Chapter 77

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

Chapter 76     Chapter 78     Index to All the Chapters     Taoism     Cloud Hands Blog

English     Chinese     Spanish

 

 

 

Chapter 77

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  The Way (tao) of Heaven (t'ien), Excess or Surplus (yu yü), Deficient (pu tsu), cies, Bow (kung), Archery, Heaven's Reason, Releasing, Impartiality, Sage or Holy Man (shêng jên), Lower or Bring Down (yi), Show or Display or See (chien), Supplement Deficiency, Have or Possess (yu), Loose or Loss (sun), Acting Sage, Non-Attachment to Deeds, Below or Underneath (hsia), Supplement or Add On or Increase (pu), Worth or Virtue or Goodness (hsien), Bend or Flex (chang), Decrease or Diminish (sun), Imbalance, Self-Control, Raise or Lift Up (chü), Gives or Offers (fêng), Don't Brag, Balancing, Person or Man (jên), Archery, Expect or Claim (shih), Letting Go, Top or Higher (kao), Humility, Enough or Sufficient (tsu), Can or Able To (nêng), Stop or Stay (ch'u), Works or Accomplishes (wei),  天道
Términos en Español:  El Camino del Cielo, Exceso, Superávit, Deficiente, Arco, Razón, Liberar, Imprarcialidad, Sabio, Bajo,
Suplemento Deficiencia, Tener, Poseer, Suelto, Pérdida, Debajo, Suplemento, Añadir, Aumento, Virtud, Bondad, Curva, Amenizar,  Desequilibrio, Autocontrol, Levante, Ofrece, No Presumir, Equilibrio, Persona, Tiro con Arco, Esperar, Reclamación, Seguir Adelante, Superior, Humildad, Suficiente, Capaz, Alto, Permanecer, Obras, Trabajo. 

 

 

"The way of heaven,
Is it not like stretching a bow?
What is high up is pressed down,
What is low down is lifted up;
What has surplus is reduced,
What is deficient is supplemented.
The way of heaven,
It reduces those who have surpluses,
To supplement those who are deficient.
The human way is just not so.
It reduces those who are deficient,
To offer those who have surpluses.
Who can offer his surpluses to the world?
Only a person of Tao.
Therefore the sage works (wei) without holding on to,
Accomplishes without claiming credit.
Is it not because he does not want to show off his merits?"
-  Translated by Ellen M. Chen, Chapter 77  

 

 

"The Tao of Heaven resembles a drawn bow.
It brings down the high and exalts the lowly; it takes from those who have superfluity, and gives to those who have not enough. The Tao of Heaven abstracts where there is too much, and supplements where there is deficiency.
The Tao of men does not so.
It takes away from what is already deficient in order to bestow on those who have a superfluity.
Who is able to devote his surplus to the needs of others?
Only he who is possessed of Tao. 
Thus it is that the Sage acts, yet does not plume himself; achieves works of merit, yet does not hold to them.
He has no wish to make a display of his worthiness."
-  Translated by Frederic H. Balfour, 1884, Chapter 77 

 

 

"Heaven's Way is like the stringing of a bow: It pulls down what is high it lifts up what is low it takes away from what has an abundance to give to what has not enough.
Heaven's Way: Take away from what has an abundance help along what has not enough.
People's way is not like this: Take away from what has not enough to offer it to what has an abundance.
Who can have an abundance to offer the world?
Only the one who has Tao.
And so the Wise Person: Works but does not rely on this achieves successes but does not dwell in them has no desire to show off his worth."
-  Translated by Michael LaFargue, 1992, Chapter 77 

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"Is not God's Way much like a bow well bent?
The upper part has been disturbed, pressed down;
The lower part is raised up from its place;
The slack is taken up; the slender width
Is broader drawn; for thus the Way of God
Cuts people down when they have had too much,
And fills the bowls of those who are in want.
But not the way of man will work like this:
The people who have not enough are spoiled
For tribute to the rich and surfeited.

Who can benefit the world
From stored abundance of his own?
He alone who has the Way,
The Wise Man who can act apart
And not depend on others' whims;
But not because of his high rank
Will he succeed; he does not wish
To flaunt superiority."
-  Translated by Raymond B. Blakney, 1955, Chapter 77 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"Bend the bow and embrace the tiger
to emulate the way of heave

drawn with resoluteness
the bow changes length and width
turning in on itself

released with resoluteness
the bow projects its arrow fixedly to a target
by equalizing itself

the bow can shoot up or down as needed
always seeking to balance out
flexibility and cohesion
always seeking to resolve
excesses of energy and deficiencies of energy

equalizing and balancing out and resolving
are the ways of heaven

but the ways of man
make things unequal
imbalanced and unresolved
cutting man off from heaven and earth

only a sage wise man humbly cultivating the tao
     way of life
can entreat heaven on man's behalf
asking heaven
to reestablish the natural order
by not asking heaven

when he is successful
he does not dwell on it
displaying his skill at emulating the way of heaven

he simply smiles
and moves on to the next task."
-  Translated by John Bright-Fey, Chapter 77

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"Nature's way is like bending a great bow:
The top comes down, and the bottom comes up.
Length is shortened, and width is expanded.
Nature's way is to take from the too-much, and give to the not-enough.
Man's way is usually the opposite.
Who has enough to offer the world?"
-  Translated by Ned Lund, Chapter 77  

 

 

天之道, 其猶張弓與.
高者抑之.
下者舉之.
有餘者損之.
不足者補之.
天之道損有餘而補不足.
人之道則不然.
損不足以奉有餘.
孰能有餘以奉天下.
唯有道者.
是以聖人為而不恃. 
功成而不處.
其不欲見賢.
-  Chinese characters, Chapter 77, Tao Te Ching

 

 

t'ien chih tao, ch'i yu chang kung yü.
kao chê yi chih.
hsia chê chü chih.
yu yü chê sun chih.
pu tsu chê pu chih.
t'ien tao sun yu yü erh pu pu tsu.
jên chih tao tsê pu jan. 
sun pu tsu yi fêng yu yü.
shu nêng yu yü yi fêng t'ien hsia. 
wei yu tao chê. 
shih yi shêng jên wei erh pu shih.
kung ch'êng erh pu ch'u.
ch'i pu yü chien hsien. 
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Chapter 77, Tao Te Ching   

 


 

Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 77 of the Tao Te Ching

 

tian zhi dao, qi you zhang gong yu.
gao zhe yi zhi.
xia zhe ju zhi.
you yu zhe sun zhi.
bu zu zhe bu zhi.
tian zhi dao sun you yu er bu bu zu.
ren zhi dao ze bu ran.
sun bu zu yi feng you yu.
shu neng you yu yi feng tian xia.
wei you dao zhe.
shi yi sheng ren wei er bu shi.
gong cheng er bu chu.
qi bu yu xian xian.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Chapter 77, Daodejing 

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization (romanization), English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin and Wade Giles Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"The Way of Heaven is like the drawing of a bow.
What is high is brought lower, and what is low is brought higher.
What is too long is shortened;
What is too short is lengthened.

The Way of Heaven is to take away from what is excessive
And to replenish what is deficient.
But the Way of Man is different:
It takes away from those who have little,
And gives to those who already have plenty.
Who is able to offer the world whatever he has in excess?
Only the man of Tao.

Therefore the Sage works without claiming reward,
Accomplishes without taking credit.
He has no desire to display his excellence."
-  Translated by Keith H. Seddon, Chapter 77 

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  
Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Be Enlightened! A Guidebook to the Tao Te Ching and Taoist Meditation: Your Six-Month Journey to Spiritual Enlightenment   By Wes Burgess
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

 

                             

 

 

 

"The Way of Heaven is like the bending of a bow.
The upper is lowered, while the lower is raised.
The too long is shortened, while the too short is lengthened.
The Way of Heaven is the way of balance:
Take from that which has more
and give to that which has less.
The way of man is different:
Take from those who have less
and give to those who have more.
Who is so abundant that he can continue to give to the world?
Only the man who embodies the Tao and is thus inexhaustible.
Therefore, the sage, being the fulcrum of the world,
Benefits his people without proclaiming it,
Accomplishes his task without dwelling on it,
Enlightens his world without flaunting his wisdom."
-  Translated by Yasuhiko Genku Kimura, Chapter 77  

 

 

"Is not the Tao of heaven like the drawing of a bow?
It brings down the part which is high; it raises the part which is low; it lessens the part which is redundant (convex); it fills up the part which is insufficient (concave).
The Tao of heaven is to lessen the redundant and fill up the insufficient.
The Tao of man, on the contrary, is to take from the insufficient and give to the redundant.
Who can take from the redundant and give to the insufficient?
Only he who has Tao can.
Therefore the Sage does not horde.
The more he helps others, the more he benefits himself the more he gives to others, the more he gets himself.
The Tao of heaven does one good but never does one harm; the Tao of the Sage acts but never contends."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 77 

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

 

                                     

 

 

 

"The Way of Heaven—its similarity to stretching a bow?
That which is high—[it] pulls it down.
That which is low—[it] lifts it up.
That which has excess—[it] reduces it.
That which is lacking—[it] adds to it.
The Way of Heaven
Takes away [where] there is excess
And adds to [where there is] lack.
The way of people
Necessarily different
Takes away [where there is] lack
In order to offer to [that which] has excess.
Who can have surplus by means of offering [it] to the world?
Only those who have the Tao.
Therefore, the sages
Act but do not presume
Achieve goals but do not dwell [on them].
They do not desire to be seen as praiseworthy or despicable."
-  Translated by Aalar Fex, Chapter 77 

 

 

"Heaven’s Way, like unto a bow full-drawn –
Low end raised, top bent down –
Subtracts from the have-mores
And supplies those in want.
Heaven’s Way – to supply who wants
By taking from the have-mores –
Is not the Way of men,
Who take from those in need
To serve those who have more.
Who will use the surplus to serve this world below?
None but men of the Way.
Wise rulers for this reason
Act without self-satisfaction,
For their deeds shun recognition
To conceal their contribution."
-  Translated by Moss Roberts, 2001, Chapter 77 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"Heaven's Way is indeed like the bending of a bow.
When (the string) is high, bring it down.
When it is low, raise it up.
When it is excessive, reduce it.
When it is insufficient, supplement it.
The Way of Heaven reduces whatever is excessive and supplements whatever in insufficient.
The way of man is different.
It reduces the insufficient to offer to the excessive.
Who is able to have excess to offer to the world?
Only the man of Tao.
Therefore the sage acts, but does not rely on his own ability.
He accomplishes his task, but does not claim credit for it.
He has no desire to display his excellence." 
-  Translated by Wing-Tsit Chan, 1963, Chapter 77  

 

 

"How the Way is like stringing a bow!
The upper end is brought down.
The lower end is lifted.
All excess is reduced.
All deficit is restored.
With all parts in balance, it is fit for use.
In nature, any surplus flows
to those without from those with more.
Men instead reverse the flow
from those without to those with more.
Only one with integrity has abundance
and shares it with the world.
The person of integrity
works, expecting no return,
completes his task, not dwelling on it,
and rests, content unto himself."
-  Translated by Douglas Allchin, 2002, Chapter 77 

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"Heavenly Tao is like the bending of a bow.
That which is high is bent downwards,
That which is low is raised up,
That which is too much is lessened,
That which is not enough is increased.
Heavenly Tao takes from those who have too much,
And gives to those who have not enough.
The way of man is not thus,
He takes from those who have not enough,
And gives to those who already have too much.
Who is able to hold his wealth in order to give it to men?
Only he who has the Tao.
That is why the self-controlled man acts without looking for reward,
he brings to perfectness without claiming credit, he desires not to let his wisdom appear."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 77

 

 

"The Tao of Heaven works in the world
like the drawing of a bow.
The top is bent downward;
the bottom is bent up.
The excess is taken from,
and the deficient is given to.

The Tao works to use the excess,
and gives to that which is depleted.
The way of people is to take from the depleted,
and give to those who already have an excess.

Who is able to give to the needy from their excess?
Only someone who is following the way of the Tao.

This is why the Master gives
expecting nothing in return.
She does not dwell on her past accomplishments,
and does not glory in any praise."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 77

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   Translated by Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"Like the bending of an archer's bow is the Tao of Heaven!
It brings down that which is high, and raises up that which is depressed.
It takes away where there is excess, and gives where there is deficiency.
The Tao of Heaven makes all things equal.
This Tao is not of man.
Man takes from the needy to add to his own excess.
Who is he that, having a superabundance, can bring it to the service of the world?
Only he who has the Tao.
This is why the wise man acts without expectation of reward, and completes his task without claiming merit.
For thus he hides his wealth."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 77

 

 

"May not the Way of Heaven be compared to the method of bending a bow?
The part of the bow which was high is brought low, and what was low is raised up.
So Heaven diminishes where there is superabundance, and supplements where there is deficiency.
It is the Way of Heaven to diminish superabundance, and to supplement deficiency.
It is not so with the way of man.
He takes away from those who have not enough to add to his own superabundance.
Who can take his own superabundance and therewith serve all under heaven?
Only he who is in possession of the Tao!
Therefore the ruling sage acts without claiming the results as his.
He achieves his merit and does not rest arrogantly in it.
He does not wish to display his superiority."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 77 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"May not the Way of Heaven be compared

To the bending of a bow,

Bringing down the part which formerly was high,

And raising up the low?

It takes from men their superabundant things,

Which to the poorer go.

 

But while it is the Way of Heaven to curb

All superfluity,

And supplement, for those who lacking are,

Their own deficiency,

Men's way is different quite, they rob the poor,

That richer they may be.

 

Who are the men who, with great store of wealth,

Their fellow-men can bless

By serving them?  Tis only who, themselves,

The Tao of Heaven possess.

 

Therefore the sage will act, but never claim

Himself the benefits,

Accomplish deeds of merit, then retire

Unseen from where he sits;

And does he ever seek to make display

Of worth he never admits?"
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 77 

 

 

"The Tao of Heaven,
Is it not like the bending of a bow?
The top comes down and the bottom-end goes up,
The extra length is shortened, the insufficient width is expanded.
It is the way of Heaven to take away from those that have too much
And give to those that have not enough.
Not so with man's way:
He takes from those that have not
And gives it as tribute to those that have too much.
Who can have enough and to spare to give to the entire world?
Only the man of Tao.
Therefore the Sage acts, but does not possess,
Accomplishes but lays claim to no credit,
Because he has no wish to seem superior."
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1955, Chapter 77 

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

 

"El Tao del cielo
semeja al que tensa el arco.
Hace rebajar lo alto y hace levantar lo bajo.
Si la cuerda es demasiado larga se la acorta.
Si no hay suficiente cuerda, se la alarga.
El Tao del cielo
es quitar al que le sobra
y dar al que le falta.
La ley del hombre,
sin embargo, es muy distinta:
quita al que le falta
y añade al que le sobra.
¿Qué hombre que tiene de sobra
le daría sus riquezas al mundo?
Sólo el hombre que posee al Tao.
Por eso, el sabio
hace su trabajo sin acumular nada por él,
realiza su obra sin apropiarse de ella,
y no se vanagloria de su sabiduría."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Capitulo 77

 

 

"El camino del cielo
semeja a quien tensa el arco.
Humilla lo alto y alza lo bajo.
Rebaja lo que sobra y completa lo que falta.

El camino del cielo
es quitar al que le sobra
y dar al que le falta.
El camino del hombre,
sin embargo, es muy distinto:
quita al que le falta
y añade al que le sobra.

¿Quién ofrece al mundo todo lo que le sobra?
Sólo quien tiene el Tao.

El sabio hace y no retiene,
nada exige por su obra
y oculta su sabiduría."
-  Spanish Version Online at RatMachines, Capitulo 77 

 

 

 

 

Lao Tzu, Lao Zi

 

 

Next Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #78

Previous Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #76

Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 77

 

Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin romanization (Romanization) of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization (romanization), English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español


Concordance to the Daodejing


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles romanization (Romanization), and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 77 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6 


Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse  The largest collection of very nicely formatted complete versions of the Tao Te Ching.  The collection includes 209 complete versions in 27 languages, plus 28 Chinese versions.  There are 112 English language versions of the Tao Te Ching available at this website.  A variety of search methods and comparison methods are provided, as well a a detailed index.  Offline as of 25 May 2013. 


Tao Te Ching English Translations from Terebess Asia Online.  Over 30 translations. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 77, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2014. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.


This webpage was last modified or updated on January 21, 2014. 
This webpage was first distributed online on March 10, 2011. 
 

 

Michael P. Garofalo's E-mail

Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, California

Study Chi Kung or Tai Chi with Mike Garofalo

 

 


Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides

Cloud Hands Blog

Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

One Old Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

Vacation and Learn in Beautiful Red Bluff, California

Beginning T'ai Chi Ch'uan Options:  Yang 24, Chen 18, Sun 24, Cane 18

Beginning Chi Kung (Qigong) Options: Five Animal Frolics, Eight Brocades , Daoist Temple, Magic Pearl, Yoga

Valley Spirit Center


Lectures, Private Lessons, Classes, Consulting, Workshops, Questions and Answers

Reasonable Hourly Rates

Instructor:  Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

Excellent Recreational Opportunities for Persons of All Ages in the North Sacramento Valley
The Perfect Weekend Getaway for You, Friends and Family
Beautiful Scenery, Pleasant Weather, and Clear Skies for the Outdoor Enthusiast
Activities: Sight Seeing, Bicycling, Walking, Shopping, Spas, Photography, Reading, Relaxing, Internal Arts Studies
The Valley Spirit Center includes extensive gardens for Tai Chi practice and a Sacred Circle Garden
A Full Array of Services and Excellent and Reasonably Priced Accommodations in Redding or Red Bluff

Contact Mike: Email or Phone 530-200-3546

My Daily Tai Chi Chuan and Chi Kung Training Program

 

 

                          

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

 

 

Pulling Onions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photographs around the Valley Spirit Center near the City of Red Bluff

in the North Sacramento Valley Area, California

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

Return to the Top of this Webpage

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81