look at the universe as universe.

How do I know the universe is like this?
By looking!"
-  Translated by Gai-fu Feng and Jane English, 1989, Chapter 54

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"He who plants rightly never uproots.
He who lays hold rightly never relinquishes.
His posterity will honour him continually.
Whoever develops the Tao in himself will be rooted in virtue.
Whoever develops the Tao in his family will cause his virtue to spread.
Whoever develops the Tao in his village will increase prosperity.
Whoever develops the Tao in the kingdom will make good fortune prevail.
Whoever develops Tao in the world will make virtue universal.
I observe myself, and so I come to know others.
I observe my family, and all others grow familiar.
I study this world, and others come within my knowledge.
How else should I come to know the laws which govern all things, save thus, that I observe them in myself?"
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 54 

 

 

"He who is well established in Tao cannot be pulled away.
He who has a firm grasp of Tao cannot be separated from it.
Thus from generation to generation his ancestral sacrifice will never be suspended.
When one cultivates virtue in his person, it becomes genuine virtue.
When one cultivates virtue in his family, it becomes overflowing virtue.
When one cultivates virtue in his community, it becomes lasting virtue.
When one cultivates virtue in his country, it becomes abundant virtue.
When one cultivates virtue in the world, it becomes universal.
Therefore the person should be viewed as a person.
The family should be viewed as a family.
The community should be viewed as a community.
The country should be viewed as a country.
And the world should be viewed as the world.
How do I know this to be the case in the world?
Through this."
-  Translated by Wing-Tsit Chan, 1963, Chapter 54 

 

 

"Live and Work Respectfully

Those skilled in building will build sturdy buildings.
Those skilled in hugging will hug fast.
Because they are serious and excel in what they do
they are remembered and honored by all their descendents.

He who applies the same seriousness to serve his own body has true virtue.
He who applies the same seriousness to serve his family
has virtue beyond himself.
He who applies the same seriousness to serve his village
has virtue that grows further afield.
He who applies the same seriousness to serve the nation
has virtue that is profuse.
He who applies to same seriousness to serve all under heaven,
has virtue that pervades the world.

Thus we see our body as our body is;
See our family as our family is;
We see our village as our village is;
See our nation as our nation is;
And we see everything under heaven as everything is.
How may we know the nature of everything under heaven?
With this same and serious attitude."
-  Translated by Lok Sang Ho, 2002, Chapter 54

 

 

"Celui qui sait fonder ne craint point la destruction; celui qui sait conserver ne craint point de perdre.
Ses fils et ses petits-fils lui offriront des sacrifices sans interruption.
Si l'homme cultive le Tao au-dedans de lui-même, sa vertu deviendra sincère.
S'il le cultive dans sa famille, sa vertu deviendra surabondante.
S'il le cultive dans le village, sa vertu deviendra étendue.
S'il le cultive dans le royaume, sa vertu deviendra florissante.
S'il le cultive dans l'empire, sa vertu deviendra universelle.
C'est pourquoi, d'après moi-même, je juge des autres hommes;
d'après une famille, je juge des autres familles;
d'apès un village, je juge des autres villages;
d'après un royaume, je juge des autres royaumes;
d'après l'empire, je juge de l'empire.
Comment sais-je qu'il en est ainsi de l'empire ?
C'est uniquement par là."
-  Translated by Stanislas Julien, 1842, Chapter 54 

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing

 

                                      

 


 

"Lo que está bien arraigado no será arrancado.
Lo que está bien abrazado no será soltado.
Será honrado de generación en generación.
Si la cultivas en tí mismo,
la virtud será verdadera.
Si la cultivas en tu familia,
la virtud será abundante.
Si la cultivas en tu pueblo,
la virtud será grande.
Si la cultivas en el Estado,
la virtud será poderosa.
Si la cultivas en el mundo,
la virtud será universal.
Por esto, conoce a otros por sí mismos;
Mira a la familia como familia.
Mira al pueblo como pueblo.
Mira al Estado como Estado.
Mira al universo como universo.
¿Cómo puedo entonces conocer el mundo?
Porque lo veo por mi mismo."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 54

 

 

"Lo que está bien plantado no se puede arrancar,
lo que está bien apretado no se pued soltar.
Gracias a la virtud, lo hijos y los nietos
celebran sin faltar el culto a los antepasados.

Cultivada en misma,
su virtud será auténtica;
cultivada en su familia,
se enriquecerá;
cultivada en el Estado,
será floreciente;
cultivada en el mundo,
llegará a ser universal.

Al prójimo se le observa a través de uno mismo;
a las familias a través de su familia;
las aldeas a través de su aldea;
los Estados a través de su Estado;
el mundo a través de este mundo.
Cómo puedo saber cómo va el mundo?
Aplicando todo lo que se acaba de decir."

-  Translated by Alba, 1998, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 54 

 

 

"Una casa bien construida se mantiene firme;
si los fundamentos son buenos nunca se hundirá y podrá ser utilizada por los descendientes.

Practica tú mismo los principios del Camino y tu virtud será genuina,
practícalos en tu hogar y la virtud florecerá en él, practícalos en tu provincia y tu provincia perdurará,
practícalos en tu reino y tu reino será próspero, practícalos en el mundo y la virtud será universal
.
En consecuencia, el hombre será juzgado por el hombre que sigue el Camino;
el hogar, según su virtud; la provincia se comparará a la provincia perdurable;
el reino, al reino próspero; y el mundo, al mundo del Camino y de la Virtud."
-  Translated into Spanish by Chantal López, 2010,
Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 54

 

 

"Lo que está bien plantado no se puede arrancar.
Lo que se abraza firmemente no se puede desprender.
Los descendientes Ilevarán a cabo los ritos ancestrales por generaciones sin fin.
Cultiva la virtud en tu persona y ésta será parte de tu ser.
Cultívala en tu familia y ésta perdurará.
Cultívala en la aldea y ésta crecerá.
Cultívala en el estado y éste florecerá..
Cultívala en el imperio y será universal.
Por lo tanto:
En sí mismo se ve tu que sucede en los otros.
En la familia se ve lo de la familia.
En la aldea lo de la aldea.
En el estado lo del estado.
En el imperio lo del imperio.
¿Cómo conozco el imperio?
Por esto.
Et misterioso encanto."
Translation from Logia Medio Dia, 2015, Capitulo 54

 

 

"Lo que está bien plantado no será arrancado.
Lo que está bien abrazado no será soltado.
A los antepasados ofrecerán siempre sacrificios los
hijos y los nietos

Si la cultiva en sí mismo
su virtud será verdadera.
Si la cultiva en su familia
su virtud será abundante.
Si la cultiva en su pueblo
su virtud será grande.
Si la cultiva en el Estado
su virtud será poderosa.
Si la cultiva en el mundo
su virtud será universal

Por esto, conoce a otros por sí mismo;
conoce las familias por la virtud de su familia;
conoce los pueblos por la virtud de su pueblo;
conoce los estados por la virtud de su estado;
conoce el mundo por la virtud del mundo.
¿Cómo saber que así se conoce el mundo?
Por esto mismo.
no se le puede despreciar."
-  Spanish Version Online at RatMachines, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 54

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #55

Previous Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #53

Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 54

 

Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse.  Complete versions of all 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching by many different translators in many languages: 124 English, 24 German, 14 Russian, 7 Spanish, 5 French and many other languages.  Links are organized first by languages, and then alphabetically by translators.  Formatting varies somewhat.  The original website at Onekellotus went offline in 2012; but, the extensive collection of these Tao Te Ching versions was saved for posterity by the Internet Archive Wayback Machine and available as of 9/9/2015.  This is an outstanding original collection of versions of the Daodejing─ the Best on the Internet.  Caution: copyright infringement may sometimes be an issue at this website. 


Tao Te Ching, Translations into English: Terebess Asia Online (TAO).  124 nicely formatted complete English language translations, on separate webpages, of the Daodejing.  Alphabetical index by translators.  Each webpage has all 81 chapters of the Tao Te Ching translated into English.  A useful collection!  Many reformatted and colored versions from the original collection at Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse.  Caution: copyright infringement may sometimes be an issue at this website. 


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Tao Te Ching  Translated by D. C. Lau.  Addison Wesley, Reprint Edition, 2000.  192 pages.  ISBN: 978-0140441314. 

 

 

                                                           

 

 

The Taoism Reader  By Thomas Cleary.  Shambhala, 2012.  192 pages.


Change Your Thoughts - Change Your Life: Living the Wisdom of the Tao  By Wayne W. Dyer.  Hay House, Reprint Edition, 2009.  416 pages. 


The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons.  By Deng Ming-Dao.  New York, Harper Collins, 2013.  429 pages.  


The Classic of the Way and Virtue: A New Translation of the Tao-te Ching of Laozi as Interpreted by Wang Bi.  Translated by Richard John Lynn.  Translations from the Asian Classics Series.  New York, Columbia University Press, 1999.  Extensive index, glossaries, notes, 244 pages. 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Translators Index, Tao Te Ching Versions in English, Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions of the Chapters 


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español, Translators Index 


Concordance to the Daodejing


The Tao of Zen.  By Ray Grigg.  Tuttle, 2012, 256 pages.  Argues for the view that Zen is best characterized as a version of philosophical Taoism (i.e., Laozi and Zhuangzi) and not Mahayana Buddhism. 


Chapter 1 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6   Valley Spirit Center in Red Bluff, California.   Sacred Circle in the Gushen Grove. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Mind-Body Arts, Philosophy, Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

 

                                            

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2015. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

This webpage was last modified or updated on September 26, 2015. 
 
This webpage was first distributed online on June 24, 2011. 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0


 

 

Michael P. Garofalo's E-mail

Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, California

Study Tai Chi or Chi Kung or Yoga with Mike Garofalo

 

 


 


Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides
 

Cloud Hands Blog


Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

Bodymind Theory and Practices, Somaesthetics

The Five Senses

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons

Grandmaster Chang San Feng

Virtues

Qigong (Chi Kung) Health Practices

One Old Daoist Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

Comments, Feedback, Kudos

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles (1892) and Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanizations

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

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