Chapter 48

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

Chapter 47     Chapter 49     Index to All the Chapters     Taoism     Cloud Hands Blog

English     Chinese     Spanish

 

 

 

Chapter 48

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Seek or Pursue (wei), Simplifying, Daily (jih), Releasing, Gain or Acquire (yi), Action (wei), Non-Action or Not-Acting (Wu Wei), Reach or Attain (chih), Forgetting, Restraint, Grabbing, Reduce or Decrease or Lose (sun), Letting Go, Distress, Without or Void (wu), Meddling, Win or Capture (ch'ü), Effort, Relax, Accomplishment, Adding, Subtracting, Below Heaven or Earth (t'ien hsia), Tao, Interfering, Forever or Eternal (ch'ang), Learning or Knowledge (hsüeh), Changing, Interfering or Meddling (shih), The Way, Natural, Enough or Sufficient (tsu), Sage, Activity, Dao, Non-Interference, Striving,  忘知

Términos en Español:  Simplificando, Liberar, Acción, Olvido, Restricción, Agarrar, Reducir, Seguir Adelante, Angustia, Entrometido, Esfuerzo, Realización, Relajarse, Sumar, Restar, Interferir, Aprender, Cambio, Camino, Natural, Sabio, Actividad, Luchar, Buscad, Perseguir, Conocimiento, Diario, Ganancia, Adquirir, Reducir, Disminuir, Alcance, Alcanzar, Sin, Vacío, Victorias, Captura, Tierra, Perder, Para Siempre, Eterno, Interferir, Suficiente, Perder. 

 

 

 

"Act academic, daily gain
Act tao, daily lose.
Losing, again lose
It happens, reaching relating to the absence of acting
Absence of acting yet absence of being without acting.
Grabbing the world, an entire absence of effort happens
Liking entirely the presence of effort
Is insufficient to precede grabbing the world."
-  Translated by David Lindauer, Chapter 48 

 

 

"The student of knowledge acquires day by day.
The student of Tao loses day by day.
Less and less, until nothing is done.
Do nothing, and everything is done.
The world is ruled by letting things take their course.
It cannot be ruled by interfering."
-  Translated by Ned Ludd, Chapter 48

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"In the pursuit of learning, every day something is added.
In the pursuit of the Tao, every day something is dropped.
Less and less is done until you come to action with striving.
When you follow this practice, nothing remains undone.
All under heaven is won by letting things take their course.
Nothing can be gained by interfering."
-  Translated by Tolbert McCarroll, Chapter 48  

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"The follower of knowledge learns as much as he can every day;
The follower of the Way forgets as much as he can every day.
By attrition he reaches a state of inaction
Wherein he does nothing, but nothing remains undone.
To conquer the world, accomplish nothing;
If you must accomplish something,
The world remains beyond conquest."   
-  Translation by Peter A. Merel, Chapter 48  

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"One who seeks knowledge learns something new every day.
One who seeks the Tao unlearns something new every day.
Less and less remains until you arrive at non-action.
When you arrive at non-action,
nothing will be left undone.
Mastery of the world is achieved
by letting things take their natural course.
You can not master the world by changing the natural way."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, Chapter 48

 

 

為學日益.
為道日損. 
損之又損.
以至於無為. 
無為而無不為. 
取天下常以無事.
及其有事, 不足以取天下. 
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 48  

 

 

wei hsüeh jih yi.
wei tao jih sun.
sun chih yu sun. 
yi chih yü wu wei.
wu wei erh wu pu wei.
ch'ü t'ien hsia ch'ang yi wu shih.
ch'i chi yu shih, pu tsu yi ch'ü t'ien hsia.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 48 

 


Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 48 of the Tao Te Ching

 


wei xue ri yi. 
wei dao ri sun. 
sun zhi you sun. 
yi zhi yu wu wei.
wu wei er wu bu wei.
qu tian xia chang yi wu shi.
ji qi you shi, bu zu yi qu tian xia.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 48

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"He who pursues learning will increase every day;
He who pursues Tao will decrease every day.
He will decrease and continue to decrease,
Till he comes to non-action;
By non-action everything can be done."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 48 

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons


                             

 

 

 

"In pursuit of knowledge, every day something is added.
In the practice of the Tao, every day something is dropped.
Less and less do you need to force things, until finally you arrive at non-action.
When nothing is done, nothing is left undone.
True mastery can be gained by letting things go their own way.
It can't be gained by interfering."
-  Translation by Stephen Mitchell, Chapter 48  

 

 

"A man anxious for knowledge adds more to himself every minute;
A man acquiring life loses himself in it,
Has less and less to bear in mind,
Less and less to do,
Because life, he finds, is well inclined,
Including himself too.
Often a man sways the world like a wind
But not by deed;
And if there appear to you to be need
Of motion to sway it, it has left you behind."
-  Translation by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 48 

 

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Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"One who engages in study is daily increased.
One who engages in the Dao is daily diminished.
Diminish and once again diminish until there is no activity.
When there is no activity there is nothing that will not be done.
One always takes the world by means of not meddling.
When one meddles then one is inadequate to take the world."
-  Translated by Patrick E. Moran, Chapter 48 

 

 

"Learning consists in adding to one's stock day by day;
The practice of Tao consists in “subtracting day by day,
Subtracting and yet again subtracting
Till one has reached inactivity.
But by this very inactivity
Everything can be activated.”
Those who of old won the adherence of all who live under heaven
All did so not interfering.
Had they interfered,
They would never have won this adherence."
-  Translated by Arthur Waley, 1934, Chapter 48

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"When pursuing knowledge, something new is acquired each day.
But when pursuing the way of the Tao, something is subtracted;
less striving occurs, until there is no striving.
When effort is uncontrived, nothing is left undone;
the way of nature rules by allowing things to take their course,
not by contriving to change."
-  Translated by Stan Rosenthal, Chapter 48  

 

 

"While day by day the overzealous student stores up facts for future use,
He who has learned to trust nature finds need for ever fewer external directions.
He will discard formula after formula, until he reaches the conclusion:
Let Nature take its course.
By letting each thing act in accordance with its own nature,
Everything that needs to be done gets done.
The best way to manage anything is by making use of its own nature;
For a thing cannot function properly when its own nature has been disrupted."
-  Translated by Archie J. Bahm, 1958, Chapter 48 

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

 

                                     

 

 

 

"By activity in learning we are daily enriched.
By activity of Tao we are daily diminished, diminished and yet more diminished,
until we arrive at activity of Inner Life, and activity of Inner Life becomes stillness of Inner Life.
By the practice of Inner Life stillness we can continually conquer all things.
By the practice of returning to possessions, nothing that we conquer will be sufficient for us."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 48 

 

 

"The scholar seeketh daily increase of knowing;
The sage of Tao daily decrease of doing.
He decreaseth it, again and again, until he doth no act with the lust of result.
Having attained this Inertia all accomplisheth itself.
He who attracteth to himself all that is under Heaven doth so without effort.
He who maketh effort is not able to attract it."
-  Translated by Aleister Crowley, 1918, Chapter 48 

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   By Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"In pursuing the study of Tao there will be daily increase; in acting out the Tao when learned, there will be daily diminution.
This marks the characteristics of the two stages.
In the first the man appears to make rapid progress in learning and philosophy, and so cuts a figure before the world; in the second, he becomes simple, humble, self-effacing, and thus may be said to diminish.
When this diminution is still further diminished, he will arrive at a state of inaction, or quiescence.
There is nothing that cannot be done by inaction. 
The Sage ever employs inaction in administering the Empire.
As for those who put themselves to trouble in the matter, they are inadequate to the task of government."
-  Translated by Frederic Henry Balfour, 1884, Chapter 48 

 

 

"By studying, every day one increases (useless and injurious particular notions, in one's memory);
By concentrating on the Principle, they are diminished every day.
Pushed to the limit, this diminution ends in non-action, (the consequence of the absence of particular ideas).
Now there is nothing that non-action (letting things go) cannot sort out.
It is through non-action that one wins the empire.
To act, in order to win it, results in failure."
-  Translated by Derek Bryce, 1999, Chapter 48 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"Bodily and mental distress is increased every day in the effort to get knowledge.
But this distress is daily diminished by the getting of Tao.
Do you continually curtail your effort till there be nothing left of it?
By non-action there is nothing which cannot be effected.
A man might, without the least distress, undertake the government of the world.
But those who distress themselves about governing the world are not fit for it."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 48 

 

 

"Striving for learning one gains a daily addition,

Using the Tao there follows a daily remission,

And as the work lessens and lessens there comes a condition

Of nothing doing, when nothing is left to do.

He who would take as his own all the realm under heaven,

Accomplishes it when no trouble is taken or given,

If trouble he use, by trouble itself he is driven,

And unfitted thereby to take what he seeks to pursue."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 48   

 

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

"Al buscar conocimiento mediante el estudio,
cada día se adquiere algo.
Al buscar conocimiento mediante el Tao,
cada día hay que desprenderse de algo.
Desprendiendose de cada vez más
se llega al estado de la No-Interferencia.
Al No-Interferir
nada se deja sin hacer.
El mundo debe regirse dejando que las cosas fluyan.
Nada puede ser regido interfiriendo contra las cosas."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Capitulo 48

 

 

"El que persigue el conocimiento, adquiere tanto como puede cada día;
El que persigue al Tao, pierde tanto como puede cada día.
Alcanza un estado de inacción
Tal que sin hacer nada, nada queda sin hacer."
-  Translated by Antonio Rivas Gonzálvez, 1998, Capitulo 48


 

 

 

 

 

 

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Previous Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #47

Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 


 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 48

 

Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español


Concordance to the Daodejing 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) and Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version.  From the Dao is Open website. 


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 48 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 48, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2015. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

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This webpage was last modified or updated on November 15, 2014. 
This webpage was first distributed online on April 29, 2011. 
 

 

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Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

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Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides

Cloud Hands Blog

Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

One Old Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

Comments, Feedback, Kudos, Suggestions

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles (1892) and Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanizations

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81