Chapter 34

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

Chapter 33     Chapter 35     Index to All the Chapters     Taoism     Cloud Hands Blog

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Chapter 34

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 


English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Great (ta), Way or Universe or Nature or Reality (Tao), Tao is All Pervading, Expansive or Flooding or Overflowing (fan), Perfection of Trust, He or She or It (ch'i), Nourishing, Ten Thousand Things (wan wu), Left (tso), Right (yu), Returning to One's Root, Tao, Rely or Trust (shih), Modesty, Life or Born (shêng), Task of Achievement, Greatness, Reject or Refuse (tz'u), River, Merit or Success (kung), Returning, Finish or Complete (ch'êng), Creatures, Clothe (yi), Smallness, Nourish or Feed (yang), Humility, Productivity, Act or Make (wei), Root, Sage, Ruler or Lord (chu), Creative, Nameless (pu ming), Desires or Wants (yu), Small (hsiao), Source, Return or Revert (kuei), Origin, Last or End (chung), Love, Self or Personal (tzu), Eternal or Forever (ch'ang), Giving, Success or Accomplish (ch'êng), Hiding One's Virtues, Dao,  任成   

Términos en Español:  Tao es Omnipresente, Confianza, Modestia, Grandeza, Río, Devolución, Criaturas, Pequeñez, Humildad, Productividad, Raíz, Sabio, Izquierda, Derecha, Sin Nombre, Fuente, Origen, Amor, Dar, Virtudes, Camino, Naturaleza, Derramar, Expansivo, Izquierda, Derecha, Cosas, Confiar, Confianza, Vida, Rechazar, Negarse, Mérito, Éxito, Ella, Finalizar, Completa, sin Nombre, Vestir, Alimentar, Alimentación, Regla, Señor, Eterno, para Siempre, Deseos, Necesidades, Pequeño, Retorno, Fin, Ser, Éxito, Logre.

 


 

How great the Way, like a flooding river flowing left and right!
Holding nothing back, it gives to all in need and makes no claim upon them.
All creatures return to it, yet it rules none: how small it seems.
It rules none, yet all creatures return to it: how great it seems. 
By never seeking greatness, greatness comes."
-  Translated by Douglas Allchin, 2002, Chapter 34

 

 

"All-pervading is the Great Tao!
It may be found on the left hand and on the right.
All things depend on it for their production, which it gives to them, not one refusing obedience to it.
When its work is accomplished, it does not claim the name of having done it. 
It clothes all things as with a garment, and makes no assumption of being their lord.  
It may be named in the smallest things.
All things return to their root and disappear, and do not know that it is it which presides over their doing so.
It may be named in the greatest things.
Hence the sage is able to accomplish his great achievements.
It is through his not making himself great that he can accomplish them."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 34   

 

 

"The great way flows, such as it may left and right.
All things on earth depend on it for existence, and it never declines,
Meritorious accomplishments yet anonymous.
Clothes and supports all things on earth yet doesn't master.
Always without desire befits the name small.
All things on earth return here, Why?
Not being their master befits the name great.
Because of its ultimate non-self, it becomes great.
Hence it can accomplish its greatness."
-  Translated by Carl Abbott, 2012, Chapter 34 

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"How all-pervading is the great Reason!
It can be on the left and it can be on the right. 
The ten thousand things depend upon it for their life, and it refuses them not.
When its merit is accomplished it assumes not the name.
Lovingly it nourishes the ten thousand things and plays not the lord.
Ever desireless it can be classed with the small.   
The ten thousand things return home to it.
It plays not the lord.
It can be classed with the great.  
The holy man unto death does not make himself great and can thus accomplish his greatness."
-  Translated by Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki and Paul Carus, 1913, Chapter 34 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"The Great Tao is all-pervasive; it may be seen on the right and on the left.
All things depend upon it, and are produced; it denies itself to none. 
It achieves its works of merit, but has no name or reputation among men.
With tenderness it nourishes all things, yet claims no lordship over them. 
It is ever passionless, and may be named among the smallest things.
All things submit to it, yet it claims no lordship over them; it may be called great. 
Thus the Sage to the end of his life never exalts himself; and thus he is able to achieve great things."
-  Translated by Henry H. Balfour, Chapter 34

 

 

"Great Tao drifts─ it can go right or go left.
The thousands of things depend on it for life, it rejects nothing.
It achieves successes, but does not hold tight to the fame.
It clothes and feeds the thousands of things but does not act the ruler.
Always:
Desiring nothing, it can be called 'of no account.'
The thousands of things turn back to it but it does not act the ruler─ it can be called 'Great.'
Because in the end
it does not insist on its own greatness,
yes, it is able to achieve its full greatness."
-  Translated by Michael LaFargue, 1994, Chapter 34 

  

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

 

                             

 

 

 

"The great Tao is everywhere, on all sides.
Everything derives from it;
nothing is rejected by it.
Through Tao everything exists
yet it does not take possession.
It provides for everything
yet it does not lay claim.
Without motive it seems small.
Being the source of everything it is great.
Because it never claims greatness,
its greatness shines brightly."
-  Translated by C. Ganson, Chapter 34 

 

 

大道汎兮其可左右. 
萬物恃之而生而不辭. 
功成不名有. 
衣養萬物而不為主.
常無欲, 可名於小.  
萬物歸焉而不為主, 可名為大. 
以其終不自為大.
故能成其大. 
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 34

 

 

ta tao fan hsi ch'i k'o tso yu.
wan wu shih chih erh shêng erh pu tz'u.
kung ch'êng pu ming yu.
yi yang wan wu erh pu wei chu.
ch'ang wu yü, k'o ming yü hsiao.
wan wu kuei yen erh pu wei chu, k'o ming wei ta.
yi ch'i chung pu tzu wei ta.
ku nêng ch'êng ch'i ta.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 34
 


Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 34 of the Tao Te Ching

 


da dao fan xi qi ke zuo you.
wan wu shi zhi yi sheng er bu ci. 
gong cheng bu ming you.
yi yang wan wu er bu wei zhu. 
chang wu yu, ke ming yu xiao.
wan wu gui yan er bu wei zhu, ke ming wei da.
yi qi zhong bu zi wei da. 
gu neng cheng qi da.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 34

 
 
 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin and Wade Giles Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"The Tao is like an overflowing river.
It rises to the left and to the right.
The ten thousand things arise from it, but do not depart from it.
The Tao acts, but cannot be defined.
It clothes and nourishes all beings, but does not rule over them.
It endures without desire and without seeming "big."
The ten thousand things find their home in it, and yet it does not exercise lordship over them.
The Tao is very great, but it does not show its greatness.
Therefore, it is truly great."
-  Translated by George Cronk, 1999, Chapter 34 

 

 
 
Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"Tao contains the whole Universe.
All things come out of Tao.
It doesn't reject anybody or anything.
He who is on the Tao Way is a creator,
But doesn't take possession of the creation.
He is generous, but doesn't look for gratitude of people.
Without own desires, he isn't easily noticed.
He does good things without taking merits.
Not displaying his greatness, the Wise Person is great indeed."
-  Translated by Octavian Sarbatorare, 2002, Chapter 34 

 

 

"Great Tao is like a boat that drifts;
It can go this way; it can go that.
The ten thousand creatures owe their existence to it and it does not disown them;
Yet having produced them, it does not take possession of them.
Makes no claim to be master over them,
(And asks for nothing from them.)
Therefore it may be called the Lowly.
The ten thousand creatures obey it,
Though they know not that they have a master;
Therefore it is called the Great.
So too the Sage just because he never at any time makes a show of greatness
In fact achieves greatness."
-  Translated by Arthur Waley, 1934, Chapter 34 

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"The Great Tao (the Laws of the Universe) is universal like a flood.
How can it be turned to the right or to the left?
All creatures depend on it, and it denies nothing to anyone.
It does its work,
But it makes no claims for itself.
It clothes and feeds all,
But it does not rule them
Thus, it may be called "the Little."
All things return to it as to their home,
But it does not rule them 
It may be called "the Great."
It is just because it does not wish to be great
That its greatness is fully realized.
The Complete Thinker would not control the world;
They are in harmony with the world."
-  Translated by John Louis Albert Trottier, 1994, Chapter 34  

 

 

"The great Tao pervades everywhere, both on the left and on the right.
By it all things came in to being, and it does not reject them.
Merits accomplished, it does not possess them.
It loves and nourishes all things but does not dominate over them.
It is always non-existent; therefore it can be named as small.
All things return home to it, and it does not claim mastery over them;
therefore it can be named as great.
Because it never assumes greatness, therefore it can accomplish greatness."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 34

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"The Tao drifts it can go left or right
everything lives by its grace but it doesn't speak when its work succeeds it makes no claim it has no desires
shall we call it small
everything turns to it but it wields no control shall we call it great
therefore the sage never acts great thus he can do great things"
-  Translated by Red Pine, Chapter 34  

 

 

The Tao is immanent; it extendeth to the right hand as to the left.
All things derive from it their being; it createth them, and all comply
with it.
Its work is done, and it proclaimeth it not.
It is the ornament of all things, yet it claimeth not fief of them; there is
nothing so small that it inhabiteth not, and informeth it.
All things return without knowledge of the Cause thereof; there is
nothing so great that it inhabiteth not, and informeth it.
In this manner also may the Sage perform his Works.
It is by not thrusting himself forward that he winneth to his success."
-  Translated by Aleister Crowley, 1918, Chapter 34

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

 

                                     

 

 

 

"Great Tao flows everywhere,
It extends to the left and to the right.
All beings receive It in order to live and be free.
It works out perfectness in them although It possesses not a Name.
It protects them with love and sustains them, but does not claim to be Ruler of their actions.
Always seeking the innermost, you may say that Its Name is in the Small.
All beings return again into It, yet It does not claim to be Ruler of their actions.
You may say that Its Name is in the Great.
That is why, to the end of his life, the self-controlled man is not great in action,
Thus he is able to perfect his greatness."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 34

 

 

"The great Tao flows unobstructed in every direction.
All things rely on it to conceive and be born,
and it does not deny even the smallest of creation.
When it has accomplished great wonders,
it does not claim them for itself.
It nourishes infinite worlds,
yet it doesn't seek to master the smallest creature.
Since it is without wants and desires,
it can be considered humble.
All of creation seeks it for refuge
yet it does not seek to master or control.
Because it does not seek greatness;
it is able to accomplish truly great things."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 34 

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   By Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"Great Tao is all-pervading,

At once on left and right

It may be found, and all things wait

On it for life and light.

 

No one is refused the gift,

And when the work is done

It does not take the name of it,

Nor claim the merit won.

 

All things it loves and nurses,

But does not strive to own,

Has no desires, and can be named

With the tiniest ever known.

 

All things return home to it,

But it does not strive to own,

And can be named with the mightiest,

For it is the Tao alone.

 

And thus the sage is able

To accomplish his great deeds,

To the end he claims no greatness,

And his great work thus succeeds."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 34

 

 

 

 

 

"The great Tao flows everywhere
It fills everything to the left and to the right
All things owe their existence to it and it cannot deny any one of them
Tao is eternal
It does not favour one over the other
It brings all things to completion without their even knowing it
Tao nourishes and protects all creatures yet does not claim lordship over them
So we class it with the most humble
Tao is the home to which all things return yet it wants nothing in return
So we call it he Greatest
The Sage is the same way ?
He does not claim greatness over anything
He not eve aware of his own greatness
Tell me, what could be greater than this?"
-  Translated by Jonathan Star, 2001, Chapter 34 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"The great Tao is the cycle of life!
It can move to the left and to the right.
Ten-thousand things rely upon it and it gives birth and does not refuse.
It deserves praise for the whole which cannot be named.
It clothes and nourishes ten-thousand things and does not act like a ruler.
It is always without deep seated desires.
Its name is associated with everything including the small.
Ten-thousand things revert to their original state, and from that place do not act as rulers.
The Name becomes great because until the end, it is not great and does not act great.
Thus it can succeed in its greatness."
-  Translated by Alan Sheets and Barbara Tovey, Chapter 34 

 

 

"How all-pervading the superior Dao is!
It could be on the left, it could be on the right.
Upon it the life of all things depends and it does not deny anyone.
It accomplishes merits but it does not possess fame.
It shields and nourishes All Things but it does not lord over them.
It may be called the Superior.
Hence, a Sage ruler never wishes to be superior.
Therefore he eventually became superior."
-  Translated by Tang Zi-Chang, Chapter 34 

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

"El gran, Tao fluye por todos partes, hacia la izquierda y hacia la derecha.
Todas las cosas existen por mediación suya, ye él no las rechaza.
Al dar es espléndido, no exige retribucción. 
Ama y nutre todas las cosas, pero no domina sobre ellas.
Es siempre no-existente, por lo que puede ser llamado pequeño.
Todas las cosas regresan a él, pero él no las reclama como su dueño; por esto puede ser llamado grande.
Porque nunca asume su grandeza, la grandeza está con él."
-  Translated from Chinese into English by Ch'u Ta-Kao, Translated from English into Spanish by Caridad Diaz Faes

 

"El Gran Tao es como un río que fluye en todas las direcciones.
Los diez mil seres y las diez mil cosas le deben la existencia
y él a ninguno se la niega.
El Tao cumple su propósito sin apropiarse de nada.
Cuida y alimenta a los diez mil seres
sin adueñarse de ellos.
Carece de ambiciones,
por eso puede ser llamado pequeño.
Los diez mil seres retornan a él sin que los reclame,
y por eso puede ser llamado grande.
De la misma forma, el sabio nunca se considera grande,
y así, perpetúa su grandeza."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Capitulo 34

 

 

"El Tao Eterno penetra todo. 
Está presente a la izquierda y al la derecha.
Y gracias a Tao, todas las almas aparecen, siguen viviendo y siguen desarrolándose.
Aungue Tao es tan grandioso y realiza actos tan grandes, no desea la gloria para para Sí.
Tao educa con amor a todos los seres, no ejerce violencia sobre ellos
     y no insiste en que las personas cumplan Sus deseos.
Tao es Grande, aunque no insiste en esto.
Las personas razonables anhelan alcanzar a Tao, al Grande."
-  Translated by Anton Teplyy, 2008, Capitulo 34

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 34

 


Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español


Concordance to the Daodejing


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 34 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi.  Seven Star Communications, 2006, 240 pages. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept


Tao Te Ching English Translations from Terebess Asia Online.  Over 30 translations. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 34, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2015. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

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This webpage was last modified or updated on December 12, 2014. 
This webpage was first distributed online on April 4, 2011. 
 

 

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Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, California

 

 


Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides

Cloud Hands Blog

Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

One Old Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81