Chapter 60

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

Chapter 59     Chapter 61     Index to All the Chapters     Taoism     Cloud Hands Blog

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Chapter 60

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Ruling, Governing or Rule (chih), State or Nation or Country (kuo), Cook or Fry (p'êng), Small (hsiao), Fish (hsien), Demons or Evil Spirits or Ghosts (kuei), Emotions, Power or Potency (shên), Maintaining the Throne, Way (tao or dao), Harm or Injure (shang), Wise Ruler, Keep Your Perspective, Not Harming, Power, Tranquility, Weakening Evil, People (jên), Unharmed, Harmony, Return or Restore (kuei), Manifesting Virtue, United or Combined (chiao), Sage or Holy Man (shêng jên), Realizing Te (Virtue),  居位

 

Términos en Español:  Sentencia, Gobierno, Cocina, Pescado, Emociones, Fantasmas, Espíritus Malignos, Sabio Gobernante, Sin Dañar, Poder, Tranquilidad, Ileso, Armonía, Manifestando Virtud, Sabio, Virtud, Nación, País, Pequeño, Pez, Camino, Cocinero, Demonios, Daño, Sage, Wise, Estados, Combinada, Retorno, Sabio, Restaurar. 

 
 

 

 

"Whether governing a big country or cooking a little fish, follow Nature's way and no evil tendencies will get control.
This does not mean that the dangers of evils can be eliminated entirely, but only that they will cease to harm men.
When ordinary men are unharmed, their leaders are unharmed.
And when nobody harms anybody, perfect harmony prevails."
-  Translated by Archie J. Bahm, Chapter 60 

 

 

"Ruling a large country is like cooking a small fish.
When the empire is ruled in accord with Tao,
The evil spirits will lose their power.
Not that the evil spirits will lose their powers entirely,
But they will not do any harm to anyone.
Not only do the evil spirits do no harm,
Neither does the Sage.
Since neither these two powers do any harm to the people,
Virtue is accumulated as they unite in their effect."
-  Translated by Keith Seddon, Chapter 60  

 

 

"To govern a large State is as easy as frying small fishes.
When one rules an Empire according to Truth, the spirits become powerless.
Not only the spirits, but also the gods are powerless to do harm to men.
Not only the gods, but also the Sages are powerless to do harm to men.
When these do not do harm to one another, their inherent qualities will enable them to arrive at a common end."
-  Translated by Cheng Lin, Chapter 60

 

 

"Governing a great state,
Is like cooking small fish.
If you rule the world by Tao,
The ghosts (kuei) will lose their spiritual (shen) power.
Not that the ghosts lose their spiritual power,
But their spiritual power will not harm the people.
Not that their spiritual power will not harm the people,
But neither does the sage harm the people.
Since both are harmless,
Te flows back and forth without impediment."
-  Translated by Ellen M. Chen, Chapter 60 

 

 

"Ruling a big country is like cooking a small fish.
If Tao is employed to rule the empire,
Spiritual beings will lose their supernatural power.
Not that they lose their spiritual power,
But their spiritual power can no longer harm people.
Not only will their supernatural power not harm people,
But the sage also will not harm people.
When both do not harm each other,
Virtue will be accumulated in both for the benefit of the people."
-  Translated by Wing-Tsit Chan, 1963, Chapter 60 

 

 

"Managing a big country is like cooking small fish.
The more you stir them, the less their shape can be maintained.
When one applies the subtle Way of the universe to the world,
all high spirits unite and harmonize their potencies.
Thus, they do not harm people.
All the world's leaders know to merge with the great Oneness,
thus all people are preserved from harm.
When the subtle Way of the universe is all pervading,
there is no longer any distinction between subject and object,
between spiritual and material,
between holy and unholy.
All energies merge into harmonious Oneness."
-  Translated by Hua-Ching Ni, 1995, Chapter 60

 

 

"Govern a large country in the same way you would cook a small fish; you must be delicate.
Let the spirit of the Tao govern the land, and evil spirits will have no power.
Not that the evil spirits will depart, but the effects they have on the people will be insignificant,
and the effects of the Sage on the people will also not be burdensome.
Since the spirits and the Sage do not cause harm, all will be in balance."
-  Translated by Rivenrock, Chapter 60 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"Ruling a large state is like cooking a small fish.
When you use the Way to govern the world,
Evil spirits will not have godlike power,
It is that their power will not harm men.
But it is not only that their powers will not harm men,
The sage also, will not harm them.
Since these two do not do not harm others,
Therefore their Virtues intermingle and returns to them."
-  Translated by Bram den Hond, Chapter 60

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

  

 

"To govern a great state, one should act like someone cooking a very small fish
very delicately, otherwise they break up.
When a state is governed according to the Principle,
phantoms do not appear there to harm the people,
because the Sage who governs does not harm the people.
Not that the spirits have no more powers,
But their powers will not harm men.
Neither will they harm men,
Nor will the Sage harm the people.
The merit of this double tranquility on the part of the living
and the dead comes back, therefore, to the Sage."
-  Translated by Derek Bryce, Chapter 60

 

 

"Governing a big country is like cooking small fish:
Too much stirring will spoil the whole dish.
If the ruler governs the country by the Way,
The evil souls will not work against the society.
It is not that evil souls will have lost their influence,
But that their influence can do no harm to the living.
When evil souls can exert no bad influence from below,
Nor rulers harm people from above,
Then the Way will have extended far enough
To bring all the living back to their nature."
-  Translated by Liu Qixuan, Chapter 60

 

 

"Rule a great state as you cook a small fish.
Through the Way take a ruler’s place in the world,
And the ghosts of the dead shall have no force.
Is it that they have no force?
Or that their force can do no harm?
That their force can do no harm?
Or that the wise lord does no harm?
Nor ghosts nor wise lords doing harm
To their joint virtue thus rebounds."
-  Translated by Moss Roberts, 2001, Chapter 60

 

 

"Rule a big country
The way you'd cook a small fish.
If Tao is used to govern the world
Evil spirits have no power.
Their power is not gone
But it does not harm the people.
Their power does not harm the people
And it does not harm the sage.
As they suffer no harm
Their virtues unite and return to them."
-  Translated by Agnieszka Solska, 2005, Chapter 60 

 

 

"Ruling a large state resembles frying a small fish
It is inappropriate to turn it over frequently.
When the Tao prevails in the world,
Even ghosts and spirits become harmless.
It is not that ghosts become harmless
But that their potencies can no longer harm people.
Not only ghosts become harmless,
Sages harm no people either.
Hence neither does any harm to the people
And both sages and ghosts help the people to enjoy the benefit of virtue."
-  Translated by Gu Zhengkun, Chapter 60 

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"Governing a large country
is like frying small fish.
Too much poking spoils the meat.

When the Tao is used to govern the world
then evil will lose its power to harm the people.
Not that evil will no longer exist,
but only because it has lost its power.
Just as evil can lose its ability to harm,
the Master shuns the use of violence.

If you give evil nothing to oppose,
then virtue will return by itself."
-  Translated by J. H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 60 

 

 

 

A Chinese Language Version of Chapter 60 of the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
A note on my style of displaying the Chinese characters of the Tao Te Ching

 

 

治大國若烹小鮮. 
以道蒞天下, 其鬼不神.
非其鬼不神.
其神不傷人.
非其神不傷人.
聖人亦不傷人. 
夫兩不相傷.
故德交歸焉. 
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 60 

 

 

chih ta kuo jo p'êng hsiao hsien.
yi tao li t'ien hsia, ch'i kuei pu shên.
fei ch'i kuei pu shên.
ch'i shên pu shang jên.
fei ch'i shên pu shang jên.
shêng jên yi pu shang jên
fu liang pu hsiang shang.
ku tê chiao kuei yen.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 60 

 


Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 60 of the Tao Te Ching

 


zhi da guo ruo peng xiao xian.
yi dao li tian xia, qi gui bu shen.
fei qi gui bu shen.
qi shen bu shang ren.
fei qi shen bu shang ren.
sheng ren yi bu shang ren.
fu liang bu xiang shang.
gu de jiao gui yan.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 60 

 
 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Google Translator

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"Nurturing your love
is like tending a small garden.
If you keep pulling up the plants
to see if the roots are growing
you will harvest nothing.
If you focus on your troubles
you give them added power.
Step aside as would a martial arts master.
The troubles still exist,
but you are not unbalanced by their blows.
They lose their power to disturb.
They become food for growth."
-  Translated by William Martin, Chapter 60 

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons


                             

 

 

 

"Ruling a large country is like cooking a small fish.
When the world is ruled by Tao, spirits do not haunt.
It is not that Spirits are no longer numinous, but that their powers do not harm men.
It is not just that their powers do not harm men, the Sage also does not harm men.
If neither side harms the other, Te spreads throughout."
-  Translated by Tam Gibbs, Chapter 60 

 

 

"Ruling a big kingdom is like cooking a small fish.
When a man of Tao reigns over the world, demons have no spiritual powers.
Not that the demons have no spiritual powers, but the spirits themselves do no harm to men.
Not that the spirits do no harm to men, but the Sage himself does no harm to his people.
If only the ruler and his people would refrain from harming each other, all the benefits of life would accumulate in the kingdom."
-  Translated by John C. H. Wu, 1961, Chapter 60 

 

 

"Govern a great state as you would cook a small fish (do it gently).
Let Tao reign over the world, and no spirits will show their ghostly powers.
Not that the spirits have no more powers,
But their powers will not harm men.
Nor will the Sage harm the people.
Inasmuch as none of them harms anybody,
Therefore virtue belongs to them both."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 60 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"Govern a big country as you would fry a small fish.
Approach the world with the Tao and evil will have no power.
Not that evil has no power, but it will not harm people.
Not that evil is not harmful,
But the Sage is dedicated to not harming people-even evil people.
When no one hurts another,
All will eventually return to the good."
-  Translated by John R. Mabry, Chapter 60 

 

 

"Properly ruling a big kingdom is like cooking a small fish.
If one oversees all under heaven in partnership with Thou, 'monsters' do not exist.
Not only that, but their existence could not harm anyone!
Not only could they not harm anyone, but the ruling Sage does them no harm either.
Now, when neither scorches the other, merit in nourished in both: and the fish is done!"
-  Translated by Jerry C. Welch, 1998, Chapter 60  

 

 

"Rule a big country as you would fry small fish.
Who rules the world in accord with Tao
Shall find that the spirits lose their power.
It is not that the spirits lose their power,
But that they cease to do people harm.
It is not that they cease to do people harm,
The Sage also does no harm to the people.
When both do not do each other harm,
The original character is restored."
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1955, Chapter 60 

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"Ruling a large kingdom is indeed like cooking small fish.
They who by Tao all that is under heaven
Did not let an evil spirit within them display its powers.
Nay, it was not only that the evil spirit did not display its powers;
Neither was the Sage's good spirit used to the hurt of other men.
Nor was it only that his good spirit was not used to harm other men,
The Sage himself was thus saved from harm.
And so, each being saved from harm,
Their “powers” could converge towards a common end."
-  Translated by Arthur Waley, 1934, Chapter 60  

 

 

"Governing a big kingdom is like cooking small seafood.
With Tao as guidance, evils will never have their way.
It is actually not that the evils do not have their way, but that the evils will not hurt people.
Not only do Evils not hurt people, but also do not hurt the sage.
When both people and the sage are not hurt, Te is in dominance."
-  Translated by Thomas Z. Zhang, Chapter 60 

 

 

"Govern the nation as you would fry a small fish
When Tao is present in the empire dark spirits lose their power
It not that they have no power it that their power can harm anyone
When Tao is present the people enjoy the blessing of Heaven
They find unity
They find peace
What this about spirits doing harm?
The Sage is approaching and they are rushing in to sweep his path!"
-  Translated by Jonathan Star, 2001, Chapter 60 

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

 

                                     

 

 

 

"Govern a Great State
As you would cook a small fish, do it gently.
When Tao is manifest in the world
Evil spirits have no power.
When evil spirits have no power
They cannot hurt men.
Evil spirits cannot hurt men.
The self-controlled man does not hurt men.
The Master also does not hurt men.
Therefore they unite in manifesting Teh."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 60 

 

 

"Rule and govern All Things with gentleness,
In harmony with the Tao.
Thus does the power of evil spirits remain unfulfilled
Neither does the good spirit of the Sage cause harm
The Sage himself, being likewise protected,
Unity and perfect harmony prevail for all."
-  Translated by Alan B. Taplow, 1982, Chapter 60

 

 

"Ruling a great state is like cooking a small fish.
If one governs All-under-heaven according to the Way, the manes of the dead will not manifest themselves as spirits.
It is not that these manes are not spirits, but these spirits will not harm men.
Just as the spirits will not harm men, the Saint will not harm the people.
If indeed these two do not harm one another, their Virtue will converge towards a common end."
-  Translated by Jan L. Duyvendak, 1954, Chapter 60 

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   Translated by Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"Rule a great state in the way one would fry little fish,

Without gutting or scraping, consider the good of the whole,

Let the empire be ruled in accord with the rule of the Tao

And the spirits of those who are gone will not seek to control.

 

Not only not seek, but spirits will harm not the people,

Not only not harm, but, because of the rule of the sage,

Who harms not, these twain, not seeking to injure each other,

Will therefore in virtue together unite and engage."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 60

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

 

 

"One should govern a great state as one fries small fish.
With Tao one may successfully rule the Empire.
Ghosts will not frighten, gods will not harm, neither will wise men mislead the people.
Since nothing frightens or harms the people, teh will abide."
-  Translated by Dwight Goddard and Henri Borel, 1919, Chapter 60 

 

 

"Sorgfalt und Lebensgehorsam in der Staatsführung
So sorgfältig wie man kleine Fische brät,
muß man ein großes Reich regieren.
Wenn ein Reich
im Geist des Unergründlichen regiert wird,
dann spuken keine finsteren Gewalten.

Nicht nur spuken keine finsteren Gewalten,
es geistern auch keine Unsichtbaren.
Nicht daß beide nicht mehr vorhanden wären,
sondern sie können nicht mehr störend wirksam werden -
so wenig, wie je ein Weyser störend wirksam sein kann.

Wenn die finsteren Gewalten und die unsichtbaren Geister
nicht mehr wirksam werden können,
dann können sich die besten Kräfte im Menschen entfalten."
-  Translated by Rudolf Backofen, 1949, Chapter 60 

 

 

"Ein großes Land muß man leiten,
wie man kleine Fischlein brät.
Wenn man die Welt verwaltet nach dem sinn,
dann gehen die Abgeschiedenen nicht als Geister um.
Nicht, daß die Abgeschiedenen keine Geister wären,
doch ihre Geister schaden den Menschen nicht.

Nicht nur die Geister schaden den Menschen nicht:
auch der Berufene schadet ihnen nicht.
Wenn nun diese beiden Mächte einander nicht verletzen,
so vereinigen sich ihre Lebenskrafte in ihrer Wirkung."
-  Translated by Richard Wilhelm, 1911, Chapter 60

 

 

"To rule a large nation is as to cook a small fish.
In a world with Tao prevailing,
Ghosts will not become goblins.
Not that ghosts will not become goblins,
But God will not hurt the people;
Not that God will not hurt the people,
But the Sage will not hurt them either.
When both will not hurt each other,
All virtue will converge to them."
-  Translated by Paul J. Lin, Chapter 60 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"The state should be governed as we cook small fish, without much business.
Bringing the Tao to the governing of the Kingdom will give rest to the shades of the dead.
Not that the Spirits will be inactive, but they will cease to trouble the people.
But what is of more importance, the wise ruler of the people will not hurt them.
And in so far as they do not interfere with one another, their influences conspire to the general good!"
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 60

 

 

"Governing a large state is like boiling a small fish.
When the empire is ruled in accordance with the way,
The spirits lose their potencies.
Or rather, it is not that they lose their potencies,
But that, though they have their potencies, they do not harm the people.
It is not only they who, having their potencies, do not harm the people,
The sage, also, does not harm the people.
As neither does any harm, each attributes the merit to the other."
-  Translated by D. C. Lau, 1963, Chapter 60 

 

 

"To rule a big country should be so simple like cooking small fish.
When the world rule is approaching Dao:
The Ghost and Spirit will not necessarily be divine.
It is not that the Ghost and Spirit will not necessarily be divine but the divine will not be utilized to threaten people with harm.
Not only the divine should not threaten people with harm, the Sage ruler should not threaten people with harm either.
When those two (state and religion) do no harm to each other, both will achieve the same goal - Return to Nature."
-  Translated by Tang Zi-Chang, Chapter 60 

 

 

"Pour gouverner un grand royaume, on doit imiter celui qui fait cuire un petit poisson.
Lorsque le prince dirige l'empire par le Tao, les démons ne montrent point leur puissance.
Ce n'est point que les démons manquent de puissance, c'est que les démons ne blessent point les hommes.
Ce n'est point que les démons ne puissent blesser les hommes, c'est que le Saint lui-même ne blesse point les hommes.
Ni le Saint ni les démons ne les blessent; c'est pourquoi il confondent ensemble leur vertu."
-  Translated by Stanislas Julien, 1842, Chapter 60

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

 

"Se debe gobernar un gran Estado
tal como se fríen los pececillos, con cuidado
para que no se desentrañen.
Si se gobernara el mundo con el Tao,
el mal no tendría poder.
No porque el mal careciera de poder,
sino porque éste no dañaría a los hombres.
El mal no dañaría a los hombres,
y tampoco el sabio los dañaría.
Si no se atacaran mutuamente, unirían sus Energías
y así ambos aumentarían su Poder."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 60

 

 

"Gobernar un gran Estado es como freír pececillos pequeños con cuidado para no desmenuzarlos.
Si se gobierna al mundo con Tao, los manes de los difuntos no seharán espíritus.
No sólo los manes no se haránespíritus, sino que los mismos espíritus no dañarána los hombres.
Los espíritus no dañarán a los hombres y los hombres perfectos tampoco los dañarán.
Como ambos no se perjudican mutuamente, sus virtudes se entrelazan."
-  Translated by Carmelo Elorduy, 2006, Capítulo 60  

 

 

"Se gobierna un gran Estado
con el cuidado conque se fríen los pececillos.
Si se gobierna el mundocon Tao,
los manes de los muertos no usarán su poder.
No porque los manes no se hagan espíritus,
sino porque éstos no dañarán a los hombres.
Los espíritus no dañarán a los hombres,
y tampoco el sabio los daña.
Si no se perjudican mutuamente,
la virtud reúne a ambos."
-  Spanish Version Online at RatMachines, Capítulo 60 

 

 

"Gobernar un gran reino es como cocinar un pescado pequeño.
Cuandose gobierna el mundo conforme al Tao,
los demonios carecen de poderes espirituales.
No sólo los demonios carecen de poderes espirituales,
sino que losespíritus mismos no pueden dañar a la gente.
No sólolos espíritus no pueden dañas a la gente,
sino que el Sabiomismo no daña a su pueblo.
Si tan sólo el gobernante y sussúbditos se reprimieran de dañarse mutuamente,
se acumularíanen el reino todos los beneficios de la vida."
-  Translated into Spanish by Alfonso Colodrón from the English translation by John C. H. Wu, 1993, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 60 

 

 

"Si quieres gobernar un gran reino, haz como aquel que fríe pescaditos.
Si tú gobiernas el mundo de acuerdo con el Tao, nunca las almas de los muertos se volverán espectros.
No porque los muertos no posean este poder, sino porque su espíritu no daña a los hombres.
Si los espíritus no hacen daño a los hombres, es porque el sabio no los daña.
Si los hombres no se ofenden mutuamente, la virtud de la villa se intensificará en el reino"
Translation from Logia Medio Dia, 2015, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 60

 

 

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Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 60

 

Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse.  Complete versions of all 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching by many different translators in many languages: 124 English, 24 German, 14 Russian, 7 Spanish, 5 French and many other languages.  Links are organized first by languages, and then alphabetically by translators.  Formatting varies somewhat.  The original website at Onekellotus went offline in 2012; but, the extensive collection of these Tao Te Ching versions was saved for posterity by the Internet Archive Wayback Machine and available as of 9/9/2015.  This is an outstanding original collection of versions of the Daodejing─ the Best on the Internet.  Caution: copyright infringement may sometimes be an issue at this website. 


Tao Te Ching, Translations into English: Terebess Asia Online (TAO).  124 nicely formatted complete English language translations, on separate webpages, of the Daodejing.  Alphabetical index by translators.  Each webpage has all 81 chapters of the Tao Te Ching translated into English.  A useful collection!  Many reformatted and colored versions from the original collection at Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse.  Caution: copyright infringement may sometimes be an issue at this website. 


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Tao Te Ching  Translated by D. C. Lau.  Addison Wesley, Reprint Edition, 2000.  192 pages.  ISBN: 978-0140441314. 

 

 

                                                           

 

 

The Taoism Reader  By Thomas Cleary.  Shambhala, 2012.  192 pages.


Change Your Thoughts - Change Your Life: Living the Wisdom of the Tao  By Wayne W. Dyer.  Hay House, Reprint Edition, 2009.  416 pages. 


The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons.  By Deng Ming-Dao.  New York, Harper Collins, 2013.  429 pages.  


The Classic of the Way and Virtue: A New Translation of the Tao-te Ching of Laozi as Interpreted by Wang Bi.  Translated by Richard John Lynn.  Translations from the Asian Classics Series.  Columbia University Press, 2004.  256 pages. 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Translators Index, Tao Te Ching Versions in English, Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions of the Chapters 


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español, Translators Index 


Concordance to the Daodejing


The Tao of Zen.  By Ray Grigg.  Tuttle, 2012, 256 pages.  Argues for the view that Zen is best characterized as a version of philosophical Taoism (i.e., Laozi and Zhuangzi) and not Mahayana Buddhism. 


Chapter 1 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6   Valley Spirit Center in Red Bluff, California.   Sacred Circle in the Gushen Grove. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Mind-Body Arts, Philosophy, Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2015. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

This webpage was last modified or updated on September 22, 2015. 

This webpage was first distributed online on June 30, 2011. 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0


 

 

Michael P. Garofalo's E-mail

Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, California

Study Yoga or Chi Kung or Tai Chi with Mike Garofalo
 

 

 

 


Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides
 

Cloud Hands Blog


Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

Bodymind Theory and Practices, Somaesthetics

The Five Senses

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons

Grandmaster Chang San Feng

Virtues

Qigong (Chi Kung) Health Practices

One Old Daoist Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

Comments, Feedback, Kudos

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles (1892) and Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanizations

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

 

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