Chapter 23

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

Chapter 22     Chapter 24     Index to All the Chapters     Taoism     Cloud Hands Blog

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Chapter 23

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu


 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Quiet, Happiness or Enjoyment (lo), Dao, Reason, Faith or Trust (hsin), Events, Flow, Change, Causes or Makes (wei), Virtue or Power or Te (), Trust, Good Associations, Loss or Failure (shih), Heaven (t'ien), Earth (ti), Friendships, Worthy, Way, Man or Human (jên), Ancient or Persisting (chiu), Reticence, Wind (fêng), Lifestyle or Daily Activities (shih), Little or Few (hsi), Tao, Eternal, Cloudbursts, Rain or Downpour (), Indeed (yen), Nature (jan), Spontaneous, Intelligence, Day (jih), Accord, Identify or Align (t'ung), Conformity, Follows or Devotes (ts'ung), Acceptance or Obtain (), Failure, Morning (chao), Taciturn, Words or Speak (yen), Sage, Sufficient or Adequate (tsu), Transitory, Power, Receive (yu), Adaptation, Teh,  虛無  


Términos en Español: 
Tranquilo, Felicidad, Disfrute, Razon, Fe, Flujo, Corriente, Cambio, Virtud, Confianza, Amistad, Pérdida, Cielo, Tierra, Camino, Vía, Hacer, Método, Reticencia, Viento, Eterno, Chaparrón, Chubasco, Lluvia, Naturaleza, Espontáneo, Esencia, Inteligencia, Acuerdo, Pacto, Conformidad, Aceptación, Fracaso, Manaña, Taciturno, Sabio, Sensado, Santo, Transitorio, Poder, Día, Causa, Energía, Potencia, Palabras, Letras, Antiguo, Hombre, Persona, Sigue, Dedica, Estilo de Vida, Indetificar, Obtener, Adaptación, Recibir, Claro Qi Si, Suficiente.    

 

 

"To talk little is natural.
High winds do not last all morning.
Heavy rain does not last all day.
Why is this? Heaven and Earth!
If heaven and Earth cannot make things eternal,
How is it possible for man?
He who follows the Tao
Is at one with the Tao.
He who is virtuous
Experiences Virtue.
He who loses the way
Is lost.
When you are at one with the Tao,
The Tao welcomes you.
When you are at one with Virtue,
The Virtue is always there.
When you are at one with loss,
The loss is experienced willingly.
He who does not trust enough
Will not be trusted."
-   Translated by Gia-fu Feng and Jane English, 1989, Chapter 23  

 

 

"Abstaining from speech marks him who is obeying the spontaneity of his nature.
A violent wind does not last for a whole morning; a sudden rain does not last for the whole day.
To whom is it that these two things are owing?
To Heaven and Earth. If Heaven and Earth cannot make such acting last long, how much less can man!
Therefore when one is making the Tao his business, those who are also pursuing it, agree with him in it.
Those those who are making the manifestation of its course their object agree with him in that.
While even those who are failing in both these things agree with him where they fail. 
Hence, those with whom he agrees as to the Tao have the happiness of attaining to it.
Those with whom he agrees as to its manifestation have the happiness of attaining to it.
Those with whom he agrees in their failure have also the happiness of attaining it. 
When there is not faith sufficient on his part, a want of faith in him ensues on the part of the others."
-   Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 23  

 

 

"Nature says few words.
A whirlwind does not last all morning,
nor does a rainstorm last a whole day.
What causes them? Nature.
If even Nature's utterances do not last long,
how much less should human beings'?
Those who follow the Way are one with the Way.
Those who follow power are one with power.
Those who abandon it are one with abandonment.
Those one with the Way are welcomed by the Way.
Those one with power are welcomed by power.
Those one with abandonment are welcomed by abandonment.
Those who lack trust will not be trusted."
-  Translated by Sanderson Beck, 1996, Chapter 23
 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"To be taciturn is the natural way.
A hurricane: does not outlast the morning.
A cloudburst does not outlast the day. 
Who causes these events but heaven and earth?
If even heaven and earth cannot be unremitting, will not man be much less so?   
Those who pursue their business in Reason, men of Reason, associate in Reason.
Those who pursue their business in virtue associate in virtue.
Those who pursue their business in ill luck associate in ill luck.
When men associate in Reason, Reason makes them glad to find companions.
When men associate in virtue, virtue makes them glad to find companions.
When men associate in ill luck, ill luck makes them glad to find companions. 
If your faith is insufficient, verily shall ye receive no faith."
-   Translated by Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki and Paul Carus, 1913, Chapter 23

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"Reticence in speech leads to spontaneity.
A boisterous wind does not continue after dawn; a deluge of rain does not outlast the day.
Who is it that produces these two phenomena?—Heaven and Earth.
Seeing, then, that the forces of nature cannot last for ever, how much less can man?  
Wherefore among those who order their affairs in accordance with Tao, those who understand the doctrine are identified with Tao.
Those who are possessed of virtue are identified with the Virtue or attributes of Tao; while those who lose both are identified with their loss.
But, they do not recognize it as being loss.  
Those who become thus identified with Tao are also received joyfully by those who already possess the Tao. 
Those who become identified with its Virtue are also received joyfully by those who already possess the Virtue.
The loss sustained by those who are identified with the loss of both is also rejoiced in by those who are already in the same case. 
Where there is insufficiency of faith on the part of one, there will result an entire absence of faith on the part of others."
-   Translated by Frederic H. Balfour, 1884, Chapter 23    

 

 

"Boisterous gales do not continue unabated from morn till eve.
Torrential rainfalls do not continue unabated throughout the day and night.
Who is it that produces these phenomena?
Heaven and earth.
Since these phenomena cannot last for ever, how much less can the work of man!
Those who follow the way of Truth will meet in Truth.
Those who follow the way of virtue will meet in virtue.
Those who follow the way of Heaven will meet in Heaven.
Those who meet in Truth become one with Truth, and they rejoice in it.
Those who meet in virtue become virtuous, and they rejoice in it.
Those who meet in Heaven become heavenly, and they rejoice in it."
-  Translated by Cheng Lin, Chapter 23 

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"Sparing indeed is the Nature of its Talk ...
Sparing indeed is nature of its talk:
The whirlwind will not last the morning out;
The cloudburst ends before the day is done.
What is it that behaves itself like this?
The earth and sky! And if it be that these
Cut short their speech, how much more yet should man!
If you work by the Way,
You will be of the Way;
If you work through its virtue
you will be given the virtue;
Abandon either one
And both abandon you.
Gladly then the Way receives
Those who choose to walk in it;
Gladly too its power upholds
Those who choose to use it well;
Gladly will abandon greet
Those who to abandon drift.
Little faith is put in them
Whose faith is small."
-  Translated by Raymond Blackney, 1955, Chapter 23

 

 

 

A Chinese Language Version of Chapter 23 of the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
A note on my style of displaying the Chinese characters of the Tao Te Ching

 

 

希言自然.
故飄風不終朝.
驟雨不終日.
孰為此者, 天地.
天地尚不能久.
而況於人乎.
故從事於道者.
道者同於道.
德者同於德.
失者同於失.
同於道者, 道亦樂得之.
同於德者, 德亦樂得之.
同於失者, 失亦樂得之.
信不足焉, 有不信焉.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 23

 

 

hsi yen tzu jan.
ku p'iao fêng pu chung chao.
chou yü pu chung jih. 
shu wei tz'u chê, t'ien ti.
t'ien ti shang pu nêng chiu.
erh k'uang yü jên hu.
ku ts'ung shih yü tao chê.
tao chê t'ung yü tao.
tê chê t'ung yü tê.
shih chê t'ung yü shih. 
t'ung yü tao chê, tao yi lo tê chih.
tung yü tê chê, tê yi lo tê chih.    
t'ung yü shih chê, shih yi lo tê chih.
hsin pu tsu yen, yu pu hsin yen.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 23
 

 

Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 23 of the Tao Te Ching

 

 

xi yan zi ran.
gu piao feng bu zhong zhao.
zhou yu bu zhong ri.
shu wei ci zhe, tian di.
tian di shang bu neng jiu.
er kuang yu ren hu.
gu cong shi yu dao zhe.
dao zhe tong yu dao.
de zhe tong yu de.
shi zhe tong yu shi.
tong yu dao zhe, dao yi le de zhi.
tong yu de zhe, de yi le de zhi.
tong yu shi zhe, shi yi le de zhi.
xin bu zu yan, you bu xin yan!
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 23 

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin and Wade Giles Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

 

"To use words but rarely
Is to be natural.
Hence a gusty wind cannot last all morning, and a sudden downpour cannot last all day.
Who is it that produces these? Heaven and earth.
If even heaven and earth cannot go on forever, much less can man.
That is why one follows the way.
A man of the way conforms to the way;
A man of virtue conforms to virtue;
A man of loss conforms to loss.
He who conforms to the way is gladly accepted by the way;
He who conforms to virtue is gladly accepted by virtue;
He who conforms to loss is gladly accepted by loss.
When there is not enough faith, there is lack of good faith."
-  Translated by D. C. Lau, 1963, Chapter 23 

 

 

"To be always talking goes against nature.
For the same reason a good whirlwind never lasts the whole morning, nor a swell rainstorm the whole day.
The wind and rain emerge from nature.
And if even nature can't blow, last or pour for long, how much less should man-given tenets?
So, he who takes to or follows the Dao, becomes merged with this Dao.  
Or if one uses Dao as one's instrument, the results will be like Dao.
Who follows virtue, is soaked by it.
If one uses the power as one's instrument, the results will be like the power.
If one uses what's the reverse of the power, the results will be the reverse of the power.
Who is Dao identified, could be glad as well.
For to those who have conformed themselves to Dao, the Dao readily lends its power.
To those who have conformed themselves to the power, the power readily lends more power.
While to those who conform themselves to inefficacy, inefficacy readily lends its ineffectiveness.
Who has not enough faith will not be able to get faith.
Or: By not believing in people you turn them into liars."
-  Translated by Bryn Tormod, 1997, Chapter 23

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"Only simple and quiet words will ripen of themselves.
For a whirlwind does not last a whole morning.
A sudden rain does not last a whole day.
Who is their creator?
Heaven-and-Earth!
Even Heaven-and-Earth cannot make such violent things last long;
The same is true of the reckless efforts of humans.
Who helps the Tao (the Laws of the Universe) is one with the Tao (the Laws of the Universe);
Who thinks with Power is one with Power;
And who seeks the hand of loss is one with Loss.
To be one with the Tao (the Laws of the Universe) is to be a welcome addition to
the Tao (the Laws of the Universe);
To be one with Power is to be a welcome addition to Power;
To be one with Loss is to be a welcome addition to Loss.
Failure of faith on your part creates faithlessness on the part of others."
-  Translated by John Trottier, 1994, Chapter 23 

 

 

"Rare words are natural.
So the fluttering winds do not last all morning
    The sudden rainstorm does not last all day.
Who is it that acts this way?
    Heavens and earth.

Heavens and earth still lack the ability for longevity
    Yet what relates to men is equal to this state of things?

So follow effort in things related to tao
    Be together with relating to tao
Follow effort in things related to the ideal
    Be together with relating to the ideal
Follow effort in things related to losing
    Be together with relating to losing.

What is together with things related to tao
    Tao also obtains joyfully
What is together with things related to the ideal
    The ideal also obtains joyfully
What is together with things related to losing
    Losing also obtains joyfully.

Belief without enough within
    A lack of belief in what is within happens."
-  Translated by David Lindauer, Chapter 23 

 

 

"Nature says few words:
Hence it is that a squall lasts not a whole morning.
A rainstorm continues not a whole day.
Where do they come from?
From Nature.
Even Nature does not last long (in its utterances),
   How much less should human beings?

Therefore it is that:
   He who follows the Tao is identified with the Tao.
   He who follows Character (Teh) is identified with Character.
   He who abandons (Tao) is identified with abandonment (of Tao).
He who is identified with Tao -
   Tao is also glad to welcome him.
He who is identified with character -
   Character is also glad to welcome him.
He who is identified with abandonment -
   Abandonment is also glad t welcome him.
He who has not enough faith
   Will not be able to command faith from others."
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1955, Chapter 23 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

 

                             

 

 

 

"Things which act naturally do not need to be told how to act.
The wind and rain begin without being ordered, and quit without being commanded.
This is the way with all natural beginnings and endings.
If Nature does not have to instruct the wind and the rain, how much less should man try to direct them?
Whoever acts naturally is Nature itself acting.
And whoever acts unintelligently is unintelligence in action.
By acting naturally, one reaps Nature's rewards.
So by acting intelligently, one achieves intelligent goals.
Whereas by acting unintelligently, one comes to an unintelligent end.
Those who do not trust Nature as a model cannot be trusted as guides."
-   Translated by Archie J. Bahm, 1958, Chapter 23 

 

 

"The "inaudible" is a way of referring to the Natural.
Thus a whirlwind does not last an entire morning, and a rainstorm does not last an entire day.
What is it that causes them?
It is Heaven and Earth.
If even Heaven and Earth cannot make them last long, how much less can man?
Thus, to undertake things in accordance with the Dao, the man of Dao becomes one with the Dao.
The man of virtue becomes one with virtue.
The man of failure becomes one with failure.
He who becomes one with virtue, the Dao also endows with virtue;
he who becomes one with failure, the Dao also endows with failure.
If one fails to have trust, a corresponding lack of trust in him occurs."
-  Translated by Richard John Linn, Chapter 23

 

 

"Taciturnity is natural to man.
A whirlwind never outlasts the morning, nor a violent rain the day.
What is the cause?
It is heaven and earth.
If even heaven and earth are not constant, much less can man be.

Therefore he who pursues his affairs in the spirit of Tao will become Tao-like.
He who pursues his affairs with teh, will become teh-like.
He who pursues his affairs with loss, identifies himself with loss.

He who identifies himself with Tao, Tao rejoices to guide.
He who identifies himself with teh, teh rejoices to reward.
And he who identifies himself with loss, loss rejoices to ruin.

If his faith fail, he will receive no reward of faith."
-  Translated by Dwight Goddard and Henri Borel, 1919, Chapter 23

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"Nature does not have to insist,
Can blow for only half a morning,
Rain for only half a day,
And what are these winds and these rains but natural?
If nature does not have to insist,
Why should man?
It is natural too
That whoever follows the way of life feels alive,
That whoever uses it properly feels well used,
Whereas he who loses the way of life feels lost,
That whoever keeps to the way of life
Feels at home,
Whoever uses it properly
Feels welcome,
Whereas he who uses it improperly
Feels improperly used:
'Fail to honor people,
They fail to honor you."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 23

 

 

"Nature speaks (yen) little.
Hence a squall lasts not a whole morning,
A rainstorm continues not a whole day.
What causes (wei) these?
Heaven and earth.
Even [the actions of] heaven and earth do not last long,
How much less [the works] of humans?
Therefore one who follows Tao identifies with Tao,
One who follows te (nature) identifies with te (nature).
One who follows shih (loss) identifies with shih.
One who identifies with Tao is glad to be with Tao.
One who identifies with te is glad to be with te.
One who identifies with shih is glad to be with shih.
When you don't trust (hsin) (the people) enough,
Then they are untrustworthy (pu hsin)."
-  Translated by Ellen Marie Chen, 2000, Chapter 23

 

 

"To be always talking is against nature.
For the same reason a hurricane never lasts a whole morning,
Nor a rainstorm all day.
Who is it that makes the wind and rain?
It is Heaven-and Earth.
And if even Heaven-and Earth cannot blow or pour for long,
How much less in his utterance should man?
Truly, if one uses the Way as one's instrument,
The results will be like the Way;
If one uses the “power” as instrument,
The results will be like the “power”.
If one uses what is the reverse of the “power”,
The results will be the reverse of the “power”.
For to those who have conformed themselves to the Way,
The Way readily lends its power.
To those who have conformed themselves to the power,
The power readily, lends more power.
While to those who conform themselves to inefficacy,
Inefficacy readily lends its ineffectiveness.
“It is by not believing in people that you turn them into liars.”"
-  Translated by Arthur Waley, 1934, Chapter 23

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

 

                                     

 

 

 

"Moderate your speech, and preserve yourself.
A hurricane will not outlast the morning, a heavy rain will not outlast the day.
Who have the power to make these things but Heaven and Earth?
And if Heaven and Earth cannot continue them long, how shall a man do so?
If a man accords with Tao in all things, he is identified with Tao by that agreement.
A virtuous man is identified with virtue, a vicious man is identified with vice.
Whoever is identified with Tao, him do the Taoists receive with gladness.
Whoever is identified with virtue, him do the virtuous receive with gladness.
But whoever is identified with vice, him do the vicious gladly serve with vice.
For wherever confidence is lacking, it is not met with trust."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 23

 

 

"To be sparing of speech is natural.
A whirlwind does not last the whole morning,
A downpour does not last the whole day.
Who causes them?
If even heaven and earth cannot cause them to persist, how much less can human beings?
Therefore,
In pursuing his affairs,
a man of the Way identifies with the Way,
a man of integrity identifies with integrity,
a man who fails identifies with failure.
To him who identifies with integrity, the Way awards integrity;
To him who identifies with failure, the Way awards failure."
-  Translated by Victor H. Mair, 1990, Chapter 23

 

 

"Nature rarely talks in words.
High winds do not last all morning.
Heavy rain does not last all day.
These are nature's words.
If even nature cannot make them last,
How much less can man?
Following Tao, you are identified with Tao.
Following power, you are identified with power.
Abandoning Tao, you are identified with loss.
Identify with Tao, and Tao welcomes you.
Identify with power, and power welcomes you.
Identify with loss, and loss welcomes you.
If you don't trust enough, you won't be trusted."
-  Translated by Ned Ludd, Chapter 23  

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   By Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"To speak little is natural.
Therefore a gale does not blow a whole morning
Nor does a downpour last a whole day.
Who does these things? Heaven and Earth.
If even Heaven and Earth cannot force perfect continuity
How can people expect to?
Therefore there is such a thing as aligning one's actions with the Tao.
If you accord with the Tao you become one with it.
If you accord with virtue you become one with it.
If you accord with loss you become one with it.
The Tao accepts this accordance gladly.
Virtue accepts this accordance gladly.
Loss also accepts accordance gladly.
If you are untrustworthy, people will not trust you."
-  Translated by Charles Muller, 1891, Chapter 23

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

 

"Macht selten die Worte,
dann geht alles von selbst.
Ein Wirbelsturm dauert keinen Morgen lang.
Ein Platzregen dauert keinen Tag.
Und wer wirkt diese?
Himmel und Erde.
Was nun selbst Himmel und Erde nicht dauernd vermögen,
wieviel weniger kann das der Mensch?
Darum: Wenn du an dein Werk gehst mit dem Sinn,
so wirst du mit denen, so den Sinn haben, eins im Sinn,
mit denen, so das Leben haben, eins im Leben,
mit denen, so arm sind, eins in ihres Armut.
Bist du eins mit ihnen im Sinn,
so kommen dir die, so den Sinn haben,
auch freudig entgegen.
Bist du eins mit ihnen im Leben,
so kommen dir die, so das Leben haben,
auch freudig entgegen.
Bist du eins mit ihnen in ihrer Armut,
so kommen dir die, so da arm sind, auch freudig entgegen.
Wo aber der Glaube nicht stark genug ist,
da findet man keinen Glauben."
-  Translated by Richard Wilhelm, 1911, Chapter 23

 

 

"To speak rarely is natural.
That is why a gusty wind doesn't last the morning, a downpour of rain doesn't last the day.
Who does this?
Heaven and earth.
If heaven and earth cannot go on forever, how much less can human beings!
Therefore those who follow the Way assimilate to the Way; the virtuous assimilate to virtue, those who have lost assimilate to loss.
Those who assimilate to the Way are happy to gain it, those who assimilate to virtue too are happy to gain it,
     and those who assimilate to loss are also happy to gain it.
When trust is insufficient, there is distrust."
-  Translation by Thomas Cleary, 1991, Chapter 23

 

 

"Nature uses few words:
when the gale blows, it will not last long;
when it rains hard, it lasts but a little while;
What causes these to happen? Heaven and Earth.
Why do we humans go on endlessly about little
when nature does much in a little time?
If you open yourself to the Tao,
you and Tao become one.
If you open yourself to Virtue,
then you can become virtuous.
If you open yourself to loss,
then you will become lost.
If you open yourself to the Tao,
the Tao will eagerly welcome you.
If you open yourself to virtue,
virtue will become a part of you.
If you open yourself to loss,
the lost are glad to see you.
"When you do not trust people,
people will become untrustworthy.""
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 23 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"With few words affirm the Self.
A great wind does not blow all the morning,
A heavy wind does not continue all day.
Why is this so?
It is because of the inter-relations of Heaven and Earth.
If Heaven and Earth cannot make things last long.
How much less can man?
Therefore he who follows the service of Tao is one with Tao,
He who is virtuous is one with Teh,
He who fails is one with failure.
He who is one with Tao,
Tao shall also claim him.
He who is one with Teh
Teh shall also claim him.
He who is one with failure,
Failure shall also claim him.
Faith that is not complete is not faith."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 23

 

 

"Nature is sparing of words.
High winds do not last all morning.
A cloudburst doesn't last all day.
What makes them happen?
Heaven and earth.
If heaven and earth cannot contain their works
How can people sustain theirs?
Therefore if you follow Tao you become like Tao.
If you follow virtue you become like virtue.
If you forsake Tao you become forsaken.
Those who are like Tao are gladly welcomed by Tao.
Those who are like virtue are gladly welcomed by virtue.
Those who are forsaken are gladly welcomed by forsakenness.
Those who don't trust receive no trust."
-  Translated by Agnieszka Solska, 2008, Chapter 23

 

 

"To be sparing of words is natural.
A violent wind cannot last a whole morning; pelting rain cannot last a whole day.
Who have made these things but heaven and earth?
Inasmuch as heaven and earth cannot last forever, how can man?
He who engages himself in Tao is identified with Tao.
He who engages himself in virtue is identified with virtue.
He who engages himself in abandonment is identified with abandonment.
Identified by Tao, he will be well received by Tao.
Identified with virtue, he will be well received by virtue.
Identified with abandonment, he will be well received by abandonment."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 23 

 

 

"Celui qui ne parle pas arrive au non-agir.
Un vent rapide ne dure pas toute la matinée; une pluie violente ne dure pas tout le jour.
Qui est-ce qui produit ces deux choses?
Le ciel et la terre.
Si le ciel et la terre même ne peuvent subsister longtemps, à plus forte raison l'homme!
C'est pourquoi si l'homme se livre au Tao, il s'identifie au Tao;
s'il se livre à la vertu, il s'identifie à la vertu;
s'il se livre au crime, il s'identifie au crime."
-  Translated by Stanislas Julien, 1842, Chapter 23

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español

 

Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

"La Naturaleza dice pocas palabras:
El viento fuerte no dura mucho,
La lluvia torrencial no cae durante mucho tiempo.
Si las palabras de la Naturaleza no permanecen
¿Por qué habrían de hacerlo las del Hombre?

Para seguir el Tao, conviertete en Tao; el Tao te aceptará.
Para dar virtud, conviertete en virtud; la virtud te aceptará.
Si pierdes con el Tao, la pérdida te aceptará.
Has de confiar para que confíen en tí."
-  Translated by Antonio Rivas, 1998,
Capítulo 23   

 

 

"Hablar poco es lo natural.
Un huracán no dura toda la mañana.
Un aguacero no dura todo el día.
¿Quién hace estas cosas?
El cielo y la tierra.
Sí las cosas del cielo y la tierra
no pueden durar eternamente,
¿cómo pretende el hombre que sus cosas sí lo hagan?
Así, quien acepta al Tao
se une al Tao.
Quien acepta la virtud,
se une a la virtud.
Quien acepta la pérdida,
se une a esa pérdida.
Quien se identifica con una de estas cosas,
por ella es acogido y podrá avanzar plenamente.
Ábrete al Tao,
después confía en tus respuestas naturales
y todo encajará en su sitio."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013,
Capítulo 23 

 

 

"Hablar poco es conforme con la naturaleza.
Un torbellino no dura toda la mañana. 
Un chaparrón no dura todo el día.
¿Qué es lo que los produce?  El cielo y la tierra.
Si los fenómenos del cielo y del la tierra no son duraderos,
¿cómo lo pueden ser las acciones humanas?
El que va hacia el Tao es acogido por el Tao.
El que va hacia la Virtud es acogido por la Virtud.
El que va hacia la ruina es acogido por la ruina."
-  Translation by Alba, 1998,
Capítulo 23 

 

 

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This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Commentary, Notes, Related Information

 

Ziran    自然

"so of its own"; spontaneous, spontaneity

As an adjective, the term ziran means "spontaneous," "natural," "so of its own," "so of itself." As a noun, it denotes spontaneity, naturalness, the things as they are. It is a synonym of zizai (self-existent) and ziyou (self-produced), and is very close in meaning to zide (self-attaining) and ziwei (working by itself, doing spontaneously).

 

Ziran implies a free working; it is the positive side of the Dao, whose negative side is wu (no-thing). On the other hand, wu is the indeterminant and unknowable Dao, which is lost if it is given a name or an attribute: it is the Origin of life as it cannot be grasped and has no beginning. On the other hand, ziran is the Dao as producing life, its de(virtue), and is sometimes equated with the Original Pneuma (yuanqi). In this sense, ziran is like the water of a spring that never ceases to flow anew, and is a synonym of Origin (yuan) and Chaos (hundun). It is the permanence of the Dao and its de, the rule of Heaven and Earth that has no beginning and penetrates to the utmost of existence beyond the Void (Zongxuan xiansheng xuangang lun; CT 1052, 1a-b). Hence, ziran, as a quality ascribed to something, means "true" and "primal," and denotes transcendence.

 

On the cosmological level, ziran defines the way the world goes on by itself without anyone "doing" it, and expresses the faith in a world well-ordered and self-regulated in a natural way. Epistemologically, it means that we do not know what is producing life or how life is achieved. Ziran is then the ultimate word, not in the sense of an explication but as an expression of human ignorance and respect of the secret of life. As Daode jing 25 says, "The Dao models itself onziran," which means that it "models itself on what is so of its own," which is a tautology. Ziran can therefore also be an expression of agnosticism, as in Guo Xiang's commentary to the Zhuangzi. Under Buddhist influence, ziran also took on the meaning of "non-substantial," "fundamentally having no nature of its own," as opposed to what has cause and effect. In this sense, it is a synonym of "real emptiness" (zhenkong; see for instance Daojiao yishu, 8.4a, and Zhonghe ji, 3.14a).

 

In human beings, ziran means being free from dependence on some other thing or substance (wudai, as the Zhuangzisays), being natural (tian, the contrary of "made by man" or wei, which is the artificial in Zhuangzi's terms), and being creative. It means that each being has its own spring of life within itself. So to be ziran is to be natural in the highest sense, to nourish within oneself one's own nature that is one's own profound and true sprout of life.

 

To respect ziran one should not interfere (wuwei), and gently let life act and speak through oneself rather than acting and speaking individually. In that sense, ziran is the principle of handling affairs that guides the saint (shengren) or the sage king who respects the workings of the Dao in the world and in human affairs. To act spontaneously is to have no intention of one's own, to let the natural force that is within everything work freely. This is not the same as giving free rein to one's own fantasy (as the term has been misunderstood by some Xuanxue thinkers), because this fantasy is a only superficial desire to satisfy one's immediate wishes, and not the profound naturalness without desires that is ziran."
Encyclopedia of Taoism

 

 

 

Lao Tzu, Laozi

 

 

Next Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #24

Previous Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #22

Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 23

 

Tao Te Ching, Translations into English: Terebess Asia Online (TAO).  124 nicely formatted complete English language translations, on separate webpages, of the Daodejing.  Alphabetical index by translators.  Each webpage has all 81 chapters of the Tao Te Ching translated into English.  An outstanding collection─ the Best on the Internet. 


Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Concordance to the Daodejing


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 23 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6 


Tao Te Ching English Translations from Terebess Asia Online.  Over 30 translations. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 23, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  660 pages. 


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings from the Oral Tradition of Lao-Tzu.  By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching

Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2015. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo


This webpage was last modified or updated on August 2, 2015.  
 
This webpage was first distributed online on February 2, 2011. 

 

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This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

Michael P. Garofalo's E-mail

Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, California

Study Chi Kung or Tai Chi with Mike Garofalo

 

 

 


Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides

Cloud Hands Blog

Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation 

Bodymind Theory and Practices, Somaesthetics

The Five Senses

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons

Grandmaster Chang San Feng

Virtues

Qigong (Chi Kung) Health Practices

One Old Daoist Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81