Chapter 61

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

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Chapter 61

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  The Virtue of Humility, Stillness, Great States Need to Acquiesce, Receptivity, Quietude, Female (p'in), Passivity is Power, Woman, Serving, Male (mou), Adequate Food, Boundary (pu kuo), Humility, Large Country, Stillness (ching), Small Country, Motherhood, Abasement, Bending, Condescension, Sea, State, Wife, Water, Low Lying (hsia), Submission, Rivers, Acquiescence, Compromise, Cooperate, Heaven (t'ien hsia) People, Nation, Benefits, Government, Politics, International Relations, Lowering (hsia), Diplomacy, Service, Unity, Peace,  謙德  

Términos en Español:  La Virtud de la humildad, Quietud, Receptividad, Hembra, La pasividad es Poder, Mujer, Servir, Masculino, Comida, Límite, Humildad, Grande País, Pequeño País, Maternidad, Humillación, Doblado, Condescendencia, Mar, Estado, Esposa, Agua, Bajo, Ŕio, Sumisión, Aquiescencia, Compromiso, Cooperar, Cielo, Personas, Nación, Beneficios, Gobierno, Política, Relaciones Internacionales, Bajada, Diplomacia, Servicio, Unidad, Paz.  

 

 

 

"A great state, one that lowly flows, becomes the empire's union, and the empire's wife.
The wife always through quietude conquers her husband, and by quietude renders herself lowly. 
Thus a great state through lowliness toward small states will conquer the small states,
And small states through lowliness toward great states will conquer great states. 
Therefore some render themselves lowly for the purpose of conquering;
Others are lowly and therefore conquer. 
A great state desires no more than to unite and feed the people;
A small state desires no more than to devote itself to the service of the people;
Both may obtain their wishes, the greater one must stoop."
-  Translated by D. T. Suzuki and Paul Carus, 1913, Chapter 61  

 

 

"What makes a great state is its being like a low-lying, down-flowing stream;
It becomes the centre to which tend all the small states under heaven.
To illustrate from the case of all females:
The female always overcomes the male by her stillness.
Stillness may be considered a sort of abasement.
Thus it is that a great state, by condescending to small states, gains them for itself;
And that small states, by abasing themselves to a great state, win it over to them.
In the one case the abasement leads to gaining adherents, in the other case to procuring favor. 
The great state only wishes to unite men together and nourish them;
A small state only wishes to be received by, and to serve, the other.
Each gets what it desires, but the great state must learn to abase itself."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 61 

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"Here is the formula
for discovery
of the original self

see yourself as a great river
identify wit the fountainhead in the mountains
identify with the watercourse across the land
identify with the emptying into the great sea

this is the receptive

rest peacefully within the shape of
an empty vessel
blanketing your bodymind with stillness

tranquil sitting
balances the naturally expressive
with the naturally receptive

see the great river within you
see the great river beneath you
see the great river above you
see yourself as small within the great river

the great and the small have no meaning
on their own
because they are the same thing

they wish to serve each other

bring them together
as the river connects the mountain spring
to the vast ocean

and the original self
will appear."
-  Translated by John Bright-Fey, 2006, Chapter 61 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"A great nation is low, like a river delta,
where all the waters gather.
It is mother of the world.
The female overcomes the male with stillness,
Becomes the foundation by being still.
Thus a great nation should always place itself below a small one."
-  Translated by Ned Ludd, Chapter 61  

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"A great state that is useful is like a bond of unity within the Empire; it is the Empire's wife.
The female controls the male by her quietude and submission.
Thus a great state by its service to smaller states wins their allegiance.
A small state by submission to a great state wins an influence over them.
Thus some stoop to conquer, and others stoop and conquer.
Great states can have no higher purpose than to federate states and feed the people.
Small states can have no higher purpose than to enter a federation and serve the people.
Both alike, each in his own way, gain their end, but to do so, the greater must practice humility."
-  Translated by Dwight Goddard, 1919, Chapter 61 

 

 

 

 

大國者下流.
天下之交.
天下之牝.
牝常以靜勝牡.
以靜為下, 故大國以下小國.
則取小國.
小國以下大國, 則取大國.
故或下以取.
或下而取.
大國不過欲兼畜人.
小國不過欲入事人.
夫兩者各得其所欲.
大者宜為下.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 61 

 

 

ta kuo chê hsia liu.
t'ien hsia chih chiao.
t'ien hsia chih p'in.
p'in ch'ang yi ching shêng mu.
yi ching wei hsia, ku ta kuo yi hsia hsiao kuo.
tsê ch'ü hsiao kuo.
hsiao kuo yi hsia ta kuo, tsê ch'ü ta kuo.
ku huo hsia yi ch'ü.
huo hsia erh ch'ü.
ta kuo pu kuo yü chien hsü jên.
hsiao kuo pu kuo yü ju shih jên.
fu liang chê ko tê ch'i so yü.
ta chê yi wei hsia.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 61 

 


Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 61 of the Tao Te Ching

 


da guo zhe xia liu.
tian xia zhi jiao.
tian xia zhi pin.
pin chang yi jing sheng mu.
yi jing wei xia, gu da guo yi xia xiao guo.
ze qu xiao guo.
xia guo yi xia da guo, ze qu da guo.
gu huo xia yi qu.
huo xia er qu.
da guo bu guo yu jian xu ren.
xiao guo bu guo yu ru shi ren.
fu liang zhe ge de qi suo yu.
da zhe yi wei xia.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 61 

 
 
 
 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Google Translator

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

 

"The great country may be compared to a low-lying lake where many rivers converge;
it is the mixing place of the world, the reservoir of all under heaven... the Feminine of the world.
Femininity always overcomes Masculinity, by stillness,
her tranquility gives rise to her humility.
Thus it is that the great country can win over the small country by this practicing of stillness and humility.
And the small state by the practice of humility and deference to the large country
can gain the large country and become one with it.
So it is said that by practice of quiescence and humility the great can absorb and conquer the small without effort,
and the small and insignificant can gain riches and treasure by submitting to the great.
The great state wishes to keep and nourish its people, and help others.
The small state wishes to help its people by joining with the peace and strength of the larger state.
Both states get what they wish by submitting.
Greatness lies in placing oneself below."
-  Translated by John Dicus, 2002, Chapter 61 

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"A large country is the low level of interflowing rivers.
It draws people to the sea-end of a valley
As the female draws the male,
Receives it into absorbing depth
Because depth always absorbs.
And so a large country, inasfar as it is deeper than a small country,
Absorbs the small-
Or a small country, inasfar as it is deeper than a large country,
Absorbs the large.
Some countnes consciously seek depth into which to draw others.
Some countries naturally have depth into which to draw others:
A large country needs to admit,
A small country needs to emit,
And so each country can naturally have what it needs
If the large country submit."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 61 

 

 

"A great kingdom is like the mouth of rivers; it is like the female, or the hub of the world.
Females frequently win males with their serenity.
Serenity means humbleness.
Therefore when a great kingdom is humble, it wins small kingdoms.
When a small kingdom is humble, it wins great kingdoms.
This is why with humbleness one can win and will win.
A great kingdom should not excessively conquer.
A small kingdom should avoid undue vassalage.
In order for both great and small kingdoms to have their wishes,
it is better for great kingdoms to be humble."
-  Translated by Thomas Zhang, Chapter 61 

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons


                             

 

 

 

"A large state is like low-lying land where the flowing waters meet:
The female of the world.
It is the stillness of the feminine which overcomes the masculine.
Keeping still is to keep to the lower position.
Therefore the large state can conquer the small state by giving way to the small state.
And the small state can conquer the large state by submitting to the large state.
Thus, in order to conquer one must yield,
And those who conquer do so by yielding.
Since the large state wishes to take in more people,
And the small state wishes to serve the people,
Both have their wishes met.
It is right for a large state to yield."
-  Translated by Keith H. Seddon, Chapter 61    

 

 

"A great state is the worlds low-stream (to which all the river flows down), the world's field and the world's female.
The female always conquers the male by quietude, which is employed as a means to lower oneself. Thus a great state lowers itself towards a small state before it takes over the small state.
A small state lowers itself towards a great state before it takes over the great state.
Therefore some lower themselves to take, while some lower themselves to gather.
A great state wishes nothing more than to have and keep many people, and a small state wishes nothing more than to get more things to do.
When the two both mean to obtain their wishes, the greater one should lower itself."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 61 

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"A great country is like low-lying land
into which all rivers flow.
It is the meeting place of everything upon the earth,
the female of the world.

The female can always overcome the male by stillness,
by taking up a lower place.
And so by taking up a lower place,
a great country can win over a smaller one.

By taking up a lower place,
a small country can win over a greater one.
The one wins by becoming low,
the other wins by remaining low.

A great country wants nothing more
than to unite and feed its people.
A small country wants nothing more
than to come and serve its people.

Both get what they desire,
but it is fitting that the greater should abase itself."
-  Translated by Tim Chilcott, 2005, Chapter 61 

 

 

"A large country should take the low place like a great watershed,
which from its low position assumes the female role.
The female overcomes the male by the power of her position.
Her tranquility gives rise to her humility.

If a large country takes the low position,
it will be able to influence smaller countries.
If smaller countries take the lower position,
then they can allow themselves to be influenced.
So both seek to take the lower position
in order to influence the other, or be influenced.

Large countries should desire to protect and help the people,
and small countries should desire to serve others.
Both large and small countries benefit greatly from humility."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 61 

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

 

                                     

 

 

 

"A great kingdom, lowly like running water, is the Meeting-place of the world.
It is the feminine quality of the world.
The feminine quality always overcomes the masculine by stillness.
In order to be still, we must become lowly.
Therefore, if a great kingdom is lowly towards a little kingdom it will take possession of the little kingdom.
If a little kingdom is lowly towards a great kingdom it will take possession of the great kingdom.
So one becomes lowly in order to conquer,
The other is lowly and yet it conquers.
If a great kingdom only desires to unify and nourish men,
If a small kingdom only desires to enter in and serve men,
Then the Master, in each case, shall obtain his desire.
He who is great ought to be lowly."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 61 

 

 

To be great, a state must be passively receptive, like the ocean which accepts whatever the rivers bring into it, or like the feminine which always submits to the masculine.
Recall how the female always overcomes the male by means of her passivity.
Passivity is submissiveness.
Thus, the great state places itself at the service of a small state before before it absorbs the small state.
And a small state must serve the interests of the great state before it can be taken into the great state.
Hence, some submit in order to take, while others submit in order to be taken.
When a great state desires to have more people, and a small state desires to be protected,
it is by submission that both obtain what they desire."
-  Translated by Archie J. Bahm, 1958, Chapter 61

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   Translated by Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"A great state is like a great river,

Down flowing with movement and life,

Of all under heaven the union,

Of all under heaven the wife.

 

Consider the female, the woman

Overcomes by her quietude wholly,

Some make themselves lowly to conquer,

Some conquer because they are lowly.

 

And so a great state condescending

 Will win smaller states to unite,

And small states, themselves by abasement

Will conquer far more than by fight.

 

If the great state desire but to nourish,

And the small to preserve and extend,

Then each has secured what it sought for,

But to do this the great one must bend."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 61 

 

 

 

A large country is the low level of interflowing rivers.
It draws people to the sea-end of a valley
As the female draws the male,
Receives it into absorbing depth
Because depth always absorbs.
And so a large country, insofar as it is deeper than a small country,
Absorbs the small-
Or a small country, insofar as it is deeper than a large country,
Absorbs the large.
Some countries consciously seek depth into which to draw others.
Some countries naturally have depth into which to draw others:
A large country needs to admit,
A small country needs to emit,
And so each country can naturally have what it needs
If the large country submit."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 61 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"The kingdom, like a river, becomes great by being lowly; it is thereby the centre to which all the world tends.
It is similar in the case of woman:
She conquers man by continual quietness.
And quietness is the same as submission.
Therefore a great state, by condescension to those beneath it, may gain the government of them.
Likewise a small state, by submission to one that is greater, may secure its alliance.
Thus the one gains adherence, and the other obtains favours.
Although the great state desires to annex and to nourish others, yet the small state desires to be allied to and serve the greater.
Thus both will be satisfied, if only the greater will condescend."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 61 

 

 

"A great nation flows down To be the world's pool,
The female under heaven In stillness
The female constantly overcomes the male,
In stillness Takes the low place.
Therefore a great nation Lowers itself
And wins over a small one.
A small nation keeps itself low
And wins over a great one.
Sometimes becoming low wins,
Sometimes staying low wins.
A great nation desires nothing more
Than to unite and protect people.
A small nation desires nothing more
Than to enter the service of people.
When both get what they wish
The great one should be low."
-  Translated by Stephen Addis, 1993, Chapter 61 

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

"Un gran reino es como un cauce profundo
hacia el que todo fluye.
Es como la hembra del mundo.
La hembra,
domina al macho al mostrarse cautelosa con él.
un gran reino, mostrándose cauteloso,
adquiere un reino pequeño.
Un reino pequeño, mostrándose cauteloso,
adquiere un gran reino.
Por lo tanto, uno adquiere mostrándose cauteloso,
el otro adquiere mostrándose cauteloso.
Un gran reino, sin sobrepasar sus fronteras,
reúne a todos y los nutre.
Un reino pequeño, sin sobrepasar sus fronteras,
sirve a la gente.
Asi, ambos reciben lo que desean.
Para provecho de ambos y el logro de sus deseos,
el más grande debe mostrarse cauteloso."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 61

 

 

"Un gran Estado es como un cauce muy (hacia el que todos los ríos fluyen).
Es el valle del mundo y la femenino del mundo.
Lo femenino sujeta a lo masculino por la pasividad, que es un modo de ocupar el lugar inferior.
Así, un gran Estado se humilla ante uno pequeño con el fin de someterlo,
     y uno pequeño se humilla ante uno grande con el fin de conquistarlo para él.
Luego unos se humillan con el fin de ser más poderosos, y otros con el fin de ser más extensos.
El deseo de un gran Estado es governar, sobre el mayor número de hombres,
     y el de uno pequeño, ser más útil.
Y así, al considerar que ambos pueden obtener sus deseos, el más grande es el que debería humillarse."
-  Translated into Spanish by Caridad Diaz Faes from the English translation by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 2003, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 61

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 61

 

Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español


Concordance to the Daodejing 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) and Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version.  From the Dao is Open website. 


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 61 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6 


Tao Te Ching English Translations from Terebess Asia Online.  Over 30 translations. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 61, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2014. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

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Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81