Chapter 37

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

Chapter 36     Chapter 38     Index to All the Chapters     Taoism     Cloud Hands Blog

English     Chinese     Spanish

 

 

Chapter 37

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 



End of the Book of the Dao (Way or Path) of the Daodejing (Tao Te Ching), Classic of the Way and Virtue
Book of the Dao
(Way or Path) =  Chapters 1-37.   Book of the Te (Virtue or Power) = Chapters 38-81. 


English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Simplicity, Government, Tao, Active, Reform, Always or Eternal (ch'ang), Rest, Still, Tranquility, Administration of Government, Taking No Action (Wu Wei), Natural, Natural or Spontaneous (tzu), Hold or Uphold (shou), Without or No (wu), Uncontrolled, Nature, Tao, Nothing Undone, Freedom, Non-Assertion, Wood, Uncarved Block of Wood or Simple or Uncut (p'u), Ten Thousand Things (wan wu), Nameless, Can or Able (nêng), Equilibrium, Prince or Baron (hou), King or Ruler (wang), Transformation (hua), Name (ming), Princes, Restrain or Subdue (chên), Rectify, Will or Would (chiang), Regeneration, Quiet or Still or Tranquil (ching), Desire or Tendencies (yü), Lust, Stir or Arise (tso), Heaven (t'ien), Calmness, Exercise of Leadership, Settled or Anchored (ting),   為政    

Términos en Español:  Simplicidad, Gobierno, Reforma, Activo, Naturaleza, Tranquilidad, Administración de Gobierno, Libertad, Madera, Sin Tallar, Bloqueo, Sin Nombre, Equilibrium, Reyes, Transformación, Príncipe, Rectificar, Regeneración, Tranquilo, Deseo, Lujuria, Calma, Liderazgo, Natural, Naturalidad, Espontánea, No Controlada, Naturaleza, Siempre, Eterno, Sin, Príncipe, Barón, Gobernante, Poder, Capaz, Retener, Sostener, Cosas, Tendencias, Revolver, Surgir, Ojalá, Refrenar, strian, Sojuzgar, Nombre, Sencillo, sin Cortar, Prístina, Naturaleza, Tranquilidad, Cielo, Colocado, Anclado. 

 

 

 

 

"The Tao in its regular course does nothing for the sake of doing it, and so there is nothing which it does not do.
If princes and kings were able to maintain it, all things would of themselves be transformed by them.
If this transformation became to me an object of desire, I would express the desire by the nameless simplicity.
Simplicity without a name
Is free from all external aim.
With no desire, at rest and still,
All things go right as of their will."  
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 37 

 

 

"The Tao is ever inactive; yet there is nothing it does not do.
If feudal Princes and Sovereigns can but preserve it, all creatures will reform themselves.
But if, once reformed, desires should again arise,
I would restrain them by the exercise of the Simplicity which is without a name.
This nameless Simplicity will prevent the rise of desires;
An absence of desire will produce quiescence.
Then the Empire will become settled of its own accord."
-  Translated by Frederic Henry Balfour, 1884, Chapter 37

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"The Way never does anything,
and everything gets done.
If those is power could hold to the Way,
the ten-thousand things
would look after themselves.
If even so they tried to act,
I'd quiet them with the nameless,
the natural. 
In the unnamed, in the unshapen,
is not wanting.
In not wanting is stillness.
In stillness all under heaven rests."
-  Rendition by Ursula K. Le Guin, 2009, Chapter 37 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"The Way takes no action, but leaves nothing undone.
When you accept this
The world will flourish,
In harmony with nature.
Nature does not possess desire;
Without desire, the heart becomes quiet;
In this manner the whole world is made tranquil."
-  Interpolated by Peter Merel, 1992, Chapter 37 

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons


                             

 

 

 

"Reason always practices non-assertion, and there is nothing that remains undone.   
If princes and kings could keep Reason, the ten thousand creatures would of themselves be reformed.
While being reformed they might yet be anxious to stir; but I would restrain them by the simplicity of the Ineffable.
The simplicity of the unexpressed
Will purify the heart of lust.
Is there no lust there will be rest,
And all the world will thus be blest."
-  Translated by Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki and Paul Carus, 1913, Chapter 37 

 

 

道常無為, 而無不為. 
侯王若能守之, 萬物將自化. 
化而欲作, 吾將鎮之以無名之樸. 
無名之樸, 夫亦將無欲. 
不欲以靜, 天下將自定. 
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 37

 

tao ch'ang wu wei, erh wu pu wei.
hou wang jo nêng shou chih, wan wu chiang tzu hua.
hua erh yü tso, wu chiang chên chih yi wu ming chih p'u.
wu ming chih p'u, fu yi chiang wu yü.
pu yü yi ching, t'ien hsia chiang tzu ting.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 37

 


Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 37 of the Tao Te Ching

 


dao chang wu wei, er wu bu wei.
hou wang ruo neng shou zhi, wan wu jiang zi hua.
hua er yu zuo, wu jiang zhen zhi yi wu ming zhi pu.
wu ming zhi pu, fu yi jiang bu yu.
bu yu yi jing, tian xia jiang zi ding.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 37 
 
 
 
 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin and Wade Giles Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"Tao is never active, but there is nothing it does not do.
If princes and kings could hold onto it, all things would develop by themselves.
When they develop, the desire in them would emerge,
I would restrain them with simplicity,
So simple that it does not even have a name,
In order to liberate them from desire.
Free of desire, they would be soaked in tranquillity,
And thus the world would attain purity and virtue.
Simplicity, however unimportant it may be,
Cannot be subdued even by the entire world.
If princes and kings could hold onto it,
Everything in the world, of its own accord, would pay homage.
Heaven and earth would unite to sprinkle dew, sweeter than honey, on the ground.
Without anyone ordering them to do so, people would attain harmony by themselves.
With the mission accomplished and the objectives achieved,
People would see themselves as following in nature's footsteps."
-  Translated by Chohan Chou-Wing, Chapter 37 


 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching  Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni.
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu  Translated by Brian Walker. 
Tao - The Way  Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles.  
Taoism: An Essential Guide  By Eva Wong. 

 

                                 

 

 

 

"The Tao eternally non-acts, and so

It does nothing and yet there is nothing left to do;

If prince or king could keep it, all would change

Of their own accord with a transformation strange.

 

And so transformed, should desire to change again still come to be,

I would quiet such desire by the Nameless One' s simplicity,

But the Nameless One' s simplicity is free from all desire,

So tranquilly, of their own accord, all things would still transpire."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 37

 

 

"Way-making is really nameless.
Were the nobles and kings able to respect this,
All things would be able to develop along their own lines.
Having developed along their own lines, were they to desire to depart from this,
I would realign them
With a nameless scarp of unworked wood.
Realigned with this nameless scrap of unworked wood,
They would leave off desiring.
Is not desiring, they would achieve equilibrium,
And all the world would be properly ordered of its own accord."
-  Translated by Roger T. Ames and Donald L. Hall, 2003, Chapter 37 

 

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Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"The Way is eternally nameless.
If feudal lords and kings preserve it,
The myriad creatures will be transformed by themselves.
After transformation, if they wish to rise up,
I shall restrain them with the nameless unhewn log.
By restraining them with the nameless unhewn log,
They will not feel disgraced;
Not feeling disgraced,
They will be still,
Whereupon heaven and earth will be made right by themselves."
-  Translated by Victor H. Mair, 1990, Chapter 37 

 

 

"The Tao never acts with force,
yet there is nothing that it can not do.

If rulers could follow the way of the Tao,
then all of creation would willingly follow their example.
If selfish desires were to arise after their transformation,
I would erase them with the power of the Uncarved Block.

By the power of the Uncarved Block,
future generations would lose their selfish desires.
By losing their selfish desires,
the world would naturally settle into peace."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 37  

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"Tao remains quiescent, and yet leaves nothing undone.
If a ruler or a king could hold it, all things would of their own accord assume the desired shape.
If in the process of transformation desire should arise, I would check it by the ineffable simplicity.
The ineffable simplicity would bring about an absence of desire, and rest would come back again.
Thus the world would regenerate itself."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn-Old, 1904, Chapter 37

 

 

"The Tao proceedeth by its own nature, doing nothing; therefore there is
no doing which it comprehendeth not.
If kings and princes were to govern in this manner, all things would
operate aright by their own motion.
If this transmutation were my object, I should call it Simplicity.
Simplicity hath no name nor purpose; silently and at ease all things go well."
-  Translated by Aleister Crowley, 1918, Chapter 37  

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

 

                                     

 

 

 

"The activity of Everlasting Tao is in the Inner Kingdom,
It does not act except through the innermost.
If prince and people can maintain it together,
All beings will be transformed from within themselves;
Being transformed, they again desire action.
We must learn to still desire
To obtain in the Inner Life Purity of the Name.
Purity of the Name in the Inner Life
Brings absence of desire;
Absence of desire brings stillness;
Thus shall the world be perfected from within itself."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 37 

 

 

"Tao never does anything,
And everything gets done.
If rulers can keep to it,
The ten thousand things will changes of themselves.
Changed, things may start to stir.
Quiet them with the namelessly simple,
Which alone will bring no-desire.
No-desire: then there is peace,
And beneath-heaven will settle down of itself."
-  Translated by Herrymoon Maurer, 1985, Chapter 37

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   By Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"Tao is ever inactive, and yet there is nothing that it does not do.
If princes and kings could keep to it, all things would of themselves become developed.
When they are developed, desire would stir in them;
I would restrain them by the nameless Simplicity,
In order to make them free from desire.
Free from desire, they would be at rest;
And the world would of itself become rectified.
However insignificant Simplicity seems, the whole world can not make it submissive.
If princes and kings could keep to it,
All things in the world would of themselves pay homage.
Heaven and earth would unite to send down sweet dew.
The people with no one to command them would of themselves become harmonious.
When merits are accomplished and affairs completed,
The people would speak of themselves as following nature."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 37 

 

 

"The Tao is always "not-doing"
Yet there is nothing it doesn't do.
If the ruler is able to embody it
Everything will naturally change.

Being changed, they desire to act.

So I must restrain them, using the nameless "uncarved block (original mind)."

Using the nameless uncarved block
They become desireless.
Desireless, they are tranquil and
All-under-Heaven is naturally settled."
-  Translated by Charles Muller, 1891, Chapter 37 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"The Tao is eternally actionless and the cause of all action!
Were princes and monarchs able to acquiesce the myriad existences would by degrees spontaneously transform.
Transforming and wishing to function I would immediately guide by the simplicity of the nameless.
The simplicity of the nameless is akin to desirableness.
Desireless and at rest the world would naturally become peaceful."
-  Translated by C. Spurgeon Medhurst, 1905, Chapter 37

 

 

"The Tao never strives, yet nothing is left undone.
If leaders were able to adhere to it the ten thousand things
would develop of their own accord.
If after they have developed
they experience desires to strive,
they can bury those desires
under the nameless Uncarved Block.
The nameless Uncarved Block can protect against desire.
When desires are restrained there will be peace,
and then all under heaven will be at rest."
-  Translated by Tolbert McCarroll, 1982, Chapter 37  

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

 

"El Tao no actúa, y así no deja nada por hacer.
Si uno entiende esto
Todas las cosas del Mundo florecen naturalmente;
Floreciendo, solo están restringidas por la Naturaleza.

La Naturaleza no tiene deseos;
Sin deseos, el corazón alcanza la tranquilidad,
Y así el Mundo en su totalidad puede permanecer en calma."
-  Translated by Antonio Rivas Gonzálvez, 1998, Capitulo 37

 

 

"El Tao, por su naturaleza, no actúa,
pero nada hay que no sea hecho por él.
Si los príncipes y los reyes
pudieran adherírsele,
todos los seres evolucionarían por sí mismos.
Si al evolucionar aún persistiera el deseo codicioso,
yo los retornaría a la simplicidad sin nombre.
En la simplicidad sin nombre no existe el deseo.
Sin deseos es posible la paz
y el mundo se ordenaría por sí mismo."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Capitulo 37

 

 

 

 

 

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Previous Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #36

Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 37

 

Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español


Concordance to the Daodejing


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 37 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi.  Seven Star Communications, 2006, 240 pages. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept


Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse  The largest collection of very nicely formatted complete versions of the Tao Te Ching.  The collection includes 209 complete versions in 27 languages, plus 28 Chinese versions.  There are 112 English language versions of the Tao Te Ching available at this website.  A variety of search methods and comparision methods are provided, as well a a detailed index.  Offline as of 5/14/2013.


Tao Te Ching English Translations from Terebess Asia Online.  Over 30 translations. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 37, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 

 

 

Commentary on Chapter 37

 

“The Daojia do nothing, but they also say that nothing is left undone. Their substance is easy to practice, but their words are difficult to understand. Their techniques take emptiness and nothingness as the foundation and adaptation and compliance as the application. They have no set limits, no regular forms, and so are able to penetrate to the genuine basis of living things. Because they neither anticipate things nor linger over them, they are able to become the masters of all living things.

They have methods that are no methods:
They take adapting to the seasons as their practice.
They have limits that are no limits:
They adapt to things by harmonizing with them.
Therefore they say:
The sage is not clever:
The seasonal alternations are what the sage preserves.
Emptiness is the constant in the Way.
Adaptation is the guiding principle of the ruler.”
Classical Daoism ― Is There Really Such a Thing?  By Scott "Bao Pu" Barnwell

 

 

 

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2014. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

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This webpage was last modified or updated on October 31, 2014.   
This webpage was first distributed online on April 11, 2011. 
 

 

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Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

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Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides

Cloud Hands Blog

Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

One Old Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81