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Red Bluff, California
 

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Zhuangzi, Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang
Bibliography, Links, Resources

 

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang, Kwang-dze)  369—286 BCE

 

Biography: Zhuangzi

 

The Butterfly as Companion: Meditations on the First Three Chapters of the Chuang Tzu.  Translation and commentary by Professor Kuang-Ming Wu.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  SUNY Series in Religion and Philosophy.  New York, State University at New York, 1990.  512 pages.  ISBN: 978-0887066863. 


Chuang Tsu: Inner Chapters.
  Translation by Gia-fu Feng and Jane English.  New York, Vinatage Books, Random House, 1974.  Amber Lotus, 2000.  161 pages.  Includes black and white photographs, and text in Chinese and English.  ISBN: 0394719905.  VSCL. 


Chuang Tsu (Zhuang Zi)  Translated by Burton Watson. 


Chuang Tzu.  Translated by James Legge, 1891.  Chapters 1-14.  Chinese Text Project: English translation and Chinese characters. 


Chuang Tzu.  Translated by James Legge, 1891.  Chapters 1-33.  Brief notes.  Prepared by Tormod Kinnes, 2001. 


Chuang Tzu.  Translated by James Legge, 1891.  Chapters 1-33.  Complied by Stephen McIntyre. 


Chuang Tzu.  Translated by James Legge, 1891.  Chapter 1-33.  Extensive footnotes for each Chapter.  Prepared by RatMachines - Philosophy. 


Chuang Tzu.  Translated by James Legge, 1891.  Chapter 1-33.  Sacred Text Archive.  This version includes an introduction for each Chapter and detailed footnotes. 


Chuang Tzu.  Translated by James Legge, 1891.  Chapter 6.  Includes selected translations of specific passages in Chapter 6 from other translators besides James Legge.  Prepared by Mike Garofalo, 2013. 


Chuang Tsu (Zhuang Zi)  Translated by Lin Yutang. 


Chuang Tzu.  Translated by Tao Study Group and Derek Lin.


The Chuang-tzu or Zhuang-zi, The World Wide Web Virtual Library

 

 

 

Chuang Tsu: Inner Chapters.   Translation by Gia-fu Feng and Jane English

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries.   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi).   Translated by A. C. Graham

Wandering on the Way: Early Taoist Tales and Parables of Chuang Tzu Translation and commentary Victor H. Mair

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu).   By Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices.  By Mike Garofalo

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons.   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao.   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

 

                                   

 

 

 

Chuang Tzu  


Chuang Tzu, Zhuangzi, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang, Master Zhuang, Chuang Chou, Chuang Tse, Chuang Tsu, Tchuang Tzu, etc..  Pronounced jwawng dz or Jwahng dzuh per Victor Mair.  Master Chuang lived from 369-286 BCE, and died at the age of 83 years of age. 


Chuang-Tzu or Zhuang-Zi: Information Page 


Chuang Tsu (Zhuangzi): Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes


Chuang Tzu: Basic Writings.  Translation by Burton Watson.  New York, Columbia University Press, 1964, 1996.  Index, notes, bibliography, 160 pages.  ISBN: 978-0231105958.   I like the larger font size, ample line spacing, and black print of this book for easier reading.  VSCL. 


Chuang-Tzu for Spiritual Transformation: An Analysis of the Inner Chapters.   By Robert E. Allinson.  S.U.N.Y. Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  New York, State University of New York Press, 1989.  Index, notes, 203 pages.  ISBN: 
978-0887069697.  VSCL. 


Chuang Tzu: The Inner Chapters
Translated by David Hinton.  Counterpoint, 1998.  144 pages.  ISBN: 1887178791. 


Chuang-Tzu: The Inner Chapters   Translated with commentary by Angus C. Graham (1919-1991).   Indianapolis, Hackett Pub. Co., 1981, 2001 edition.  Index, extensive footnotes, 293 pages.  ISBN: 0872205819.  VSCL. 


Chuang Tzu, The Inner Chapters: The Classic Taoist Text  By Solala Towler.  A New Translation of the Chuang Tzu with Commentary.  Extensive black and white photographs.  London, Watkins Publishing, 2010.  170 pages.  ISBN:  9781906787998.  VSCL. 


Chuang-tzu: The Tao of Perfect Happiness.  By Livia Kohn.  Selections annotated and explained.  Woodstock, Vermont, Skylight Paths Pub., 2011.  Reading lists, 210 pages.  ISBN: 978-1594732966.  VSCL. 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

Dao De Jing (Tao Te Ching) by Lao Tzu (Laozi):  Selected translations by Chapters, Index of Translators, Themes


Daoist Studies and Practices


Daoism, Daoists: Bibliography, Links, Quotations, Notes 


Hiding the World in the World: Uneven Discourses on the Zhuangzi.  Edited by Scott Cook.  S.U.N.Y. Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  New York, State University of New York Press, 2003.  328 pages.  ISBN:  978-0791458662. 


Hunger Mountain: A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape  By David Hinton. 


The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham.  Hackett Publishing Co., 2001.  304 pages.  ISBN: 978-0872205819.  VSCL. 


Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi):  Selected translations by Chapters, Index of Translators, Themes.  Prepared by Mike Garofalo. 


Liberation As Affirmation: The Religiosity of Zhuangzi and Nietzsche.  By Ge Ling Shang.  New York, State University of New York, 2006.  54 pages.  SUNY Series on Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  ISBN: 978-0791466681.  VSCL.  


Quotations from Master Chuang


Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

 

 

Chuang-Tzu for Spiritual Transformation: An Analysis of the Inner Chapters.   By Robert E. Allinson

Chuang-tzu: The Tao of Perfect Happiness. By Livia Kohn

The Butterfly as Companion: Meditations on the First Three Chapters of the Chuang Tzu.  By Kuang-Ming Wu 

 

                       

 

 

 

Taoism: Growth of a Religion  By Isabelle Robinet.  Translated by Phyllis Brooks.  Stanford University Press, 1997.  320 pages.  ISBN: 978-0804728393.  VSCL. 


Taoism: The Virtual Library 


Taoism, Taoists: Bibliography, Links, Quotations, Notes 


Taoist Studies and Practices 


Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi):  Selected translations by Chapters, Index of Translators, Themes


VSCL = Valley Spirit Center Library, Red Bluff, California 


Wandering at Ease in the Zhuangzi.  Edited by Roger T. Ames.  S.U.N.Y. Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  New York, State University of New York Press, 1998.  250 pages.  ISBN:  978-0791439227.   


Wandering on the Way: Early Taoist Tales and Parables of Chuang Tzu
Translated with an introduction and commentary by Victor H. Mair.  New York, Bantam Books, 1994.  Glossary, bibliography, 402 pages.   ISBN: 0553374060.   VSCL.   


The Way of Chuang Tzu (Second Edition) 
Translation and commentary by Thomas Merton.  New Directions, Second Edition, 2010.  160 pages.  ISBN: 0811218511. 


Zhuangzi: Basic Writings  Translated by Burton Watson.  New York, Columbia University Press, 1st Edition, 2003.  Index, 164 pages.  ISBN: 978-0231129596.  VSCL. 


Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature  An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai.  Translated into English by Brian Bruya.  Afterword by Donald J. Munro.  Princeton University Press, 1st Edition, 1992.  160 pages.  ISBN: 978-0691008820.  VSCL. 


Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries.  Translated with an introduction and notes by Brook Ziporyn.  Indianapolis, Hackett Pub. Co., 2009.  Notes, index, bibliography, 238 pages.  ISBN: 9780872209114.  VSCL. 


Zhuangzi, The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.  A commentary on the first 6 Chapters. 


Zhuangzi.  Translated with and introduction by Hyun Hochsmann and Yang Guorong.  New York, Pearson Longman, 2007.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 342 pages.  Longman Library of Primary Sources in Philosophy.  ISBN: 0321273567.  VSCL. 


Zhuangzi - Wikiquote 

 

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Chuang Tsu, Zhuang Zi, Master Chuang 
Quotations from Zhuangzi

 

Source of Quotations:  [Z 2] =  Zhuangzi, Chapter 2 

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang, Kwang-dze)  369—286 BCE

 

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu)
Inner Chapters

 

Chapter 1

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Chapter 4

Chapter 5

Chapter 6

The Great Source as Teacher, The Great Ancestral Teacher, The Great and Honored Teacher

 

 

 

Chapter 6, Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu), Inner Chapters

 

"Assured! his stability, but not rigid:
Pervasive! his tenuous influence, but it is not on display.
Lighthearted!  Seems to be doing as he pleases:
Under compulsion!  Inevitable that he does it.
Impetuously! asserts a manner of his own:
Cautiously! holds the Power which is his own.
So tolerant! in his seeming worldliness:
So arrogant! in his refusal to be ruled.
Canny!  Seems he likes to keep his mouth shut:
Scatterbrained!  Forgets every word that he says."
Chuang-Tzu, Chapter 6.4
Translation by Angus Graham, Chuang-Tzu: The Inner Chapters, 1981, 2000, p. 85

 

'The Genuine Human Beings of old seemed to do whatever was called for but were not partisan to any one course.  They appeared to be in want but accepted no assistance.  Taking part in all things, they were solitary but never rigid.  Spreading out everywhere, they were empty but never insubstantial.  Cheerful, they seemed to be enjoying themselves.  Impelled along, they did what they could not help doing.  The let everything gather within them but still it manifested outwardly to the world as their own countenance.  They gave it all away, but still it rested securely with them as their own Virtuosity.  Leprous with symptoms, they seem just like everyone else.  Haughty, nothing could control them.  Oblivious, they would forget what they were saying."
Zhuangzi, Chapter 6.4
Translation by Brook Ziporyn, Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings, 2009, p. 41

 

"The true man in ancient times was upright but impartial, humble but not servile.  He had distinct natural characteristics but was not adamant about them; his humility was evident but not displayed.  Pleasant and composed, he seemed to be content.  His actions appeared to spring from necessity.  People were drawn to his virtue; he seemed to comply with the age but with a certain reserve.  His independence of spirit was limitless.  Endeavoring to remain silent, he forgot what he wished to say."
Zhuangzi, Chapter 6.4
Translated by Hyun Hochsmann and Yang Guorong, Zhuangzi, 2007, p.117

 

"The true man of old
Was towering in stature but never collapses,
Seem insufficient but accepted nothing.
Aloofly independent but not obstinate,
Amply empty but not ostentatious,
Demurring, as though he were compelled,
Suffused with an alluring charm,
Endowed with an arresting integrity,
Stern, as though he were worldly,
Arrogant, as though he were uncontrollable,
Reticent, as though he preferred to clam up,
Absent-minded, as thought he forgot what to say."
Chuang Tzu, Chapter 6.4
Translated by Victor H. Mair, Wandering on the Way: Early Taoist Tales and Parables of Chuang Tzu, 1994, p.52
 

 

 

 

 

"Yan Hui saw Confucius again and said, "I have made progress."
"What do you mean?" asked Confucius.
"I sit and forget everything."
Confucius was alarmed and asked, "What do you mean by sitting down and forgetting everything?"
Yan Hui replied, "I leave behind my body, perception and knowledge.  Detached from both material form and mind. 
I become one with that which penetrates all things.  This I call sitting and forgetting everything."
Confucius said, "If you are one with that which penetrates all things you will be free from partiality.  If you are
transformed thus you have become evanescent.  You are truly a worthy man.  I ask to follow your steps."
Zhuangzi, Book 6
Translated by Hyun Hochsmann and Yang Guorong,  Zhuangzi, 2007, p. 123. 


Zuowang: Sitting and Forgetting, Taoist Meditation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

***********************

 

 

"Great wisdom is generous; petty wisdom is contentious." 

 

 

"Rewards and punishments are the lowest form of education."

 

"The quintessence of the utmost Way is Dark, dark, secret, secret: the apex of the utmost Way is mystery, mystery, silence, silence. Look at nothing, listen to nothing."

 

"Once Zhuangzi dreamt he was a butterfly, a butterfly flitting and fluttering around, happy with himself and doing as he pleased. He didn't know he was Zhuangzi. Suddenly he woke up and there he was, solid and unmistakable Zhuangzi. But he didn't know if he was Zhuangzi who had dreamt he was a butterfly, or a butterfly dreaming he was Zhuangzi. Between Zhuangzi and a butterfly there must be some distinction! This is called the Transformation of Things."
-   Zhuangzi, Chapter 2, Translated by Burton Watson

 

"We cling to our own point of view, as though everything depended on it. Yet our opinions have no permanence; like autumn and winter, they gradually pass away.

 

"If water derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind! The mind of the sage, being in repose, becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation."

 

"Once upon a time, I, Chuang Tzu, dreamt I was a butterfly, fluttering hither and thither, to all intents and purposes a butterfly. I was conscious only of following my fancies as a butterfly, and was unconscious of my individuality as a man. Suddenly, I awaked, and
there I lay, myself again. Now I do not know whether I was then a man dreaming I was a butterfly, or whether I am now a butterfly, dreaming I am a man. Between a man and a butterfly there is necessarily a barrier. The transition is called Metempsychosis." 
Zhuangzi, Chapter 2, Translated by Herbert A. Giles 

 

"All existing things are really one. We regard those that are beautiful and rare as valuable, and those that are ugly as foul and rotten The foul and rotten may come to be transformed into what is rare and valuable, and the rare and valuable into what is foul and rotten."

 

"Flow with whatever is happening and let your mind be free. Stay centered by accepting whatever you are doing. This is the ultimate."

 

"The wise man looks into space and does not regard the small as too little, nor the great as too big, for he knows that, there is no limit to dimensions."

 

"A frog in a well cannot conceive of the ocean."

 

"Those who realize their folly are not true fools."

 

"Life comes from the earth and life returns to the earth."

 


"In the primeval mass there is no shape, spreading and scattering, leaving no trail behind, in the darkness of its depths there is no sound. It moves without direction, resides in Mystery."

 

"Forget the years, forget distinctions. Leap into the boundless and make it your home!" 

 

"I know the joy of fishes in the river through my own joy, as I go walking along the same river."

 

"There is order in chaos, and certainty in doubt. The wise are guided by this order and certainty."  

 

    "When Zhuangzi was about to die, his disciples wanted to bury him in a well-appointed tomb. Zhuangzi said, ''I have the sky and the earth for inner and outer coffins the sun and the moon for jade disks the stars for pearls and the ten thousand things for farewell gifts. Isn't the paraphernalia for my burial adequate without adding anything?"  ''We are afraid the crows and kites will eat you master," a disciple said. 
    "Above ground, I will be eaten by crows and kites; below ground by ants. You are robbing from the one to give to the other. Why play favorites'''

 

"I know the joy of fishes in the river through my own joy, as I go walking along the same river."  

 

"Those who seek to satisfy the mind of man by hampering it with ceremonies and music and affecting charity and devotion have lost their original nature."

 

"Happiness is the absence of the striving for happiness." 

 

"A way is made by walking it.  A thing is so by calling it." 

 

"In ultimate sameness you have no self; and without self from where would you get to have anything."

 

"Easy is right. Begin right and you are easy. Continue easy and you are right. The right way to go easy is to forget the right way and forget that the going is easy."

 

 

The Way of Chuang Tzu (Second Edition).   Translated by Thomas Merton

Chuang Tzu: The Inner Chapters.   Translated by David Hinton

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices.    By Mike Garofalo

The Book of Chuang Tzu.   Translated by Martin Palmer and Elizabeth Breuilly

Wandering on the Way: Early Taoist Tales and Parables of Chuang Tzu Translation and commentary Victor H. Mair

 

                                      

 

 

"Those who value what is on the outside are clumsy on the inside."

 

    "Root of Heaven roamed on the south side of Mount Vast. When he came to the bank of Clear Stream he met Nameless Man and asked him. "Please tell me how to manage the world." 
    "Go away you dunce." Nameless Man said. "Such questions are no fun I was Just about to join the Creator of Things. If I get bored with that, I'll climb on the bird Merges with the Sky and soar beyond the six directions. I'll visit Nothing Whatever town and stay in Boundless country. Why do you bring up managing the world to disturb my thoughts?"
    Still Root of Heaven repeated his question and Nameless Man responded "Let your rnind wander among the insipid, blend your energies with the featureless, spontaneously accord with things, and you will have no room for selfishness. Then the world will be in order.""

 

"Men honor what lies within the sphere of their knowledge, but do not realize how dependent they are on what lies beyond it.

 

"To stop leaving tracks is easy. Not to walk upon the ground is hard." 

 

"You can’t talk to hole-in-the-corner scholars about the Way, because they are constricted by their doctrines."

 

"As for goods and possession, the great man does not compete for them."

 

"How do I know that enjoying life is not a delusion? How do I know that in hating death we are not like people who got lost in early childhood and do not know the way home? Lady Li was the child of a border guard in Ai. When first captured by the state of Jin, she wept so much her clothes were soaked. But after she entered the palace, shared the king's bed, and dined on the finest meats, she regretted her tears. How do I know that the dead do not regret their previous longing for life? One who dreams of drinking wine may in the morning weep; one who dreams weeping may in the morning go out to hunt. During our dreams we do not know we are dreaming. We may even dream of interpreting a dream. Only on waking do we know it was a dream. Only after the great awakening will we realize that this is the great dream. And yet fools think they are awake, presuming to know that they are rulers or herdsmen. How dense! You and Confucius are both dreaming, and I who say you are a dream am also a dream. Such is my tale. It will probably be called preposterous, but after ten thousand generations there may be a great sage who will be able to explain it, a trivial interval equivalent to the passage from morning to night."

 

"You will always find an answer in the sound of water." 

 

"Where there is no opposition between this view and that view, there is the pivot of the dao.  As soon as this pivot is found, we stand in the centre where we can respond without an end to changing views.  So I say that there is nothing which can surpass the light of the mind."  [Z 2] 

 

 

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Information about Zhuangzi and Taoism

 

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang, Kwang-dze)  369—286 BCE

 

"Chuang Tzu (369 - 268 B.C.) was a leading thinker representing the Taoist strain in Chinese thought. Using parable and anecdote, allegory and paradox, he set forth the early ideas of what was to become the Taoist school. Central in these is the belief that only by understanding Tao (the Way of Nature) and dwelling in unity can man achieve true happiness and be truly free, in both life and death. Witty and imaginative, enriched by brilliant imagery, making sportive use of both mythological and historical personages (including even Confucius), the book, which bears Chuang Tzu’s name, has for centuries been savored by Chinese readers. Chuang Tzu espoused a holistic philosophy of life, encouraging disengagement from the artificialities of socialization, and cultivation of our natural“ancestral”potencies and skills, in order to live a simple and natural, but full and flourishing life. He was critical of our ordinary categorizations and evaluations, noting the multiplicity of different modes of understanding between different creatures, cultures, and philosophical schools, and the lack of an independent means of making a comparative evaluation. He advocated a mode of understanding that is not committed to a fixed system, but is fluid and flexible, and that maintains a provisional, pragmatic attitude towards the applicability of these categories and evaluations."
Taoism: Laozi and Zhuangzi  

 

 

"Not much is known of the life of Chuang Tzu. The Shih Chi (Historical Records, written about 100 B.C.) tells us that he was a contemporary of King Hui of Liang (370-319) and King Hsüan of Ch'i (319-301). Thus Chuang Tzu seems to have been a contemporary of Mencius (372-289), but neither was mentioned by the other in his extant writings. The Shih Chi also says that Chuang Tzu was born in Meng on the border of Shantung and Honan and that he held a petty official post for a time in Ch'iyüan. However, he seems to have lived most of his life as a recluse, "to be intoxicated in the wonder and the power of Nature.  Legend has it that Chuang Tzu declined the honor of being prime minister to King Wei of Ch'u (339-329), saying that he much preferred to be a live tortoise wagging its tail in the mud than a dead one venerated in a golden casket in a king's ancestral shrine. (The story is apocryphal, but it is highly illustrative of the mentality of the Taoist mystic, who cared more for personal freedom than for high office.  Chuang Tzu's greatness lay in his bringing early Taoism to its full completion. While he was true to the Taoist doctrine of wu-wei (refraining from action contrary to Nature), he extended the Taoist system and carried out metaphysical speculations never heard of by the early Taoists. The philosophy of Chuang Tzu, as characterized by its emphasis on the unity and spontaneity of the Tao, its assertion of personal freedom, and its doctrine of relativity of things, is essentially a plea for the "return to Nature" and free development of man's inherent nature. It is in fact a kind of romantic philosophy that favors anarchistic individualism and condemns Confucian virtues and institutions - a philosophy, in short, that idealizes the state of natural simplicity marked by no will, no consciousness, no knowledge."
Zhuangzi: A Brief Biography

 

 

"The currently extant text known as the Zhuangzi is the result of the editing and arrangement of the Jin dynasty thinker and commentator Guo Xiang (Kuo Hsiang, d. 312 CE). He reduced what was then a work in fifty-two chapters to the current edition of thirty-three chapters, excising material that he considered to be spurious. His commentary on the text provides an interpretation that has been highly influential over the subsequent centuries.  Guo Xiang divided the thirty-three chapters into three collections, known as the Inner Chapters (Neipian), the Outer Chapters (Waipian), and the Miscellaneous Chapters (Zapian). The Inner Chapters are the first seven chapters and are considered to be the work of Zhuangzi himself. The Outer Chapters are chapters 8 to 22, and the Miscellaneous Chapters are chapters 23 to 33. The Outer and Miscellaneous Chapters can be further subdivided."
Zhuangzi, The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy 

 

 

Chuang Tsu: Inner Chapters.   Translation by Gia-fu Feng and Jane English

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

Wandering on the Way: Early Taoist Tales and Parables of Chuang Tzu Translation and commentary Victor H. Mair

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   By Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

 

                                   

 

 

 

 

 

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Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching

Research by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Grove, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

This webpage was last modified or updated on January 1, 2014.   
This webpage was first distributed online on April 15, 2007.
 

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Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

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