Chapter 59

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

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Chapter 59

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles Romanization) Terms:  Guarding the Tao, Government (chih), Knowing Limits, People (jên), Heaven or Divine (t'ien), Restraint, Nothing (mo), Better or Surpass (jo), Frugality or Moderation (), truly (fu), Call or Means (wei), Longevity, Early and Morning (tsao), Building, Leadership, Atate or Nation (kuo), Recover or Acquire (fu), Heavy (chung), Accumulate (chi), Virtue or Power (), Know (chih), Mother or Matrix (mu), Growth, Roots, Storing, Follow Reason, Virtues, Mother of the Kingdom, No Limitations, Limit or Extreme (chi), Integrity, Overcoming or Subdue (k'o), Tao, Lasting or Enduring (chiu), Deep or Abrtruse (shên), Stores, Saving, Storage, Way or Path (dao or tao), Sturdy or Firm (ku), Roots (kên), Tree, Trunk or Stem (ti), Life or Immortality (shêng), Wisdom, Insight or Vision (shih), Peace, Foresight, Teh, Master,  守道    

 

Términos en Español:  Vigilando el Tao, Gobierno, Conocer Límites, Restricción, Longevidad, Construcción, Liderazgo, Nación, Madre, Crecimiento, Raíz, Origen, Almacenar, Siga la Razón, Frugalidad, Virtud, Madre del Reino, Ningunas Limitaciones, Integridad, Superación, Duradera, Tiendas, Ahorro, Almacenamiento, Moderación, Árbor, Tronco, Sabiduría, Paz, Maestro, Mantenerse en el Tao, Gente, Cielo, Divino, Naturaleza, Mejor, Superar, Verdad, Frugalidad, Llamada, Medios, Temprano, Mañana, Recuperar, Adquirir, Pesado, Acumular, Camino, Someter, Poder, Saber, Límite, Detalle, Estado, Matriz, Duradera, Profundo, Raiz, Robusta, Firme, Tallo, Vida, Inmortalidad, Visión, Perspeiacia. 

 

 

 

 

"In governing people
No one compares efforts of the heavens to restraint.
In the end only restraint is appropriately called quickly resolving
What is called quickly resolving has heavy accumulation of ideal.
Following heavy accumulation of ideal
Comes absence of lacking conquering
Following absence of lacking conquering
No one knows limits
When no one knows limits
Presence of a nation can happen.
In the presence of the mother of a nation
Growth and longevity may happen.
Appropriately called
Deep roots, firm stalks, growth, life, longevity, looking at tao."
-  Translated by David Lindauer, Chapter 59 

 

 

"For regulating the human in our constitution and rendering the proper service to the heavenly,
there is nothing like moderation.
It is only by this moderation that there is effected and early return to man's normal state.
That early return is what I call the repeated accumulation of the attributes of the Tao.
With that repeated accumulation of those attributes,
there comes the subjugation we know not what shall be the limit;
and when one knows not what the limit shall be, he may be the ruler of a state.
He who possesses the mother of the state may continue long.
His case is like that of the plant of which we say that its roots are deep and its flower stalks firm;
this is the way to secure that its enduring life shall long be seen."
-  Translated by Unbekannten, Chapter 59   

 

 

"To rule people and serve heaven, nothing is better than compliant.
To be compliant is to readily return to Tao.
To readily return to Tao is to hoard its virtue.
To hoard its virtue is to have nothing undone.
To have nothing undone is to have limitless strength.
To have limitless strength is to be fit to become a ruler.
The Mother of ruling is forever.
This is called the Tao of having deep and firm roots,
the long and eternal life."
-  Translated by Eiichi Shimomiss
é, 1998, Chapter 59 

 

 

"In governing a people and in serving Heaven, there is nothing like frugality.
To be frugal is to return early.
To return early is to accumulate an abundance of Virtue.
Accumulating an abundance of Virtue, everything can be overcome.
Overcoming everything, the unknown height is reached.
He who has reached an unknown height can reign a state.
He who reigns a state from its root can last long.
This is the Way of the deep root and the firm foot, of the of long life and not-getting-old."
-  Translated by Tien Cong Tran, Chapter 59

 

 

"Rule the people and serve Heaven yet hold nothing more dear than the Mother harvest
Let every thought and every breath be the fruit of your offering
Do it now
Let her power run thick in your blood
There will be no obstacle you cannot overcome
No limit you cannot surpass
No empire you cannot rule
Ah, but in all your glory never lose sight of the Mother
Without her your empire will crumble your power will waste away
For the Mother brings the harvest
She alone causes all things to endure
We call this deep roots and a solid trunk
The way of long life and lasting insight"
-  Translated by Jonathan Star, 2001, Chapter 59

 

 

"In governing people and serving heaven, there is nothing better than moderation.
To be moderate is to follow Tao without straying.
To follow Tao without straying is to become filled with good energy.
To be filled with good energy is to overcome all things.
To overcome all things is to know that all things are possible.
She who knows that all things are possible is fit to govern people.
Because she is one with the mother, her roots go deep,
her foundation stands firm, her life lasts long, her vision endures."
-  Translated by Brian Browne Walker, 1996, Chapter 59 

 

 

"In caring for others and serving heaven,
There is nothing like using restraint.
Restraint begins with giving up one's own ideas.
This depends on Virtue gathered in the past.
If there is a good store of Virtue, then nothing is impossible.
If nothing is impossible, then there are no limits.
If a man knows no limits, then he is fit to be a ruler.
The mother principle of ruling holds good for a long time.
This is called having deep roots and a firm foundation,
The Tao of long life and eternal vision."
-  Translated by Jane English, Chapter 59 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"For ruling men or serving God,
There's nothing else like stores saved up."
By "stores saved up" is meant forehandedness,
Accumulate Virtue, such that nothing
Can resist it and its limit
None can guess: such infinite resource
Allows the jurisdiction of the king;
Whose kingdom then will long endure
If it provides the Mother an abode.
Indeed it is the deeply rooted base,
The firm foundation of the Way
To immortality of self and name."
-  Translated by Raymond Blakney, Chapter 59 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"In governing the country and serving Heaven
There is nothing like frugality.
Only by being frugal can you recover quickly.
When you recover quickly you accumulate virtue.
Having accumulated virtue,
There is nothing you can't overcome.
When there is nothing you can't overcome
Who knows the limits of your capabilities?
These limits being unfathomable
You can possess the country.
The Mother who possesses the country can be long-living.
This is called "planting the roots deeply and firmly.""
-  Translated by Charles Muller, Chapter 59 

 

 

"The Way of Moderation

In leading people and serving Nature,
There is nothing better than moderation.
Since, indeed, moderation means yielding early;
Yielding early means accumulating Power.

When Power is accumulated,
Nothing is impossible.
When nothing is impossible,
One knows no limits.
One who knows no limits
Can possess the organization.

An organization that possesses the Mother
Can endure and advance.
This means deep roots and firm foundation:
Durability and longevity through observation of the Tao."
-  Translated by R. L. Wing, 1986, Chapter 59

 

 

"Establishing a reserve of vital energy, A precious Ch'i -
Heaven may be well served.
So doing -
Permits return to the essence of life,
In turn, nourishing and increasing an abundance of Te.

Now,
Overcoming all difficulty -
Gaining infinite capacity -
Being beyond all limitations -
Suitability for leading and serving nations is achieved.
Holding to the Tao, the government of nations may endure.
Having a firm foundation, Deeply rooted, abundantly strong,
The Tao of long life and durable vision is achieved."
-  Translated by Alan B. Taplow, 1982, Chapter 59

 

 

"Frugality is the best for governing people or serving heaven.
With frugality, we can be prepared in advance.
Advanced preparation is to emphasize accumulating Te.
Accumulating Te, we can accomplish any endeavor.
Accomplishing any endeavor means there is not limit.
With no limit we can have a kingdom.
With frugality as the mother of the kingdom, the kingdom can last long.
This is called deep root and firm foundation.
With such root and foundation we can enjoy longevity."
-  Translated by Thomas Z. Zhang, Chapter 59  

 

 

"For ordering the people and serving Heaven, nothing is better than husbandry.
Only husbandry can be called the quick way to submission.
By "quick way to submission" we mean the repetitive accumulation of virtue.
If one repetitively accumulates virtue, there is nothing that he cannot conquer.
As there is nothing that he cannot conquer, no one knows the limits he can reach.
As no one knows his limits, he can, accordingly, keep his state.
If one maintains the mother of the state, he can, accordingly, long endure.
This we refer to as having deep roots firmly established, for it is the Dao of long life and enduring oversight."
-  Translated by Richard John Linn, Chapter 59 

 

 

 
Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons


                             

 

 

 

"While ruling the people
And serving heaven
Build up a store.
If you've built up a store
You can adhere to Tao early.
If you've adhered to Tao early
You can amass virtue.
When you've amassed virtue
There is nothing you cannot do.
When there is nothing you cannot do
Your capacity has no bounds.
Having boundless capacity
You're ready to rule the realm.
Leaning on the mother of the realm
You can last through all time.
You've been firmly established.
You have a strong support.
This is the Tao of long life.
This is the Tao of farsightedness."
-  Translated by Agnieszka Solska, Chapter 59 

 

 

 

A Chinese Language Version of Chapter 59 of the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
A note on my style of displaying the Chinese characters of the Tao Te Ching


 

 

治人事天, 莫若嗇. 
夫唯嗇, 是謂早服.
早服謂之重積德;
重積德, 則無不克;
無不克, 則莫知其極.
莫知其極, 可以有國.
有國之母, 可以長久.
是謂深根固柢, 長生久視之道. 
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 59  

 

 

 

chih jên shih t'ien, mo jo sê.
fu wei sê, shih wei tsao fu.
tsao fu wei chih chung chi tê;
chung chi tê, tsê wu pu k'o;
wu pu k'o, tsê mo chih ch'i chi.
mo chih ch'i chi, k'o yi yu kuo.
yu kuo chih mu, k'o yi ch'ang chiu.
shih wei shên kên ku ti, ch'ang shêng chiu shih chih tao.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 59 

 


Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 59 of the Tao Te Ching

 


zhi ren shi tian, mo ruo se.
fu wei se, shi wei zao fu.
zao fu wei zhi zhong ji de; 
zhong ji de, ze wu bu ke; 
wu bu ke, ze mo zhi qi ji.
mo zhi qi ji, ke yi you guo.
you guo zhi mu, ke yi chang jiu.
shi wei shen gen gu di, chang sheng jiu shi zhi dao.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 59 

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Google Translator

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"There is nothing better than moderation
for teaching people or serving Heaven.
Those who use moderation
are already on the path to the Tao.

Those who follow the Tao early
will have an abundance of virtue.
When there is an abundance of virtue,
there is nothing that can not be done.
Where there is limitless ability,
then the kingdom is withing your grasp.
When you know the Mother of the kingdom,
then you will be long enduring.

This is spoken of as the deep root and the firm trunk,
the Way to a long life and great spiritual vision."
-  Translated by J. H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 59  

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"In ruling men and in serving heaven, the Sage uses only moderation.
By moderation alone he is able to have conformed early (to Tao).
This early conformity is called intensive accumulation of virtue.
With this intensive accumulation of virtue, there is nothing that he cannot overcome.
Because there is nothing that he cannot overcome, no one will be able to know his supremacy.
Because no one knows his supremacy he can take possession of a country.
Because what he does is identified with the Mother in taking possession of a country, he can long endure.
This means that he is deep rooted and firmly based, and knows the way of longevity and immortality."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 59 

 

 

"In governing the people and serving Heaven: there is nothing better than frugality.
To be frugal one must be prepared beforehand.
The accumulation of great virtue is the thing that will give you the strength to properly govern and serve.
With virtuous strength nothing is impossible.
This is spoken of this having deep roots and a firm stalk rooted in a solid foundation,
the way of long life and great insight."
-  Translated by Rivenrock, Chapter 59

 

 

"To govern the human and serve the divine, nothing compares to frugality.
Only frugality brings early recovery; only recovery means buildup of power.
Build up virtue, and you master all.
When you master all, no one knows your limit.
When no one knows your limit, you can maintain a nation.
When you maintain the matrix of a nation, you can last long.
This is called making the root deep and the basis firm,
the Way of long life and eternal vision."
-  Translated by Thomas Cleary, Chapter 59 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"In leading people and serving heaven
it is best to be frugal.
Being frugal is to be prepared from the start.
Being prepared from the start is to build up power.
By building up power nothing is impossible.
If nothing is impossible, then there are no limits.
Those without limits are capable of leading a country.
Those with maternal leadership can long endure.
This is to be deeply rooted in a firm foundation,
the way of long life and eternal vision."
-  Translated by Sanderson Beck, Chapter 59 

 

 

"In governing the people and serving Heaven: there is nothing better than frugality.
To be frugal one must be prepared beforehand.
The accumulation of great virtue is the thing that will give you the strength to properly govern and serve.
With virtuous strength nothing is impossible.
This is spoken of this having deep roots and a firm stalk rooted in a solid foundation,
the way of long life and great insight."
-  Translated by John Dicus, 2002, Chapter 59
 

 

 

To balance our earthly nature and cultivate our heavenly nature, tread the Middle Path.
This Middle Path alone leadeth to the Timely Return to the True Nature.
This Timely Return resulteth from the constant gathering of Magick
Powers. With that Gathering cometh Control.
This Control we know to be without Limit and he who knoweth the Limitless may rule the state.
He who possesseth the Tao continueth long.
He is like a plant with well-set roots and strong stems.
Thus it secureth long continuance of its life."
-  Translated by Aleister Crowley, 1918, Chapter 59 

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"To rule men and serve heaven, there is nothing like thrift.
Now,
Only through thrift can one be prepared;
Being prepared means having a heavy store of integrity;
With a heavy store of integrity, he can overcome everything.
Able to overcome everything, no one knows his limits;
If no one knows his limits, he can have the kingdom;
Having the mother of the kingdom, he can long endure.
This is called "sinking roots firm and deep, the Way of long life and lasting vision.""
-  Translated by Victor Mair, Chapter 59 

 

 

"In ruling people and serving heaven,
It is best to be sparing.
To be sparing is to yield quickly.
To yield quickly is to double-store virtue.
If virtue is double-stored
Nothing can’t be overcome.
When nothing can’t be overcome,
No one can know his limits.
When no one knows his limits,
That one can take on the country.
When that one takes on
The mother of the country,
He can last and endure.
Call this having deep roots
And a strong stem:
Living, lasting,
And seeing into Tao."
-  Translated by Herrymoon Maurer, 1985, Chapter 59 

 

 

"To lead men and serve heaven, weigh the worth
Of the one source:
Use the single force
Which doubles the strength of the strong
By enabling man to go right, disabling him to go wrong,
Be so charged with the nature of life that you give your people birth,
That you mother your land, are the fit
And ever-iving root of it:
The seeing root, whose eye is infinite."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 59 

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

 

                                     

 

 

 

"To govern men and to serve heaven nothing is better than to have a reserve.
The Master indeed has a reserve; it is called brilliant foresight.
Brilliant foresight is called the increasing abundance of Teh.
If you have an ever-increasing abundance of Teh , then your Inner Life is unconquerable.
If you Inner Life in unconquerable, then its limits cannot be known.
If you cannot gauge the limits of your Inner Life, then you shall surely possess the kingdom.
If you possess the Mother of the kingdom,
You shall endure forever.
This is to be deep rooted and to have a firm foundation.
The possessor of Tao shall have enduring life and infinite vision."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 59 

 

 

"In governing the country and serving Heaven, show restraint.
Showing restraint is submission to the Tao.
Submission to the Tao will fill you with Te.
Being filled with Te, there will be no limit to your power,
and there will be nothing you cannot overcome.
When there is nothing you cannot overcome,
you will be a true ruler indeed.
You will be one with the country.
You will be the Mother of the country.
Being the Mother of the country,
you will have deep roots and a firm base.
Your reign will be long–lasting.
This is the Tao of long life and eternal vision."
-  Translated by George Cronk, 1999, Chapter 59 

 

 

"You cannot rule men nor serve heaven unless you have laid up a store;
This “laying up a store” means quickly absorbing,
And “quickly absorbing” means doubling one's garnered “power”.
Double your garnered power and it acquires a strength that nothing can overcome.
If there is nothing it cannot overcome, it know no bounds,
And only what knows no bounds is huge enough to keep a whole kingdom in its grasp.
But only he who having the kingdom goes to the Mother can keep it long.
This is called the art of making the roots strike deep by fencing the trunk,
Of making life long by fixed staring."
-  Translated by Arthur Waley, 1934, Chapter 59 

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   Translated by Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"In governing men or dealing with Heaven there is nothing like moderation,

And moderation is what is called an early habituation,

Which, when acquired, heaps virtues up in vast accumulation.

And then, with virtues thus heaped up in vast accumulation,

To the overcoming of everything there is no limitation,

And when one knows no limits, he may even have the nation.

Possessing the Mother of the State, he is thereby long-enduring,

As we say of a tree, its roots are deep, and its staunch stem reassuring,

In clearest sight to keep the Tao is lasting life securing."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 59 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

 


"To rule the people and serve the world there is nothing better than to follow the model of nature.
To follow the model of nature is to be the early appreciation of Dao.
To be the early appreciation of Dao is to give emphasis to the accumulation of Virtues.
To give emphasis to the accumulation of Virtues there is nothing that cannot be overcome.
When one has nothing that cannot be overcome, then nobody knows his limit.
When nobody knows his limit, then he may have a kingdom to rule.
When one has a kingdom to rule, he may mother (rule) the world.
He may rule everywhere and forever.
This is called the way of deepening the root;
consolidating the sprout;
prolonging the life;
and enduring the rule."
-  Translated by Tang Zi-Chang, Chapter 59 

 

 

 

 

 

"Staatssicherung durch geordnetes Planen
Wer die Menschen im Einklang mit den Ordnungen des Alls führt,
der weiß um die Notwendigkeit fürsorglichen Mühens.
Weitsichtige Fürsorge zwingt zu kluger Planung.

Kluge Planung stärkt die selbstwirkenden Kräfte.
Wer diese Kräfte vermehrt, ist jeder Lage gewachsen.
Wer jeder Lage gewachsen ist,
kann in seinen Wirkungsmöglichkeiten nicht erfaßt werden.

Wer mehr Kräfte besitzt, als er zeigt,
der kann ein Reich führen.
Wer so sein Reich nach den großen Ordnungen führt,
wird nicht versagen:

Er gründet tief und ist festgefügt,
er handelt, das Wesentliche schauend,
im Sinn des Unergründlichen."
-  Translated by Rudolf Backofen, 1949, Chapter 59  

 

 

"Bei der Leitung der Menschen und beim Dienst des Himmels
gibt es nichts Besseres als Beschränkung.
Denn nur durch Beschränkung
kann man frühzeitig die Dinge behandeln.

Durch frühzeitiges Behandeln des Dinge
sammelt man doppelt die Kräfte des Lebens.
Durch diese verdoppelten Kräfte des Lebens
ist man jeder Lage gewachsen.
Ist man jeder Lage gewachsen,
so kennt niemand unsere Grenzen.

Wenn niemand unsere Grenzen kennt,
können wir die Welt besitzen.
Besitzt man die Mutter der Welt,
so gewinnt man ewige Dauer.

Das ist der Sinn der tiefen Wurzel,
des festen Grundes,
des ewigen Daseins
und des dauernden Schauens."
-  Translated by Richard Wilhelm, 1911, Chapter 59 

 

 

"In managing human affairs, there is no better rule than to be sparing.
To be sparing is to forestall;
To forestall is to be prepared and strengthened;
To be prepared and strengthened is to be ever-victorious;
To be ever-victorious is to have infinite capacity;
He who has infinite capacity is fit to rule a country,
And the Mother (principle) of a ruling country can long endure.
This is to be firmly rooted, to have deep strength,
The road to immortality and enduring vision."
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1955, Chapter 59 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

 

"In ruling men and in serving Heaven there is nothing like moderation.
By means of it one attains to his first estate.
When this is attained a man is possessed of an indefinite store of virtue.
With such a store of virtue he will overcome everything.
And of this mastery there will be no limit.
Thus, without hindrance, he may possess the Kingdom.
Such a man has the mother-constitution, and will endure indefinitely.
He is like the plant whose roots are deep and whose stem is firm.
Thus may a man live long and see many days."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 59 

 

 

In governing men and serving Heaven, there is nothing equal to temperance.
It is only by temperance that one may be said to submit to Tao.
Early submission to Tao implies a heavy accumulation of virtue.
When virtue is thus heavily accumulated there is nothing to which the man is inadequate;
     when there is nothing to which a man is inadequate,
     it is impossible to know the limit of his resources;
     and the man whose resources are thus limitless, is fit to possess the State.
The possession of the Mother of the State involves its long endurance.
It may then be said to have a deep root and a solid stalk.
This is the Tao which gives immortality and the power of long observing the affairs of the world."
-  Translated by Frederic Henry Balfour, 1884, Chapter 59  

 

 

"The best thing in life is to be thrifty.
Only when you are thrifty, can you be prepared ahead of time.
Preparing ahead of time allows you to accumulate more De.
Accumulating more DE allows you to overcome everything.
Overcoming everything allows you to have unmeasurable limits.
Having unmeasurable limits allows you to control a country.
When a country has the Dao, it can last long.
This is how you deepen and secure your roots, live long and last forever."
-  Translated by Xiaolin Yang, Chapter 59 

 

 

"Pour gouverner les hommes et servir le ciel, rien n'est comparable à la modération.
La modération doit être le premier soin de l'homme.
Quand elle est devenue son premier soin, on peut dire qu'il accumule abondamment la vertu.
Quand il accumule abondamment la vertu, il n'y a rien dont il ne triomphe.
Quand il n'y a rien dont il ne triomphe, personne ne connaît ses limites.
Quand personne ne connaît ses limites, il peut posséder le royaume.
Celui qui possède la mère du royaume peut subsister longtemps.
C'est ce qu'on appelle avoir des racines profondes et une tige solide.
Voilà l'art de vivre longuement et de jouir d'une existence durable."
-  Translated by Stanislas Julien, 1842, Chapter 59 

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

 

"Gobernando a los hombres y sirviendo al cielo nada mejor que la moderación.
La moderación es el retorno al estado primordial.
El retorno al estado primordial es acumular doble reserva de virtud,
Acumular doble reserva de virtud,
Significa que nada podrá dejar de hacerse.
No habiendo nada que pueda dejar de hacerse, nadie conoce sus límites.
Cuando nadie conoce sus límites, el imperio se mantiene.
Quien mantiene a la madre del imperio, perdurará.
Esta es la profunda raíz que se fundamenta en el Tao.
Secreto de longevidad y visión eterna."
Translation from Logia Medio Dia, 2015, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 59

 

 

"Para gobernar a los hombres y servir al cielo,
nada es mejor qu la moderación,
porque sólo el que practique la moderación
conseguirá pronto el Tao.
El que consiga pronto el Tao
adquirirá una doble reserva de virtud
triunfará en todo;
el que triunfe en todo
no conocerá límites en su poder;
el que no conoce estos límites
puede poseer un reino;
el ue posee la madre del reino
puede conservarlo mucho tiempo.
He aquí lo que se llama:
'El camino de la raíz profunda, de la base firme,
de la longevidad y de la visión duradera.'  "
-  Translated by Alba, 1998, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 59 

 

 

"Preocupándonos por los otros y sirviendo al cielo,
No existe nada mejor que usar el límite.
Limitarse comienza renunciando a sus propias ideas.
Esto depende en la Virtud acumulada en el pasado.
Si existe una buena provisión de Virtud,
entonces nada es imposible.
Si nada es imposible, entonces no existe los límites.
Si un hombre no conoce los límites es apto para ser guía.
El principio superior de gobernar se mantiene apto por mucho tiempo.
Esto es denominado tener raíces profundas y una base firme,
el Tao de una larga vida y una eterna visión."
-  Translated by Cristina Bosch, 2002, Capítulo 59  

 

 

"Para gobernar al pueblo en armonía con el Universo,
lo mejor es la moderación.
La moderación implica renunciar a intereses personales.
Quien consigue pronto la moderación,
acumula mucha virtud.
Con la virtud acumulada,
vencerá en todo.
Venciendo en todo,
llegará a límites insospechados.
Al no guiarse por límites se puede ser un gran guía.
Un gran guía puede poseer la Madre del reino, y
puede ser perdurable en ello.
El Tao implica adquirir raíces profundas y bases firmes.
Esto conlleva a una larga vida con la visión de la Mutación Perpetua."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 59

 

 

"En el gobierno de los hombres y al servicio del cielo,
lo mejor es la moderación.
La moderación todo lo somete.
Quien consigue pronto el sometimiento,
acumula mucha virtud.
Con la virtud acumulada,
vencerá en todo.
Venciendo en todo,
llegará a límites insospechados.
Puede incluso apoderarse del reino.
Poseyendo a la Madre del reino,
puede durar mucho tiempo.
Es el camino de la profunda raíz de la sólida base,
del largo vivir y vista duradera."
-  Spanish Version Online at RatMachines, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 59 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #60

Previous Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #58

Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 59

 

Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse.  Complete versions of all 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching by many different translators in many languages: 124 English, 24 German, 14 Russian, 7 Spanish, 5 French and many other languages.  Links are organized first by languages, and then alphabetically by translators.  Formatting varies somewhat.  The original website at Onekellotus went offline in 2012; but, the extensive collection of these Tao Te Ching versions was saved for posterity by the Internet Archive Wayback Machine and available as of 9/9/2015.  This is an outstanding original collection of versions of the Daodejing─ the Best on the Internet.  Caution: copyright infringement may sometimes be an issue at this website. 


Tao Te Ching, Translations into English: Terebess Asia Online (TAO).  124 nicely formatted complete English language translations, on separate webpages, of the Daodejing.  Alphabetical index by translators.  Each webpage has all 81 chapters of the Tao Te Ching translated into English.  A useful collection!  Many reformatted and colored versions from the original collection at Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse.  Caution: copyright infringement may sometimes be an issue at this website. 


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Tao Te Ching  Translated by D. C. Lau.  Addison Wesley, Reprint Edition, 2000.  192 pages.  ISBN: 978-0140441314. 

 

 

                                                        

 

 

The Taoism Reader  By Thomas Cleary.  Shambhala, 2012.  192 pages.


The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons.  By Deng Ming-Dao.  New York, Harper Collins, 2013.  429 pages.  


Change Your Thoughts - Change Your Life: Living the Wisdom of the Tao  By Wayne W. Dyer.  Hay House, Reprint Edition, 2009.  416 pages. 


The Sage's Tao Te Ching: Ancient Advice for the Second Half of Life  By William Martin.   The Experiment, 10th Anniversary Edition, 2010.  144 pages.


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Translators Index, Tao Te Ching Versions in English, Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions of the Chapters 


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español, Translators Index 


Concordance to the Daodejing


The Tao of Zen.  By Ray Grigg.  Tuttle, 2012, 256 pages.  Argues for the view that Zen is best characterized as a version of philosophical Taoism (i.e., Laozi and Zhuangzi) and not Mahayana Buddhism. 


Chapter 1 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6   Valley Spirit Center in Red Bluff, California.   Sacred Circle in the Gushen Grove. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Mind-Body Arts, Philosophy, Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2015. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

This webpage was last modified or updated on September 13, 2015. 

This webpage was first distributed online on June 29, 2011. 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0


 

 

Michael P. Garofalo's E-mail

Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, California

Study Qigong or Taijiquan or Philosophy with Mike Garofalo

 

 

 

 


Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides
 

Cloud Hands Blog


Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

Bodymind Theory and Practices, Somaesthetics

The Five Senses

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons

Grandmaster Chang San Feng

Virtues

Qigong (Chi Kung) Health Practices

One Old Daoist Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

Comments, Feedback, Kudos

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles (1892) and Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanizations

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

 

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