Chapter 20

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

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Chapter 20

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Learning, Being Different from Ordinary People (jên), Enjoying or Partaking (hsiang), Isolation of the Sage, Mother (mu), Doubt, Fear, No or Disapproval (a), Simplicity, Return or Go Back (kuei), Baby, Ocean or Sea (hai), Doubts of the Hermit, Springtime (ch'un), Homeless, Joyful or Merry (hsi), Solitary Life, Rustic Living, Worldly or Common (su), Stupidity, Loneliness, Mind or Heart (hsin), Calm or Steady (p'o), Stop or Anchor (chih), Not Learning, Sign or Omen (chao), Innocence, Alert or Sharp (cha), Useless, Alone or Solitary (tu), Meditation, Sitting, Multitude, People, Differ (ch'ü), Convention, Stop Learning, Weary or Tired (lei), Fear or Dread (wei), Good or Virtuous (shan), Confused or Chaotic (t'un), Dull or Dejected (mên), Bright, Use or Purpose (yi), Climbing or Ascending (têng), Little or Minute or Few (chi), Rustic or Unrefined (pi), Bright or Luminous (chao), Dull, Ordinary, Gale or Whirlwind (liu), Wilderness or Uncultivated (huang), Food or Nourishment or Milk (shih), Value or Cherish (kuei), Alike or Similar (jo), Unique, Yes (wei), One of a Kind, Stubborn or Thickhead (wan), Great Feast (ta lao), Smile (hai), Impractical, Newborn Baby (ying erh), Bad or Evil (wu), Foolish or Stupid (), Dark or Dim (hun), Excess or Surplus (), End or Limit (yang), Tower or Terrace (t'ai), Tranquil or Placid (tan), Uselessness of the Wise Man,  異俗  
Términos en Español:  Aprendizaje, Disfrutar, Sabio, Madre, Duda, Miedo, Sencillez, Devolución, Volver, Océano, Mar, Primavers, Alegre, Feliz, Solitario, Mundano, Estupidez, Soledad, Corazón, Calma, Aprender, Presagio, Inocencia, Alerta, Inútil, Meditación, Sentado , Multitud , Personas, Convención, Bueno, confundido, Utilización, Poco, Brillante, Ordinario, Silvestre, Leche, Valor, Igual, Obstinado, Sonrisa, Bebé, Nacido, Malo, Estúpido, Oscuro, Exceso, Final, Límite, Terraza, Tranquil.

 

 

"Give up learning, and put an end to your troubles.
Is there a difference between yes and no?
Is there a difference between good and evil?
Must I fear what others fear? What nonsense!
Other people are contented, enjoying the sacrificial feast of the ox.
In spring some go to the park, and climb the terrace,
But I alone am drifting, not knowing where I am.
Like a newborn babe before it learns to smile,
I am alone, without a place to go.
Others have more than they need, but I alone have nothing.
I am a fool. Oh, yes! I am confused.
Others are clear and bright,
But I alone am dim and weak.
Others are sharp and clever,
But I alone am dull and stupid.
Oh, I drift like the waves of the sea,
Without direction, like the restless wind.
Everyone else is busy,
But I alone am aimless and depressed.
I am different.
I am nourished by the great mother."
-  Translated by Gia-fu Feng and Jane English, 1989, Chapter 20 

 

 

"Abandon learnedness, and you have no vexation.
The "yes" compared with the "yea," how little do they differ!
But the good compared with the bad, how much do they differ! 
If what the people dread cannot be made dreadless, there will be desolation;
Alas! and verily, there will be no end of it. 
The multitudes of men are happy, so happy, as though celebrating a great feast.
They are as though in springtime ascending a tower.
I alone remain quiet;
Alas! like one that has not yet received an omen.
I am like unto a babe that does not yet smile.
Forlorn am I, O so forlorn!
It appears that I have no place whither I may return home.
The multitude of men all have plenty and I alone appear empty.
Alas! I am a man whose heart is foolish. 
Ignorant am I, O, so ignorant!
Common people are bright, so bright, I alone am dull.
Common people are smart, so smart, I alone am confused, so confused.
Desolate am I, alas! like the sea.
Adrift, alas! like one who has no place where to stay.
The multitude of men all possess usefulness. I alone am awkward and a rustic too.
I alone differ from others, but I prize seeking sustenance from our mother." 
-  Translated by D. T. Suzuki and Paul Carus, 1913, Chapter 20     

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"Renounce learning, it brings loss to the Inner Life.
How slight the difference between Yes and Yea!
How great the difference between Good and Evil!
That which men fear is indeed to be feared.
When men give themselves up to disorder it never stops.
Many men rejoice and rejoice over a supply of good food, over being in a high and exalted position.
I am calm, I do not feel the slightest emotion, like a new-born child which cannot yet smile at its mother, without attachment to anything, returning always to the Inner Life.
Many men have superfluous possessions.
I have nothing that I value; I desire that my heart be completely subdued, emptied to emptiness.
Men of wealth are in the daylight of prosperity.
I am in the dark.
Men of wealth are endowed with penetration.
I appear confused and ignorant.
Suddenly I am, as it were, on a vast sea, floating on the sea of Inner Life which is boundless.
Many men are full of ability.
I appear to be stupid and rustic.
Thus I am different from other men.
But I revere the Mother, Sustainer of all beings."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 20

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"Between wei and o
What after all is the difference?
Can it be compared to the difference between good and bad?
The saying “what others avoid I too must avoid”
How false and superficial it is?
All men, indeed, are wreathed in smiles,
As though feasting after the Great Sacrifice,
As though going up to the Spring Carnival.
I alone am inert, like a child that has not yet given sign;
Like an infant that has not yet smiled.
I droop and drift, as though I belonged nowhere.
All men have enough and to spare;
I alone seem to have lost everything.
Mine is indeed the mind of a very idiot,
So dull am I.
The world is full of people that shine;
I alone am dark.
They look lively and self-assured;
I alone depressed.
(I seem unsettled as the ocean;
Blown adrift, never brought to a stop.)
All men can be put to some use;
I alone am intractable and boorish.
But wherein I most am different from men
Is that I prize no sustenance that comes not from the Mother's breast."
-  Translated by Arthur Waley, 1934, Chapter 20 

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"When we renounce learning we have no troubles.
The (ready) 'yes,' and (flattering) 'yea;'
Small is the difference they display.
But mark their issues, good and ill;
What space the gulf between shall fill? 
What all men fear is indeed to be feared;
But how wide and without end is the range of questions asking to be discussed!
The multitude of men look satisfied and pleased; as if enjoying a full banquet, as if mounted on a tower in spring.
I alone seem listless and still, my desires having as yet given no indication of their presence.
I am like an infant which has not yet smiled.
I look dejected and forlorn, as if I had no home to go to.
The multitude of men all have enough and to spare.
I alone seem to have lost everything.
My mind is that of a stupid man;
I am in a state of chaos.
Ordinary men look bright and intelligent, while I alone seem to be benighted.
They look full of discrimination, while I alone am dull and confused.
I seem to be carried about as on the sea, drifting as if I had nowhere to rest.
All men have their spheres of action, while I alone seem dull and incapable, like a rude borderer.
Thus I alone am different from other men, but I value the nursing-mother Dao."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 20 

 

 

唯之與阿, 相去幾何.
善之與惡, 相去若何.
人之所畏, 不可不畏.
荒兮其未央哉.
衆人熙熙.
如享太牢.
如春登臺.
我獨怕兮其未兆, 如嬰兒之未孩.
儽儽兮若無所歸.
衆人皆有餘, 而我獨若遺.
我愚人之心也哉, 沌沌兮.
俗人昭昭.
我獨昏.
俗人察察.
我獨悶悶.
澹兮其若海.
飂兮若無止.
衆人皆有以.
而我獨頑似鄙.
我獨異於人,而貴食母.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 20

 

 

wei chih yü a, hsiang ch'ü chi ho.
shan chih yü wu, hsiang ch'ü jo ho.
jên chih so wei, pu k'o pu wei.
huang hsi ch'i wei yang tsai.
chung jên hsi hsi.
ju hsiang ta lao.
ju ch'un têng t'ai.
wo tu p'o hsi ch'i wei chao, ju ying erh chih wei hai.
lei lei hsi jo wu so kuei.
chung jên chieh yu yü, erh wo tu jo yi.
wo yü jên chih hsin yeh tsai, t'un t'un hsi.
su jên chao chao.
wo tu hun.
hun su jên ch'a ch'a.
wo tu mên mên.
tan hsi ch'i jo hai.
liu hsi jo wu chih.
chung jên chieh yu yi.
erh wo tu wan ssu pi.
wo tu yi yü jên, erh kuei shih mu.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 20 

 

 

Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 20 of the Tao Te Ching

 

 

wie zhi yu e, xiang qu ji he.
shan zhi yu e, xiang qu ruo he.
ren zhi suo wei, bu ke bu wei.
huang xi qi wei yang zai.
zhong ren xi xi.
ru xiang tai lao.
ru chun deng tai.
wo du bo xi qi wei zhao, ru ying er zhi wei hai.
lei lei xi ruo wu suo gui.
zhong ren jie you yu, er wo du ruo yi.
wo yu ren zhi xin ye zai, dun dun xi.
su ren zhao zhao.
wo du hun.
hun su ren cha cha.
wo du men men.

zhong ren jie you yi.
er wo du wan si bi.
wo du yi yu ren, er gui si mu.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 20  

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization (romanization), English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin and Wade Giles Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"Renounce knowledge and your problems will end.
What is the difference between yes and no?
What is the difference between good and evil?
Must you fear what others fear?
Nonsense, look how far you have missed the mark!

Other people are joyous,
as though they were at a spring festival.
I alone am unconcerned and expressionless,
like an infant before it has learned to smile.

Other people have more than they need;
I alone seem to possess nothing.
I am lost and drift about with no place to go.
I am like a fool, my mind is in chaos.

Ordinary people are bright;
I alone am dark.
Ordinary people are clever;
I alone am dull.
Ordinary people seem discriminating;
I alone am muddled and confused.
I drift on the waves on the ocean,
blown at the mercy of the wind.
Other people have their goals,
I alone am dull and uncouth.

I am different from ordinary people.
I nurse from the Great Mother's breasts."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 20 

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

 

                             

 

 

 

"Leave off fine learning! End the nuisance
Of saying yes to this and perhaps to that,
Distinctions with how little difference!
Categorical this, categorical that,
What slightest use are they!
If one man leads, another must follow,
How silly that is and how false!
Yet conventional men lead an easy life
With all their days feast days,
A constant spring visit to the Tall Tower,
While I am a simpleton, a do-nothing,
Not big enough yet to raise a hand,
Not grown enough to smile,
A homeless, worthless waif.
Men of the world have a surplus of goods,
While I am left out, owning nothing.
What a booby I must be
Not to know my way round,
What a fool!
The average man is so crisp and so confident
That I ought to be miserable
Going on and on like the sea,
Drifting nowhere.
All these people are making their mark in the world,
While I, pig-headed, awkward,
Different from the rest,
Am only a glorious infant still nursing at the breast."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 20

 

 

"Between yea and nay, how much difference is there?
Between good and evil, how much difference is there?
What are feared by others, we must fear.
Vastly they are unlimited!
The people in general are happy as if enjoying a great feast.
Or, as going up a tower in spring.
I alone am tranquil, and have made no signs,
Like a baby who is yet unable to smile;
Forlorn as if I had no home to go to.
Others all have more than enough,
And I alone seem to be in want.
Possibly mine is the mind of a fool,
Which is so ignorant!
The vulgar are bright,
And I alone seem to be dull.
The vulgar are discriminative, and I alone seem blunt.
I am negligent as if being obscure;
Drifting, as if being attached to nothing.
The people in general all have something to do,
And I alone seem to be impractical and awkward.
I alone am different from others.
But I value seeking sustenance from the Mother."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 20 

 

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"Eliminate (chüeh) learning so as to have no worries,
Yes and no, how far apart are they?
Good and evil, how far apart are they?
What the sages (jen) fear,
I must not not fear.
I am the wilderness (huang) before the dawn (wei yang).
The multitude (chung jen) are busy and active,
Like partaking of the sacrificial feast,
Like ascending the platform in spring;
I alone (tu) am bland (p'o),
As if I have not yet emerged (chao) into form.
Like an infant who has not yet smiled (hai),
Lost, like one who has nowhere to return (wu so kuei).
The multitudes (chung jen) all have too much (yu yü);
I alone (tu) am deficient (i).
My mind (hsin) is that of a fool (yü),
Nebulous.
Worldly people (su jen) are luminous (chao);
I alone (tu) am dark (hun).
Worldly people are clear-sighted (ch'a);
I alone (tu) am dull (men),
I am calm like the sea,
Like the high winds I never stop (chih).
The multitudes (chung jen) all have their use (i);
I alone (tu) am untamable like lowly material.
I alone (tu) am different from others.
For I treasure feeding on the Mother (mu)."
-  Translated by Ellen Marie Chen, 2000, Chapter 20

 

 

"Scholarship abandoned, sorrow vanishes.
Yes and yea, are they not almost alike?
Goodness and evil, are they not akin?
Untrammeled and without limits ?yet that may not be lightly esteemed which all men reverence.
The multitude are joyful and merry ?as though feasting on a day of sacrifice, or ascending a high tower in spring. I alone am anchored without giving any sign ?like an infant, undeveloped.
My homeless heart wanders among the things of sense, as if it had nowhere to stay.
The multitude have enough and to spare ?I alone am as one who has lost something.
Have I then the mind of a fool? Am I so very confused?
Ordinary men are bright enough. I alone am dull.
Ordinary men are full of excitement. I alone am heavy-hearted.
Boundless as the sea, drifting to and fro, as if without a place to rest.
All men have some purpose. I alone am thick-headed as a boor.
I am alone ?differing from others, in that I reverence and seek the Nursing Mother."
-  Translated by C. Spurgeon Medhurst, 1905, Chapter 20

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"On the Solitary Nature ...
Be done with rote learning
And its attendant vexations;
For is there distinction
Of a "yes" from a "yea"
Comparable now to the gulf
Between evil and good?
"What all men fear, I too must fear"-
How barren and pointless a thought!
The reveling of multitudes
At the feast of Great Sacrifice,
Or up on the terrace
At carnival in spring,
Leave me, alas, unmoved, alone,
Like a child that has never smiled.
Lazily, I drift
As though I had no home.
All others have enough to spare;
I am the one left out.
I have the mind of a fool,
Muddled and confused!
When common people scintillate
I alone make shadows.
Vulgar folks are sharp and knowing:
Only I am melancholy.
Restless like the ocean,
Blown about, I cannot stop.
Other men can find employment,
But I am stubborn; I am mean.
Alone I am and different,
Because I prize and seek
My sustenance from the Mother!"
-  Translated by Raymond Blakney, 1955, Chapter 20 

 

 

"Abolish study and you will be free from care.
"What the distinction is between 'yea' and 'aye'", "what the difference is between 'good' and 'evil'"; that "one should stand in awe of what others stand in awe of"; - how vast (is the study of these things)!
There is no end to it!
But when all men are joyous as if celebrating the Great Sacrifice or climbing the heights in spring, then I alone, - so passive, - giving no sign, like an infant that has not yet smiles; - so forlorn, - like one who has nowhere to turn! When all men have plenty, I alone am like one who is left out.
I have indeed the heart of a fool, - so obtuse!
Let ordinary men be bright and intelligent, I alone am stupid and confused.
Let ordinary men be astute and far-sighted, I alone am dull and mope-eyed.
Wan like the waning moon; adrift like one who has nowhere to rest!
Let all men have a purpose, I alone am ignorant like a boor.
I alone am different from others because I prize feeding on "the Mother". "
-  Translated by Jan J. L. Duyvendak, 1954, Chapter 20

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

 

                                     

 

 

 

"By looking always on the reality of things, and preserving the simple truth, the people will become less selfish and have fewer desires; and by pursuing their researches into the Doctrine to the utmost limit, they may avoid sorrow.
How small is the distance dividing a prompt affirmative from a sycophantic acquiescence; yet how great is that between virtue and immorality!
I cannot but fear that which is feared by others.
Their scholarship, how neglected is it!
It is still night with them.
The world is joyful and merry as on a day of sacrifice, or as those who mount a belvedere in spring-time.
I alone prefer solitude and quiet, and seek not to pry into futurity.
I am like an infant ere it has grown to be a child; listlessly I roam hither and thither, as though I had no home to go to.
The multitude have abundance and to spare; I alone am like one who has relinquished everything. Have I, therefore, the heart of a fool?
Confused and dim, while the vulgar are apparently] enlightened; I alone am in the dark.
Tossed to and fro, like the sea; roving without cessation.
The multitude have whereupon to employ their energies; I alone am doltish as a clown.
But I alone differ from all others in that I reverence my Nursing Mother."
-  Translated by Frederic Henry Balfour, 1884, Chapter 20 

 

 

"Cease learning, no more worries
Respectful response and scornful response
How much is the difference?
Goodness and evil
How much do they differ?
What the people fear, I cannot be unafraid

So desolate! How limitless it is!
The people are excited
As if enjoying a great feast
As if climbing up to the terrace in spring
I alone am quiet and uninvolved
Like an infant not yet smiling
So weary, like having no place to return
The people all have surplus
While I alone seem lacking
I have the heart of a fool indeed so ignorant!
Ordinary people are bright
I alone am muddled
Ordinary people are scrutinizing
I alone am obtuse
Such tranquility, like the ocean
Such high wind, as if without limits

The people all have goals
And I alone am stubborn and lowly
I alone am different from them
And value the nourishing mother"
-  Translated by Derek Linn, 2006, Chapter 20

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   By Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"Get rid of "learning" and there will be no anxiety.
How much difference is there between "yes" and "no"?
How far removed from each other are "good" and "evil"?
Yet what the people are in awe of cannot be disregarded.
I am scattered, never having been in a comfortable center.
All the people enjoy themselves, as if they are at the festival of the great sacrifice,
Or climbing the Spring Platform.
I alone remain, not yet having shown myself.
Like an infant who has not yet laughed.
Weary, like one despairing of no home to return to.
All the people enjoy extra
While I have left everything behind.
I am ignorant of the minds of others.
So dull!
While average people are clear and bright, I alone am obscure.
Average people know everything.
To me alone all seems covered.
So flat!
Like the ocean.
Blowing around!
It seems there is no place to rest.
Everybody has a goal in mind.
I alone am as ignorant as a bumpkin.
I alone differ from people.
I enjoy being nourished by the mother."
-  Translated by Charles Muller, 1891, Chapter 20 

 

 

"If we stop fussing about grammatical trivialities, we will get along much better.
The difference between "Yes" and "ya" is insignificant as compared with a genuine distinction like "Good" and "Bad".
Yet some people are as fearful of making a grammatical mistake as of committing a vital error.
How stupid to waste our lives in infinite details!
While others enjoy devoting themselves to ceremonious holiday celebrations, such as the spring festivals, I stay at home as unperturbed as a helpless babe.
So while others are feasting, I appear neglected.
Am I the one who is a misguided fool?
When everyone else is exuberant, I continue to be disinterested.
When everyone else is alert to the niceties of etiquette, I persist in being indifferent.
I am as unconcerned as the rolling ocean, without a care to bother me.
While others behave like busybodies, I alone remain placid and resist arousement.
How can I withstand the pressure of public opinion?
Because I am succored by Mother Nature herself."
-  Translated by Archie J. Bahm, 1958, Chapter 20 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"Cease learning many things, we shall have peace;

Between the flattering "yea" and honest "yes,"

The difference is small, but the effect

World-wide, when good or evil we reject;

The evil that men fear not, no one fears,

And wastefulness without restraint appears.

The multitude of men look satisfied,

They feed at feasts, they mount on towers of pride,

And I alone seem timorous and still,

No signs of promise act upon my will,

A babe not yet matured, sad and forlorn,

Without a home, to desolation born.

The multitude of men have goods to spare,

Tis only I who wander everywhere

Bereft of all, with dull and stupid gaze,

Myself a chaos and my mind a maze.

The multitude of common men are bright,

And critical and keen, and full of light,

While I alone confused appear to be,

Drifting about on some dark, lonely sea;

The multitude on doing things are bent,

While I alone appear incompetent,

A rustic rude, I differ from all others,

But oh! the food I prize and seek is Our Eternal Mother's."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 20 

 

 

 

 

"Give up learning, and you will be free from all your worries.
What is the difference between yes and no about which the rhetoricians have so much to say?
What is the difference between good and evil on which the critics never agree?
These are futilities that prevent the mind from being free.
Now freedom of mind is necessary to enter into relation with the Principle.
Without doubt, among the things which common people fear, there are things that should be feared; but not as they do, with a mind so troubled that they lose their mental equilibrium.
Neither should one permit oneself to lose equilibrium through pleasure, as happens to those who have a good meal or view the surrounding countryside in spring from the top of a tower with the accompaniment of wine, etc.).
I, the Sage, seem to be colourless and undefined; neutral as a new-born child that has not yet experienced any emotion; without design or aim.
The common people abound in varied knowledge, but I am poor having rid myself of all uselessness and seem ignorant, so much have I purified myself.
They seem full of light, I seem dull.
They seek and scrutinize, I remain concentrated in myself.
Indeterminate, like the immensity of the oceans, I float without stopping.
They are full of talent, whereas I seem limited and uncultured.
I differ thus from the common people, because I venerate and imitate the universal nourishing mother, the Principle."
-  Translated by Derek Bryce, 1999, Chapter 20

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español

 

Lao Tsé. Tao Te Ching   Translated into Spanish by Anton Teplyy  

Tao Te Ching   Translated by Stephen Mitchell, Spanish version

Tao Te Ching   Translated into Spanish by Father Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons  

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Translated by Yuanxiang Xu and Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Translations into the Spanish Language

Tao Te Ching   Translated by William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Translated by Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu


 

                                      

 

 

 

"Suprime el estudio y no habrá preocupaciones.
¿Qué diferencia hay entre el sí y el no?
¿Qué diferencia hay entre el bien y el mal?
No es posible dejar de temer
lo que los hombres temen.
No es posible abarcar todo el saber.
Todo el mundo se enardece y disfruta,
como cuando se presencia un gran sacrificio,
o como cuando se sube a una torre en primavera.
Sólo yo quedo impasible,
como el recién nacido que aún no sabe sonreír.
Como quien no sabe adónde dirigirse,
como quien no tiene hogar.
Todo el mundo vive en la abundancia,
sólo yo parezco desprovisto.
Mi espíritu está turbado
como el de un ignorante.
Todo el mundo está esclarecido,
sólo yo estoy en tinieblas.
Todo el mundo resulta penetrante,
sólo yo soy torpe.
Como quien deriva en alta mar.
Todo el mundo tiene algo que hacer,
sólo yo soy un inútil.
Sólo yo soy diferente a todos los demás
porque aprecio a la Madre que me nutre."
-  Spanish Version Online at RatMachines, Chapter 20 

 

 

"Suprime el adoctrinamiento y no habrá preocupaciones.
¿Qué diferencia hay entre el sí y el no?
¿Qué diferencia hay entre el bien y el mal?
¡El dicho “lo que otros evitan, yo también deberé evitar”
cuán falso y superficial es!
No es posible abarcar todo el saber.
Todo el mundo se distrae y disfruta,
como cuando se presencia un gran sacrificio,
o como cuando se sube a los jardines de una torre en primavera.
Sólo yo doy cabida a la duda,
no copiando lo que otros hacen,
como un recién nacido que aún no sabe sonreír.
Como quien no sabe a dónde dirigirse,
como quien no tiene hogar.
Todo el mundo vive en la abundancia,
sólo yo parezco desprovisto.
Consideran mi mente como la de un loco
por sentir umbrías confusiones y críticas.
Todo el mundo brilla porque solo las luces buscan,
sólo yo me atrevo a transitar por las tinieblas.
Todo el mundo se conforma con su felicidad,
sólo yo me adentro en mi depresión.
Soy como quien deriva en alta mar,
voy contra la corriente sin un rumbo predestinado.
Todo el mundo es puesto en algún uso;
sólo yo soy un ermitaño intratable y aburrido.
Sólo yo soy diferente a todos los demás
porque aprecio a la Madre Naturaleza que me nutre."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Capitulo 20 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #21

Previous Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #19

Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 20

 

Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin romanization (Romanization) of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization (romanization), English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Concordance to the Daodejing


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles romanization (Romanization), and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  VSCL.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi)  226-249 CE  Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 20 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6 


Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse  The largest collection of very nicely formatted complete versions of the Tao Te Ching.  The collection includes 209 complete versions in 27 languages, plus 28 Chinese versions.  There are 112 English language versions of the Tao Te Ching available at this website.  A variety of search methods and comparison methods are provided, as well a a detailed index.  Offline as of 25 May 2013. 


Tao Te Ching English Translations from Terebess Asia Online.  Over 30 translations. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 20, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching

Research by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

This webpage was last modified or updated on January 12, 2014. 
This webpage was first distributed online on February 2, 2011.


Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

 

 

Michael P. Garofalo's E-mail

Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

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Study Chi Kung or Tai Chi with Mike Garofalo

 

 


Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides

Cloud Hands Blog

Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

One Old Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81