Chapter 43

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

Chapter 42     Chapter 44     Index to All the Chapters     Taoism     Cloud Hands Blog

English     Chinese     Spanish

 

 

 

Chapter 43

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Emptiness, Heaven (t'ien), Space, Weak, Hard or Strong (chien), Void, Non-Action, Softness, Know or Understand (chih), Spaciousness, Universal, Wu Wei, Fullness, Stone, Action or Doing (wei), Misunderstood, Reach or Obtain (chi), Ineffable, Showing, Accomplishment, Gentleness, Strong, No Expectations, Soft or Yielding (jou), Hard, Power, Yield, Water, Seamless, Penetrable, Benefit or Increase (yi), Impenetrable, Teachings or Doctrine (chiao), Not Acting, Overcoming the Impossible, Wordless Teaching, Existence or Being (yu), Without or Not (wu), Space or Room (chien),  偏用 


Términos en Español:  Vacío, Cielo, Espacio, Débil, Fuerte, No-acción, Suavidad, Amplitud, Universal, Plenitud, Piedra, Incomprendido, Inefable, Exhibir, Realización, Mansedumbre, Suave, Duro, Rendimiento, Agua, Sin Costura, Penetrable, Superar lo Imposible, Enseñanza Sin Palabras, Ser, Espacio, Sala, Grieta, Conocer, Comprender, Sin, Acción, Hacer, Beneficio, Aumentar, Enseñanzas, Doctrina, Reach, Obtener, Duro, Alcance. 

 

 

 

"Under Heaven, the weakest things overcome the strongest.
Non-Being requires no Space.
I know this; that non-action has advantages which it teaches without words.
Seek to attain the benefits of non-action under Heaven."
-  Translated by Karl Kromal, 2002, Chapter 43    

 

 

"The soft overcomes the hard in the world as a gentle rider controls a galloping horse.
That without substance can penetrate where there is no space.
By these I know the benefit of nonaction.
Teaching without words, working without actions-nothing in the world can compare with them."
-  Translated by Brian Browne Walker, 1996, Chapter 43

 

 

"The world's softest can over-run the world's hardest.
It comes from the unknown (non-existence) and it enters no space.
From this we know how advantageous is non-interference!
Thus, education by non-preaching and the policy of non-interference
have merits with which nothing under heaven can compare."
-  Translated by Tang Zi-Chang, Chapter 43

 

 

"That which is softest in the world overrides that which is hardest in the world.
Only that which has no existence can enter that which has no crevice.
Therefore, I know the benefit of non-action.
Teaching without words
And benefit without action;
Few in the world attain it."
-  Translated by Yi Wu, Chapter 43

 

 

"Seeing how things are, what is easy will overpass the heavy,
That has not come yet will replace that it is now,
Non-action is thus superior to the action.
Very few in the world can instruct without words,
This is the way of the Wise Person."
-  Translated by Sarbatoare, Chapter 43

 

 

"The soft things of the world can overcome the hard ones.
Those that have no substance can penetrate the solid.
Therefore I know non-action wins success.

Teaching without words,
Succeeding without action -
These are understood by the very few."
-  Translated by Agnieszka Solska, 2005, Chapter 43  

 

 

"The softest things in all the world can overcome the hardest things in all the world.
Only Nothingness can penetrate spacelessness.
That is why I understand the benefit of not acting.
The teaching that is wordless, the benefit of not acting -
seldom in the world are these things understood."  
-  Translated by Tim Chilcott, 2005, Chapter 43    

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"The softest of stuff in the world
Penetrates quickly the hardest;
Insubstantial, it enters
Where no room is.
By this I know the benefit
Of something done by quiet being;
In all the world but few can know
Accomplishment apart from work,
Instruction when no words are used."
-  Translated by Raymond B. Blakney, 1955, Chapter 43 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"The most flexible wins out over the stiffest.
The shapeless can be omnipresent.
I know it is beneficial not use brute force.
The best in the world teach without preaching, and act without using force."
-  Translated by Thomas Z. Zhang, Chapter 43 

 

 

"The most yielding of all things
overcomes the hardest of all things.
That which has no substance
enters where there is no crevice.
Hence, I know the value of action without striving.
Few things under heaven bring more benefit than
the lessons learned from silence and
the actions taken without striving."
-  Translated by Tolbert McCarroll, 1982, Chapter 43 

 

 

"Yielding Maintains a Balance

Be gentle and tender with one another
without being passive.
Passivity leads to resentment
while gentleness gives birth to understanding.
Yield to each other
without surrendering.
Surrendering means the loss of self hood
while yielding maintains the balance
of self and other.

Martial artists know this truth.
A soft flexible body survives
the hardest of attacks
with balance and poise.
A rigid body is easily broken.
Look to your gentleness,
practice your flexibility.
At the same time maintain
your balance and your self hood."
-  Translated by William Martin, 1999, Chapter 43 

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons


                             

 

 

 

"The softest overcomes the hardest, by yielding.
Emptiness can enter where there is no space.
The value of non-action is in acting naturally.
Therefore the master teaches of what is beyond words.
And his acts carry no expectations."
-  Translated by David Bullen, Chapter 43  

 

 

 

A Chinese Language Version of Chapter 43 of the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
A note on my style of displaying the Chinese characters of the Tao Te Ching


 

 

天下之至柔, 馳騁天下之至堅. 
無有入無間.
吾是以知無為之有益. 
不言之教.
無為之益, 天下希及之. 
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching Chapter 43 

 

 

t'ien hsia chih chih jou, ch'ih ch'êng t'ien hsia chih chih chien.
wu yu ju wu chien.
wu shih yi chih wu wei chih yu yi.
pu yen chih chiao.
wu wei chih yi, t'ien hsia hsi chi chih.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 43 

 


Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 43 of the Tao Te Ching

 


tian xia zhi zhi rou, chi cheng tian xia zhi zhi jian.
wu you ru wu jian.
wu shi yi zhi wu wei zhi you yi.
bu yan zhi jiao.
wu wei zhi yi, tian xia xi ji zhi.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 43 

 

 

1-5
(2834-2838)


tian1 . xia4 . zhi1 . zhi4 . rou2
.
6-7
(2839-2840)


chi2 . cheng3
.
8-12
(2841-2845)


tian1 . xia4 . zhi1 . zhi4 . jian1
.
13-26
(2846-2859)
     
     
wu2 . you3 . . ru4 . wu2 . jian1 . . wu2 . shi4 . yi3 . zhi1 . . wu2 . wei2 . zhi1 . you3 . yi4
.
27-30
(2860-2863)


bu4 . yan2 . zhi1 . jiao1
.
31-34
(2864-2867)


wu2 . wei2 . zhi1 . yi4
.
35-39
(2868-2872)


tian1 . xia4 . xi1 . ji2 . zhi1

Laozi Daodejing Siegelschrift Seal Script, Chapter 43 

 
 
 
 
 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"As the soft yield of water cleaves obstinate stone,
So to yield with life solves the insoluble:
To yield, I have learned, is to come back again.
But this unworded lesson,
This easy example,
Is lost upon men."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 43 

 

 

 
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"The soft overcomes the hard;
The formless penetrates the impenetrable;
Therefore I value taking no action.
Teaching without words,
Work without action,
Are understood by no one."
-  Translated by Peter Merel, Chapter 43 

 

 

"The softest thing (water) in the universe freely controls the hardest thing (diamond).
Nothing filters through no space.
Herewith I realize the use of no action.
Teaching without words and the use of no action few understand in the universe."
-  Translated by Eichi Shimomisse, 1998, Chapter 43  

 

 

"That which offers no resistance,
overcomes the hardest substances.
That which offers no resistance
can enter where there is no space.

Few in the world can comprehend
the teaching without words,
or understand the value of non-action."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 43    

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"Water, ever fluid,
erodes the most resistant rock.
While what is insubstantial
penetrates the densest block.
Without ado,
non-action demonstrates what it can do.
Wisdom without words,
deeds without doing
are realized by very few."
-  Translated by Douglas Allchin, 2002, Chapter 43    

 

 

"The softest
of all things
Wears down
the hardest of all things.
Only No thing
can enter into
no-space.
I know the
advantages of
doing everything at
its own speed.
Few things
under heaven
teach as much as the
lessons of Silence,
Or are as
helpful as
the fruits of
proper timing."
-  Translated by J. L. Trottier, 1994, Chapter 43 

 

 

"The softest substance of the world
Goes through the hardest.
That-which-is-without-form penetrates that-which-has-no-crevice;
Through this I know the benefit of taking no action.
The teaching without words
And the benefit of taking no action
Are without compare in the universe."
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1955, Chapter 43 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"The softest thing in the world can overcome the hardest.
The shapeless can penetrate the seamless.
Thus I know the value of not acting.
Few understand the wordless teaching of non-action."
-  Translated by Ned Ludd, Chapter 43    

 

 

"Universal Application
Pien Yung


The softest things in the world
Can match and overcome the hardest.
Non-being penetrates even the crackless.
Thus the value of non-interference is clear to me.
The teaching without words,
And the virtue of non-interference,
Can hardly be matched in the world."
-  Translated by Henry Wei, 1982, Chapter 43 

 

 

"The world’s weakest drives the world’s strongest.
The indiscernible penetrates where there are no crevices.
From this I perceive the advantage of non-action.
Few indeed in the world realize the instruction of the silence, or the benefits of inaction."
-  Translated by C. Spurgeon Medhurst, 1905, Chapter 43 

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

 

                                     

 

 

 

"In the world when we arrive at gentleness we press forward to overcome all hardness.
To possess Inner Life we enter it by our own private doorway.
We do this in order to know in overflowing fullness the possession of activity of Inner Life.
Overflowing fullness of activity of Inner Life
With power to impart it to others without words -
Few men in the world attain to this."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 43

 

 

"The softest in the world surpasses the hardest in the world.
Only Nothing can enter into no-space.
Hence, I know the advantages of non-doing.
The teaching of no-word, the beneficial of non-doing.
Very few in the world know."
-  Translated by Tien Cong Tran, Chapter 43 
 

 

 

"The most yielding thing in the world
Masters the hardest thing in the world.
Its nothingness can penetrate even the impenetrable.
That is how I know the value of non-action.
But teaching without the use of words;
And action that is non-action -
How few in the world achieve this!"
-  Translated by Herman Ould, 1946, Chapter 43 

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   By Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"The softest thing, like water, in the world, will gallop over,

And overcome the hardest, as we know,

And what has non-existence will enter everywhere

Though there be no crevices through which to go.

By this I know the benefit of non-assertiveness,

The profit when from acting we refrain,

Silent teaching! passive doing! alas, there are but few

Under heaven this advantage to obtain!"
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 43 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

 

 

 

 

 

"The softest thing in the world dashes against and overcomes the hardest.
That which has no substantial existence enters where there is no crevice.
I know hereby what advantage belongs to doing nothing with a purpose.
There are few in the world who attain to the teaching without words,
     and the advantage arising from non-action."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 43 

 

 

"Das Allerweichste auf Erden überholt das Allerhärteste auf Erden.
Das Nichtseiende dringt auch noch ein in das, was keinen Zwischenraum hat.
Daran erkennt man den Wert des Nicht-Handelns.
Die Belehrung ohne Worte, den Wert des Nicht-Handelns erreichen nur wenige auf Erden."
-  Translated by Richard Wilhelm, 1911, Chapter 43 

 

 

"Von der Wirksamkeit des Unscheinbaren

Das Allerweichste überwindet das Härteste auf Erden.
Das Leere durchdringt selbst das Dichteste.
Darin offenbart sich die hohe Wirksamkeit des Nichtwirkens.
Freilich:
Wenige in der Welt wissen um das Geheimnis
schweigender Belehrung und
nichtwirkenwollenden Wirkens."
-  Translated by Rudolf Backofen, 1949, Chapter 43

 

 

"The softest thing under heaven gallops triumphantly over
The hardest thing under heaven.
Nonbeing penetrates nonspace.
Hence,
I know the advantages of nonaction.
The doctrine without words,
The advantage of nonaction -
few under heaven can realize these!"
-  Translated by Victor H. Mair, 1990, Chapter 43 

 

 

"The most yielding thing in the world will overcome the most rigid
The most empty thing in the world will overcome the most full
From this comes a lesson
Stillness benefits more than action
Silence benefits more than words
Rare indeed are those who are still
Rare indeed are those who are silent
And so I say,
Rare indeed are those who obtain the bounty of this world"
-  Translated by Jonathan Star, 2001, Chapter 43 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"The non-existent can enter into the impenetrable.
By this I know that non-action is useful.
Teaching without words, utility without action-
Few in the world have come to this."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 43

 

 

"Gentleness overcomes rigidity
Non-Being penetrates
Being In that lies the superiority of non-action.
To persuade without words to win without deeds few in the world succeed."
-  Translated by K. O. Schmidt, 1975, Chapter 43 
 

 

 

"What is of all things most yielding
Can overwhelm that which is of all things most hard.
Being substanceless it can enter even where is no space;
That is how I know the value of action that is actionless.
But that there can be teaching without words,
Value in action that is actionless,
Few indeed can understand."
-  Translated by Arthur Waley, 1934, Chapter 43 

 

 

"Les choses les plus molles du monde subjuguent les choses les plus dures du monde.
Le non-être traverse les choses impénétrables.
C'est par là que je sais que le non-agir est utile.
Dans l'univers, il y a bien peu d'hommes qui sachent instruire sans parler et tirer profit du non-agir."
-  Translated by Stanislas Julien, 1842, Chapter 43      

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

 

"Lo más blando del mundo
vence a lo más duro.
La nada penetra donde no hay resquicio.
Por esto conozco la utilidad del no-interferir.
Pocas cosas bajo el cielo son tan instructivas como las lecciones del silencio,
o tan beneficiosas como los frutos del no-interferir.
Pocos en el mundo llegan a comprenderlo."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Capítulo 43

 

 

"La más blanda de todas las cosas supera la más rígida de todas ellas.
Sólo la Nada penetra en donde no hay espacio.
Por esto conozco las ventajas de No-Hacer.
Pocas cosas bajo el cielo son tan instructivas como las lecciones del Silencio,
o tan beneficiosas como los frutos del No-Hacer."
-  Translated into English by John C. H. Wu, Spanish version by Alfonso Colodrón, 2007, Capítulo 43 

 

 

"El agua, siempre fluida,
erosiona la roca más resistente.
Si bien lo que es insustancial
penetra en el bloque más densa.
Sin preámbulos,
la no-acción demuestra lo que puede hacer.
Sabiduría sin palabras,
obras sin hacer
se realizan por muy pocos ".
-
Traducido al Inglés por Douglas Allchin, 2002, Capítulo 43

 

 

"Lo más débil del mundo,
cabalga sobre lo más fuerte que en el mundo hay.
El no-ser penetra en donde existe el menor vacío.
De ahí conozco yo las ventajas de la no-acción (wu wei).
La enseñanza sin palabras,
las ventajas de la no-acción,
nada en el mundo se les puede comparar."
 -  Translated by Juan Ignacio Preciado, 1978, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 43

 

 

"Lo más flexible en el mundo
Galopa y se despliega libremente.
Lo más sólido en el mundo,
Aún sin resquicios, puede ser penetrado por el no ser.

Yo, por lo tanto, conozco el beneficio del no interferir,
De la enseñanza sin palabras.
El beneficio de no interferir:
Casi nada en el mundo puede comparársele."
-  Translated by Álex Ferrara, 2003, Capítulo 43

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #44

Previous Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #42

Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 43

 

Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse.  Complete versions of all 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching by many different translators in many languages: 124 English, 24 German, 14 Russian, 7 Spanish, 5 French and many other languages.  Links are organized first by languages, and then alphabetically by translators.  Formatting varies somewhat.  The original website at Onekellotus went offline in 2012; but, the extensive collection of these Tao Te Ching versions was saved for posterity by the Internet Archive Wayback Machine and available as of 9/9/2015.  This is an outstanding original collection of versions of the Daodejing─ the Best on the Internet.  Caution: copyright infringement may sometimes be an issue at this website. 


Tao Te Ching, Translations into English: Terebess Asia Online (TAO).  124 nicely formatted complete English language translations, on separate webpages, of the Daodejing.  Alphabetical index by translators.  Each webpage has all 81 chapters of the Tao Te Ching translated into English.  A useful collection!  Many reformatted and colored versions from the original collection at Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse.  Caution: copyright infringement may sometimes be an issue at this website. 


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Tao Te Ching  Translated by D. C. Lau.  Addison Wesley, Reprint Edition, 2000.  192 pages.  ISBN: 978-0140441314. 

 

 

                                                           

 

 

The Taoism Reader  By Thomas Cleary.  Shambhala, 2012.  192 pages.


Change Your Thoughts - Change Your Life: Living the Wisdom of the Tao  By Wayne W. Dyer.  Hay House, Reprint Edition, 2009.  416 pages. 


The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons.  By Deng Ming-Dao.  New York, Harper Collins, 2013.  429 pages.  


The Classic of the Way and Virtue: A New Translation of the Tao-te Ching of Laozi as Interpreted by Wang Bi.  Translated by Richard John Lynn.  Translations from the Asian Classics Series.  New York, Columbia University Press, 1999.  Extensive index, glossaries, notes, 244 pages. 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Translators Index, Tao Te Ching Versions in English, Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions of the Chapters 


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español, Translators Index 


Concordance to the Daodejing


The Tao of Zen.  By Ray Grigg.  Tuttle, 2012, 256 pages.  Argues for the view that Zen is best characterized as a version of philosophical Taoism (i.e., Laozi and Zhuangzi) and not Mahayana Buddhism. 


Chapter 1 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6   Valley Spirit Center in Red Bluff, California.   Sacred Circle in the Gushen Grove. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Mind-Body Arts, Philosophy, Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2015. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

This webpage was last modified or updated on October 4, 2015.  
 
This webpage was first distributed online on April 24, 2011. 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0


 

 

Michael P. Garofalo's E-mail

Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, California

Study Chi Kung or Tai Chi or Philosophy with Mike Garofalo 

 

 


 


Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides
 

Cloud Hands Blog


Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

Bodymind Theory and Practices, Somaesthetics

The Five Senses

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons

Grandmaster Chang San Feng

Virtues

Qigong (Chi Kung) Health Practices

One Old Daoist Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

Comments, Feedback, Kudos, Suggestions

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles (1892) and Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanizations

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

 

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