Chapter 36

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

Chapter 35     Chapter 37     Index to All the Chapters     Taoism     Cloud Hands Blog

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Chapter 36

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Want or Wish (), Weaken, Strengthen, Shrink or Reduce (hsi), Lower, Raise, Must or Surely (pi), Hidden, Necessary (ku), Exposed, Expand or Open (chang), Soft, Hard, Week or Feeble (jo), Paradox, Secret, Strong or Power (ch'iang), Fish, Sea, Abandon or Reject (fei), State, Raise or Uplift (hsing), Government, Treasures, Deprive or Take (to), Lighten, Darken, Give or Endow (), Opposite, Mystery or Secret (wei), Complimentary, Transform, Enlightened or Discerning (ming), Weapons, Tender or Gentle (jou), Insight, Victory or Conquer (shêng), Wisdom, Hard or Stiff (kang), Security, Fish (), Inhale, Taken or Separated (t'o), Exhale, Breath, Ignorance, Deep or Abyss (yüan), Concealment, Empire or State (kuo), Overturning, Profit or Benefit (li), Reversal, Weapons or Tools or Vessels (ch'i), Subtle, Shown or Revealed (shih), People or Others (jên),   微明 


Términos en Español: 
Debilitar, Fortalecer, Baja, Levante, Oculto, Expuesto, Suave, Duro, Fuerte, Paradoja, Secreto, Pez, Mar, Estado, Gobierno, Tesoros, Aclarar, Oscurecer, Opuesto, Transformar, Armas, Perspicacia, Sabiduría, Seguridad, Inhalar, Exhalar, Respircación, Ignorancia, Ocultación, Vuelco, Inversión, Sutil, Quiere, Desear, Encoger, Reducir, Debe, Seguramente, es Necesario, Expanda, Abierto, Débil, Fuerte, Poder, Abandono, Rechazo, Levantar, Levantamiento, Privar, Tome, Misterio, Secreto, Iluminado, Discernimiento, Tierno, Suave, Victoria, Conquer, duro, Rígido, Pescado, Tomado, Separado, Profundo, Abismo, Imperio, Estado, Armas, Herramientas, Instrumentos, Mostrado, Revelado, Personas, Otros. 

 

 

 

"When one is about to take an inspiration, he is sure to make a previous expiration. 
When he is going to weaken another, he will first strengthen him.  
When he is going to overthrow another, he will first have raised him up. 
When he he is going to despoil another, he will first have made gifts to him.  
This is called 'hiding the light' of his procedure. 
The soft overcomes the hard; and the weak the strong.
Fishes should not be taken from the deep. 
The instruments for the profit of a state should not be shown to the people."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 36   

 

 

"Contraction pulls at that which extends too far
Weakness pulls at that which strengthens too much
Ruin pulls at that which rises too high
Loss pulls at life when you fill it with too much stuff
The lesson here is called he wisdom of obscurity
The gentle outlast the strong
The obscure outlast the obvious
Hence, a fish that ventures from deep water is soon snagged by a net
A country that reveals its strength is soon conquered by an enemy"
-  Translated by Jonathan Star, 2001, Chapter 36  

 

 

"If we want to fold something up, we must first spread it out.
If we want to weaken something, we must first strengthen it.
If we want to get rid of something, we must first encourage it.
If we want to have something, we must first let it go.

This is called The Secret Wisdom:
That the soft and the weak shall overcome the hard and the strong.

As a fish should not be taken from its pool,
so a country’s resources should not be displayed."
-  Translated by Roderic and Amy Sorrell, 2003, Chapter 36

 

 

"When one feels a desire to concentrate it in one's own heart, it is imperatively necessary to display it openly.
When one feels a desire to cultivate it in its pliant phase, it is imperatively necessary to fortify and strengthen one's own powers. 
When one feels a desire to abandon or neglect it, it is imperatively necessary to stir up one's mind afresh in its pursuit. 
If anyone feels a desire to obtain it, it is imperatively necessary that it should be imparted to him.
By this means, the hidden phases of Tao will become clear.
The weak and pliable overcomes the strong and hard.
A fish cannot leave the depths.
The treasures of a State should not be employed to influence the people."
-  Translated by Henry Balfour, 1884, Chapter 36

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"That which is about to contract has surely been expanded.
That which is about to weaken has surely been strengthened.
That which is about to fall has surely been raised.
That which is about to be despoiled has surely been endowed.  
This is an explanation of the secret that the tender and the weak conquer the hard and the strong.  
As the fish should not escape from the deep, so with the country's sharp tools the people should not become acquainted."
-  Translated by Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki and Paul Carus, 1913, Chapter 36   

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"In order to contract a thing, one should surely expand it first.
In order to weaken, one will surely strengthen first.
In order to overthrow, one will surely exalt first.
'In order to take, one will surely give first.'
This is called subtle wisdom.
The soft and the weak can overcome the hard and the strong.
As the fish should not leave the deep
So should the sharp implements of a nation not be shown to anyone."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 36 

 

 

"In order to shrink it, it must first be stretched out.
In order to weaken it, it must first be made strong.
In order to throw down it, it must first be set on high.
In order to obtain it, it must first be given.
That is subtle and wise.
The soft overcomes the hard.
The weak overcomes the strong.
The fish cannot leave the deep.
The useful instruments of the nation must not be displayed to the people."
-  Translated by Tien Cong Tran, Chapter 36  

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"Whatever is gathered in
Must first be stretched out;
Whatever is weakened
Must first be made strong;
Whatever is abandoned
Must first be joined;
Whatever is taken away
Must first be given.
This is what is called the subtle within what is evident.
The soft and weak vanquish the hard and strong.
Fishes should not relinquish the depths.
The sharpest instruments of state should not be revealed to others."
-  Translated by Roger T. Ames and Donald L. Hall, 2003, Chapter 36 

 

 

將欲歙之, 必固張之.
將欲弱之, 必固強之.
將欲廢之, 必固興之.
將欲奪之, 必固與之. 
是謂微明. 
柔弱勝剛強. 
魚不可脫於淵.
國之利器不可以示人. 
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 36

 

 

chiang yü hsi chih, pi ku chang chih.
chiang yü jo chih, pi ku ch'iang chih.
chiang yü fei chih, pi ku hsing chih.
chiang yü to chih, pi ku yü chih.
shih wei wei ming.
jou jo shêng kang ch'iang.
yü pu k'o t'o yü yüan.
kuo chih li ch'i, pu k'o yi shih jên.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 36 

 


Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 36 of the Tao Te Ching

 


jiang yu xi zhi, bi gu zhang zhi. 
jiang yu ruo zhi, bi gu qiang zhi.
jiang yu fei zhi, bi gu xing zhi.
jiang yu duo zhi, bi gu yu zhi.
shi wei wei ming.
rou ruo sheng gang qiang.
yu bu ke tuo yu yuan.
guo zhi li qi, bu ke yi shi ren.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 36 

 
 
 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin and Wade Giles Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"That which is to be shrunk
must first be stretched out.
That which is to be weakened
must first be strengthened.
That which is to be cast down
must first be raised up.
That which is to be taken
must first be given.

There is wisdom in dimming your light.
For the soft and gentle
will overcome the hard and powerful.

Fish are best left in deep waters.
And, weapons are best kept out of sight."
-  Translated by Tolbert McCarroll, 1982, Chapter 36

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching  Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni.
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu  Translated by Brian Walker. 

Tao Te Ching Index by Mike Garofalo

Tao - The Way  Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles.  
Taoism: An Essential Guide  By Eva Wong. 

 

                                 

 

 

 

"When you wish to contract something,
You must momentarily expand it;
When you wish to weaken something,
You must momentarily strengthen it;
When you wish to reject something,
You must momentarily join with it;
When you wish to seize something,
You must momentarily give it up.
This is called "subtle insight."
The soft and weak conquer the strong.
Fish cannot be removed from the watery depths;
The profitable instruments of state cannot be shown to the people."
-  Translated by Victor H. Mair, 1990, Chapter 36 

 

 

"What is in the end to be shrunken,
Begins by being first stretched out.
What is in the end to be weakened,
Begins by being first made strong.
What is in the end to be thrown down,
Begins by being first set on high.
What is in the end to be despoiled,
Begins by being first richly endowed.

Herein is the subtle wisdom of life:
The soft and weak overcomes the hard and strong.

Just as the fish must not leave the deeps,
So the ruler must not display his weapons."
-  Translated by John C. H. Wu, 1961, Chapter 36  

 

 

"In order to draw breath, first empty the lungs.
To weaken another, first strengthen him.
To overthrow another, first exalt him.
To despoil another, first load him with gifts; this is called the Occult Regimen.
The soft conquereth the hard; the weak pulleth down the strong.
The fish that leaveth ocean is lost; the method of government must be
concealed from the people."
-  Translated by Aleister Crowley, 1918, Chapter 36 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons


                             

 

 

 

"What's in the end to be shrunk can first be stretched.
The one who is to be made to dwindle in power can first be caused to expand; and then it's necessary
first to expand.
Whatever is to be weakened must begin by being made strong.
He who is to be laid low can first be exalted to power.
So: first promote, next destroy. Or: To destroy, first promote.
What's to be overthrown must begin by being set up.
He who would be a taker must begin as a giver.
And this is the fine art of dimming one's light.
According to this the soft overcomes the hard; and the weak, the strong.
Fish should be left in the deep pool, not taken away from water.
Sharp weapons of the state should not be displayed, but left where nobody can see them."
-  Translated by T. Byrn, 1997, Chapter 36 

 

 

"Whatever shrinks
Must first have expanded.
Whatever becomes weak
Must first have been strong.
That which is to be destroyed
Must first have flourished.
In order to receive,
One must first give.

This is called seeing the nature of things.
The soft overcomes the hard, and the weak overcomes the strong.

As fish cannot be taken from the water,
So a ruler should not reveal to the people his means of government."
-  Translated by Keith H. Seddon, Chapter 36 

 

 

"If a thing is capable of being contracted, no doubt is was previously expanded;
It a thing is capable of being weakened, no doubt it was previously strengthened.
Exaltation precedes abasement.
He who would take must first give.
This is the Secret Law,
Whereby the soft and the weak overcome the hard and the strong.
Leave the fish in the depths of the water, out of harm's way;
And leave the nation's sharpest weapons where they cannot be seen."
-  Translated by Herman Ould, 1946, Chapter 36 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Tao Te Ching Index by Mike Garofalo

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"The Way of Subtle Light ...
What is to be shrunken
Is first stretched out;
What is to be weakened
Is first made strong;
What will be thrown over
Is first raised up;
What will be withdrawn
Is first bestowed.
This indeed is
Subtle Light;
The gentle way
Will overcome
The hard and strong.
As fish should not
Get out of pools,
The realm's edged tools
Should not be shown
To anybody."
-  Translated by Raymond Blackney, Chapter 36  

 

 

"What is to be contracted may need to be expanded;
what is to be weakened may need to be strengthened;
what is to be reduced may need to be increased;
and what is to be reformed may need to be impaired.
This is called "Starting enlightenment".
A fish cannot live out of water.
A country with deadly weapons should never demonstrate them before others."
-  Translated by Tang Zi Chang, Chapter 36 

 

 

"If you want something to return to the source,
you must first allow it to spread out.
If you want something to weaken,
you must first allow it to become strong.
If you want something to be removed,
you must first allow it to flourish.
If you want to possess something,
you must first give it away.
This is called the subtle understanding
of how things are meant to be.
The soft and pliable overcomes the hard and inflexible.
Just as fish remain hidden in deep waters,
it is best to keep weapons out of sight."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 36 

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Tao Te Ching Index by Mike Garofalo

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

 

                                     

 
 
 

"If you desire to breathe deeply, you must first empty the lungs.
If you desire to be strong, you must first learn to be weak.
If you desire to be in a lofty position, you must first learn to take a lowly position.
If you desire to be enriched by gifts, you must first give away all that you have.
This is called concealment and enlightenment.
The soft overcomes the hard.
The weak overcomes the strong.
Fish cannot swim safely in shallow waters.
The secrets of government of a kingdom should not be revealed to the people."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 36 

 

 

"If one would contract something, then one must first resolutely spread it out.
If one would weaken something, then one must first resolutely strengthen it.
If one would have a thing be discarded one must first resolutely cause it to flourish.
If one would seize something one must first resolutely give it away.
This approach is called subtle discernment.
The pliant and weak overcome the rigid and strong.
So fish cannot leave the depths and the sharp instruments of the state cannot be shown to threaten the people."
-  Translated by Patrick E. Moran, Chapter 36  

 

 

"What is in the end to be shrunk
Must first be stretched.
Whatever is to be weakened
Must begin by being made strong.
What is to be overthrown
Must begin by being set up.
He who would be a taker
Must begin as a giver.
This is called “dimming” one's light.
It is thus that the soft overcomes the hard
And the weak, the strong.
“It is best to leave the fish down in his pool;
Best to leave the State's sharpest weapons where none can see them.”
-  Translated by Arthur Waley, 1934, Chapter 36 

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   By Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"What is about to contract itself is sure to lengthen itself,

What is about to weaken itself is sure to strengthen itself,

What is about to ruin itself assuredly first uplifts,

And what is about to despoil itself it first endows with gifts.

 

To hidden enlightenment it is that truths like these belong,

The tender and weak overcome and conquer the rigid and the strong,

As fishes perish miserably, escaping from the deep,

The sharp tools of the State, from sight of the people keep!"
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 36 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

 

 

 

 

"That which will be shrunk
Must first be stretched.
That which will be weakened
Must first be strengthened.
That which will be torn down
Must first be raised up.
That which will be taken
Must first be given.
This is called "subtle illumination."
The gentle and soft overcomes the hard and aggressive.
A fish cannot leave the water.
The country's potent weapons
Should not be shown to its people."
-  Translated by Charles Muller, 1891, Chapter 36 

 

 

"Was du zusammendrücken willst,
das mußt du erst richtig sich ausdehnen lassen.
Was du schwächen willst,
das mußt du erst richtig stark werden lassen.
Was du vernichten willst,
das mußt du erst richtig aufblühen lassen.
Wem du nehmen willst,
dem mußt du erst richtig geben.
Das heißt Klarheit über das Unsichtbare.
Das Weiche siegt über das Harte.
Das Schwache siegt über das Starke.
Den Fisch darf man nicht der Tiefe entnehmen.
Des Reiches Förderungsmittel
darf man nicht den Leuten zeigen."
-  Translated by Richard Wilhelm, 1911, Chapter 36

 

 

"In order to reduce it, first expand it.
In order to weaken it, first strengthen it.
In order to abolish it, first establish it.
In order to take it, first give it.
This is called subtle wisdom.
Flexibility and compromise win out over stiffness and aggressiveness.
Fish cannot leave water.
Never show the country's best weapons to the enemy."
-  Translated by Thomas Z. Zhang, Chapter 36 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"When about to inhale it is certainly necessary to open the mouth;
when about to weaken it is certainly necessary to strengthen;
when about to discard it is certainly necessary to promote;
when about to take away it is certainly necessary to impart – this is atomic perception.
The weak overcome the strong.
Fish cannot leave the deeps.
The innerness of the government cannot be shown to the people."
-  Translated by C. Spurgeon Medhurst, 1905, Chapter 36

 

 

"What is to be reduced,
Must first be expanded.
What is to be weakened,
Must first be made strong (ch'iang).
What is to be abolished,
Must first be established.
What is to be taken away,
Must first be given.
This is called the subtle illumination (wei ming).
The soft and weak overcome the hard and strong.
Fish must not leave the stream.
Sharp weapons (ch'i) of a state,
Must not be displayed."
-  Translated by Ellen Marie Chen, 2000, Chapter 36 

 

 

"When you wish to contract something, you must first briefly expand it.
To weaken something, you must first briefly make it stronger.
To reject something, you must first momentarily join with it.
When you wish to seize something, you must first not be grasping it.
This is a 'subtle' insight!

The soft and the weak conquer the strong.

Fish cannot be removed alive from their watery depths;
the profit-making instruments of State cannot be shown to the masses."
-  Translated by Jerry C. Welch, 1998, Chapter 36  

 

 

"Lorsqu'une créature est sur le point de se contracter, on reconnaît avec certitude que dans l'origine elle a eu de l'expansion.
Est-elle sur le point de s'affaiblir, on reconnaît avec certitude que dans l'origine elle a eu de la force.
Est-elle sur le point de dépérir, on reconnaît avec certitude que dans l'origine elle a eu de la splendeur.
Est-elle sur le point d'être dépouillée de tout, on reconnaît avec certitude que dans l'origine elle a été comblée de dons.
Cela s'appelle une doctrine à la fois cachée et éclatante.
Ce qui est mou triomphe de ce qui est dur; ce qui est faible triomphe de ce qui est fort.
Le poisson ne doit point quitter les abîmes; l'arme acérée du royaume ne doit pas être montrée au peuple." 
-  Translated by Stanislas Julien, 1842, Chapter 36 

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

 

"Lo que ha de ser al final contraído, tiene que ser primero dilatado.
Lo que ha de ser al final debilitado, tiene que ser primero fortalecido.
Lo que ha de ser al final deschado, comienza por ser primero ensalzado. 
Lo que ha de ser al final despojado, comienza primero por ser dotado. 
Aguí radica la sutil sabiduria de la vida. 
Lo blando y lo débil triunfa sobre lo duro y lo fuerte. 
Lo mismo que el pez no debe abandonar las profundidades, el gobernante no debe mostrar sus armas."
-  Translation from Chinese to English by John C. H. Wu, translated into Spanish by Alfonso Colodrón,
Capítulo 36 

 

 

"Para que algo sea contraído,
antes debe ser expandido.
Para que algo sea debilitado,
antes debe ser fortalecido.
Para que algo sea destruido,
antes debe ser levantado.
Para que alguien obtenga algo,
antes alguien debe haberlo dado.
Este es el Misterio Oculto.
Lo tierno y lo débil
vencen lo duro y fuerte.
Los peces no deben salir de las profundidades de las aguas,
al igual que el reino no debe exhibir sus armas."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013,
Capítulo 36 

 

 

Si quieres qué algo se contraiga,antes tienes que dejar que se expanda.
Si quieres que algo se debilite, antes necesitas hacerlo fuerte.
Si quieres que algo caiga hacia abajo es menester que lo levantes en alto.
Si quieres despojar a alguien de algo, antes tienes que enriquecerlo.
Esta es la sutil sabiduría de la vida.
Lo débil y lo frágil vencen a lo duro y a lo fuerte.
Que nunca salga el pez de la profundidad del agua.
Las armas del reino no se muestran al extranjero."
Translation from Logia Medio Dia, 2015,
Capítulo 36 

 

 

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This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 


 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 36

 

Tao Te Ching, Translations into English: Terebess Asia Online (TAO).  124 nicely formatted complete English language translations, on separate webpages, of the Daodejing.  Alphabetical index by translators.  Each webpage has all 81 chapters of the Tao Te Ching translated into English.  An outstanding collection─ the Best on the Internet. 


Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español


Concordance to the Daodejing


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 36 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi.  Seven Star Communications, 2006, 240 pages. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept


Tao Te Ching English Translations from Terebess Asia Online.  Over 30 translations. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 36, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2015. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 


This webpage was last modified or updated on August 7, 2015.  
 
This webpage was first distributed online on April 9, 2011. 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

Michael P. Garofalo's E-mail

Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, California

Study Chi Kung or Tai Chi with Mike Garofalo 

 

 

 

 


Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides

Cloud Hands Blog

Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

Bodymind Theory and Practices, Somaesthetics

The Five Senses

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons

Grandmaster Chang San Feng

Virtues

Qigong (Chi Kung) Health Practices

One Old Daoist Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81