Chapter 3

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

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Chapter 3

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Controlling Desires, Quieting the People (min), Empty (hsü), Limiting Actions, Goods or Merchandise (huo), Wise Leaders Exercise Restraint, Quietness, Wishes or Ambitions (chih), Knowledge (chih), Restraint, Display or Show (chien), Simplicity, Sage (shêng jên), Basic Needs, Virtuous or Worthy (hsien), Not-Thinking, Stilling Mind, Strength, Not Acting, Inner Life, Peace, Actionless Activity (wu wei), Essentials, Governing, No-Knowledge (wu chih), No-Desire (wu yü), Desire or Want (yü), Rule or Govern (chih), Jealousy, Not Hoarding, Heart or Mind (hsin), Value, Keeping the People at Rest, Strengthen or Sturdy (ch'iang), Sage, Rest, Bones, Prize or Honor (kuei), Dare or Venture (kan), Simple Minded, Quieting Thoughts, Will Power, Honor or Esteem (shang), Natural, Difficult (nan), Action, Stomach or Belly (fu), Making (wei), Lead and Teach by Example, Bones or Frame (ku), Steal or Theft (tao), Wise, Anxious or Troubled (luan), Obtain or Get (), Weakened or Relaxed (jo), Control, Wants or Desires (), Emotions, Compete or Contend (chêng), Orderly or Controlled (chih), Causes or Makes (shih),  安民

Términos en Español:  Vacío, Limitación de Acciones, Bienes, Mercancías, Sabios, Moderación, Tranquilidad, Deseos, Ambiciones, Saber, Restricción, Exhibición, Mostrar, Sencillez, Necesidades Básicas, Virtuosos, Digno, Pensamiento, Fuerza, No Actuar, Vida, Paz, Gobierno, No Deseo, No Quiere, Regla, Celos, No Acaparamiento, Corazón, Mente, Valor, Fortalecimiento, Resto, Huesos, Premio, Honor, Atreverse, Empresa, Espíritus, Acallar los Pensamientos, la Fuerza de voluntad, Honra, Estima, Natural, Difícil, Acción, Hacer, Robar, Robo, Ansioso, Preocupado, Obtener, Relajado, Control, Emociones, Competir, Contender, Ordenada, Controlada, Sausas, Marcas   

 

 

"Neglecting to praise the worthy deters people from emulating them,
Not prizing rare treasures deters a man from becoming a thief, 
Ignoring the things which awaken desire keeps the heart at rest.
Therefore the wise ruler does not suggest unnecessary things,
He seeks to satisfy the minds of his people.
He seeks to allay appetites but strengthen bones.
He ever tries by keeping people in ignorance to keep them satisfied and those who have knowledge he restrains from evil.
If he, himself, practices restraint then everything is in quietness."
-  Translated by Dwight Goddard and Henri Borel, 1919, Chapter 3    

 

 

"Avoiding distinctions of merit among the people prevents jealousy.
Not setting a value on rare things prevents theft.
Not seeking the things of peace keeps the mind in peace.
Thus the Sage governs by ridding the heart of its desires; giving the stomach due satisfaction, by resting the muscles and strengthening the bones, by preserving the world from a knowledge of evil and hence from its desire, and by making those who have such knowledge afraid to use it.
He acts by non-action, and by this he governs all."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn-Old, 1904, Chapter 3   

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"Not to value and employ men of superior ability is the way to keep the people from rivalry among themselves;
Not to prize articles which are difficult to procure is the way to keep them from becoming thieves;
Not to show them what is likely to excite their desires is the way to keep their minds from disorder.  
Therefore the sage, in the exercise of his government, empties their minds, fills their bellies, weakens their wills, and strengthens their bones.
He constantly tries to keep them without knowledge and without desire, and where there are those who have knowledge, to keep them from presuming to act on it.
When there is this abstinence from action, good order is universal."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 3

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"Exalt not men, so that the people may not fight.
Prize not rare objects, so that the people may not steal.
Look not on desirable things, so that the people's hearts be not troubled.
That is why the self-controlled man governs by stilling the emotions, by quieting thought, by mastering the will, by increasing strength.
He always teaches the people to know the Inner Life, to desire the Inner Life.
He teaches the Masters of knowledge to cease from activity, to act through activity of the Inner Life; then Inner Life will govern all."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 3 

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"By not showing exclusive approval of those who are eminent in virtue, the Sage prevents the people from quarrelling;
By not setting high store on things difficult to obtain, he prevents the people from becoming robbers;
By closing his eyes to objects of desire, he secures his heart from corruption.
Wherefore the Sage, in governing, does so with a heart empty of all distractions and temptations, but with a bosom full of justice and benevolence,
He makes his will pliant, his bodily frame-work firm;
He ever keeps the people from harmful knowledge and desires, and prevents those who have such knowledge from daring to put it into practice.
He pursues a policy of inaction, and there is therefore nothing that is left ungoverned."
-  Translated by Frederic H. Balfour, 1884, Chapter 3

 

 

不尚賢, 使民不爭; 不貴難得之貨, 使民不為盜.
不見可欲, 使心不亂.
是以聖人之治.
虛其心.
實其腹.
弱其志.
強其骨.
常使民無知無欲.
使夫知者不敢為也.
為無為.
則無不治.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 3  

 

 

pu shang hsien, shih min pu chêng; pu kuei nan tê chih huo, shih min pu wei tao.
pu chien k'o yü, shih min hsin pu luan.
shih yi shêng jên chih chih. 
hsü ch'i hsin.
shih ch'i fu.
jo ch'i chih.
ch'iang ch'i ku.
ch'ang shih min wu chih wu yü. 
shih fu chih chê pu kan wei yeh. 
wei wu wei.
tsê wu pu chih.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 3 

 


Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 3 of the Tao Te Ching

 


bu shang xian, shi min bu zheng; bu gui nan de zhi huo, shi min bu wei dao. 
bu jian ke yu, shi min xin bu luan. 
shi yi sheng ren zhi zhi. 
xu qi xin. 
shi qi fu. 
ruo qi zhi. 
qiang qi gu. 
chang shi min wu zhi wu yu. 
shi fu zhi zhe bu gan wei ye. 
wei wu wei. 
ze wu bu zhi.
-  Hanyu Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 3 

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin, German, French and English.  Excellent! 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin and Wade Giles Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star. 

 

 

"Not exalting the worthy keeps the people from emulation.
Not valuing rare things keeps them from theft.
Not showing what is desirable keeps their hearts from confusion.
Therefore the sage rules:
By emptying their hearts,
Filling their stomachs,
Weakening their ambitions
And strengthening their bones.
He always keeps them from knowing what is evil and desiring what is good; thus he gives the crafty ones no chance to act.
He governs by non-action; consequently there is nothing ungoverned."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 3 

 

 

 
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance   By Alexander Simkins
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed   By Derek Lin
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony    By Ming-Dao Deng
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life   By Ming-Dao Deng
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook   Translated by Thomas Cleary

 

                             

 

 

 

"If we stop looking for “persons of superior morality” (hsien) to put in power,
There will be no more jealousies among the people.
If we cease to set store by products that are hard to get,
There will be no more thieves.
If the people never see such things as excite desire,
Their hearts will remain placid and undisturbed.
Therefore the Sage rules
By emptying their hearts
And filling their hearts?
Weakening their intelligence
And toughening their sinews
Ever striving to make the people knowledgeless and desireless.
Indeed he sees to it that if there be any who have knowledge,
They dare not interfere.
Yet through his actionless activity all things are duly regulated."
-  Translated by Arthur Waley, 1934, Chapter 3 

 

 

"The holy man abides by non-assertion in his affairs and conveys by silence his instruction.
When the ten thousand things arise, verily, he refuses them not.
He quickens but owns not.
He acts but claims not.
Merit he accomplishes, but he does not dwell on it.
Since he does not dwell on it
It will never leave him.”
-  Translated by Paul Carus and D.T. Suzuki, 1913, Chapter 3

 

 

"Not making any special case of cleverness, of ability, will have the result that people will no longer push themselves.
Not to prize rare objects will have the result that no one will continue to steal.
To show nothing as alluring will have the effect of putting the people's hearts at rest.
Therefore the politics of Sages consists in emptying the minds of men and filling their stomachs, in weakening their initiative and strengthening their bones.
Their constant care is to hold the people in ignorance and apathy.
They make things such that clever people dare not to act, for there is nothing that cannot be sorted out through the practice of non-action."
-  Translated by Derek Bryce, 1999, Chapter 3 

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

 

                             

 

 

 

"When worth is not honoured the people may be kept from strife.
When rare articles are not valued the people are kept from theft.
When the desirable is left unnoticed the heart is not confused.
Therefore, the method of government by the Holy Man is to empty the heart, while strengthening the purpose; to make the will pliant, and the character strong.
He ever keeps the people simple-minded and passionless, so that the world-wise do not dare to plan.
Practice non-action and everything will be regulated."
-  Translated by C. Spurgeon Medhurst, 1905, Chapter 3

 

 

"If you overly esteem talented individuals,
people will become overly competitive.
If you overvalue possessions,
people will begin to steal.

Do not display your treasures
or people will become envious.

The Master leads by
emptying people's minds,
filling their bellies,
weakening their ambitions,
and making them become strong.
Preferring simplicity and freedom from desires,
avoiding the pitfalls of knowledge and wrong action.

For those who practice not-doing,
everything will fall into place."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 3  

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"Not honouring men of worth keeps the people from competing;
Not wanting rare things keeps the people from thievery;
Not showing off desirous objects keeps the hearts of the people from disaster.
That is why the Sage governs himself by relaxing the mind, reinforcing the abdomen, gentling the will, strengthening the bones.
Always cause the people to be without knowledge or desires.
Cause the intelligent ones to dare not act.
Let there be Non-action and there is nothing that will not be well regulated."
-  Translated by Tam C. Gibbs, 1981, Chapter 3 

 

 

"When the superior are not exalted, envy will not be aroused.
Then there will be no rivalry or contention among people.
When wealth is not treasured, desire for possessions will not be stirred up.
Then people will not be tempted to rob one another.
By shutting that which is desirable out of sight, the heart will remain undisturbed.
Then there will be no confusion in the hearts of people.
The guidance of the Universal One of natural wholeness is therefore:
Empty your mind.
Enjoy good health.
Weaken your ambitions.
Strengthen your essence.
When people are free from cunning, desire, and artifice, everything will be well-ordered of its own accord."
-  Translated by Ni Hua-Ching, 1995, Chapter 3 


 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

 

                                     

 

 

 

"Exalt not the wise,
So that the people shall not scheme and contend;
Prize not rare objects,
So that the people shall not steal;
Shut out from site the things of desire,
So that the people's hearts shall not be disturbed.
Therefore in the government of the Sage:
He keeps empty their hearts
Makes full their bellies,
Discourages their ambitions,
Strengthens their frames;
So that the people may be innocent of knowledge and desires.
And the cunning ones shall not presume to interfere.
By action without deeds
May all live in peace."
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1955, Chapter 3  

 

 

"If those who are excellent find no preferment,
The people will cease to contend for promotion.
If goods that are hard to obtain are not favored,
The people will cease to turn robbers or bandits.
If things much desired are kept under cover,
Disturbance will cease in the minds of the people.
The Wise Man's policy, accordingly,
Will be to empty people's hearts and minds,
To fill their bellies, weaken their ambition,
Give them sturdy frames and always so,
To keep them uniformed, without desire,
And knowing ones not venturing to act.
Be still while you work
And keep full control
Over all."
-  Translated by Raymond Blakney, 1955, Chapter 3 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"Rewarding not the talented from fierce contention frees,

With wealth unprized, the people will not take to thievish arts,

Not seeing what awakes desire will keep the mind at ease,

And so the sage' s governing unloads the people' s hearts.

He fills the stomach, strengthens bones, and calms the daring will,

He causes people not to know desires they should not hold,

And those who know of such he keeps, from reckless daring, still,

He acts the nothing acting, and there' s nothing uncontrolled."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 3   

 

 

"When you praise people for their achievements, people will compete
When you call things valuable, people will steal
When people flaunt desirable things, it will make other people restless
Therefore the sage sets himself to the task of emptying their heads 
To make sure they're not hungry, discourage their ambitions and strengthen their bodies
So people will be without anxiety and without the desire for knowledge
And the scientists will be played off the field
When people won't labour anymore
All will live in peace."
-  Translated by Anonymous, Chapter 3 

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   Translated by Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"If no distinctions of superiority and inferiority prevail among officers, they will devote themselves to their tasks rather than to rivalries with one another.
If no special value is placed upon rare things, one will have no incentive for stealing them.
If nothing appears to arouse envy, one will remain satisfied with things as they are
Since this is so, the wise administrator does not lead people to set their hearts upon what they cannot have, but satisfies their inner needs. He does not promote ambition to improve their status, but supports their self-sufficiency. He does not complicate their lives with knowledge of multifarious details or with an urge to attend to this, that and the other.
By keeping people contented, he prevents those who mistakenly believe that ambition is better than contentment from leading the contented astray.
By being calm and contented himself, he sets an example for his people."
-  Translated by Archie J. Bahm, 1958, Chapter 3 

 

 

"Not exalting ability ensures that the people do not strive.
Not prizing goods that are difficult to obtain ensures that the people do not become robbers.
Not showing them what they might desire ensures that the people do not feel disturbed in their hearts.
Therefore the Saint, in the exercise of government, empties their hearts and fills their bellies, weakens their wills and strengthens their bones, thus constantly ensuring that the people are without knowledge and without desires and that those who have knowledge dare not act. He practices Non-action and consequently there is nothing that is not well governed."
-  Translated by Jan J. L. Duyvendak, 1954, Chapter 3 

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

"No ensalzar los talentos
para que el pueblo no compita.
No estimar lo que es difícil de adquirir
para que el pueblo no se haga ladrón.
No mostrar lo codiciable
para que su corazón no se ofusque.
El sabio gobierna de modo que
vacía el corazón de deseos,
llena el vientre de alimentos,
debilita la ambición,
y fortalece hasta los huesos.
Así evita que el pueblo tenga codicia
y ambiciones,
para que los oportunistas
no busquen aventajarse de los otros.
Quien practica la no-acción,
todo lo gobierna.
"
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Capítulo 3

 

 

"No ensalzar los talentos
para que el pueblo no compita.
No estimar lo que es difícil de adquirir
para que el pueblo no se haga ladrón.
No mostrar lo codiciable
para que su corazón no se ofusque.

El sabio gobierna de modo que
vacía el corazón,
llena el vientre,
debilita la ambición,
y fortalece los huesos.

Así evita que el pueblo tenga saber
ni deseos,
para que los más astutos
no busquen su triunfo.
Quien practica el no-obrar todo
lo gobierna."
-  Spanish Version Online at RatMachines, Capítulo 3 

 

 

 

 

Taoism, Daoism

 

 

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Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 3

 

Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español


Concordance to the Daodejing


The Tao of Zen.  By Ray Grigg.  Tuttle, 2012, 256 pages.  Argues for the view that Zen is best characterized a version of philosophical Taoism (i.e., Laozi and Zhuangzi) and not Mahayana Buddhism. 


Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse  The largest collection of very nicely formatted complete versions of the Tao Te Ching.  The collection includes 209 complete versions in 27 languages, plus 28 Chinese versions.  There are 112 English language versions of the Tao Te Ching available at this website.  A variety of search methods and comparison methods are provided, as well a a detailed index.  Offline on January 30, 2014. 


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 3 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6 


Tao Te Ching English Translations from Terebess Asia Online.  Over 30 translations. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 3, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2010-2014. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.


This webpage was last modified or updated on April 14, 2014. 
This webpage was first distributed online on November 4, 2010. 
 

 

Michael P. Garofalo's E-mail

Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, California

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Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides

Cloud Hands Blog

Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

One Old Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81