Chapter 81

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

Chapter 80     Chapter 1     Index to All the Chapters     Taoism     Cloud Hands Blog

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Chapter 81

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

 

End of the Book of the Te (Virtue, Power) of the Daodejing (Tao Te Ching), Classic of the Way and Virtue
Book of the Te
(Virtue, Powers) = Chapters 38-81.   Book of the Dao (Way, Path) =  Chapters 1-37.

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  The Nature of the Essential, Sincere or Truthful (hsin), Hidden Value, Good Home Life, Simple Living, Propounding the Essential, Sensible Man, Not Arguing, Dispute or Quarrel (pien), Honest Truth, Hoard or Accumulate (chi), Selfish, Long Life, Learned or Erudite (po), Good or Righteous (shan), Helping, Not Hoarding (chi), Hurt or Injure (hai), Way of the Sage, Avoid Scholarship, The Learned (po) May Not Know, Contend or Compete or Contest (chêng), Heavenly Tao, Dao, eloquence, Yielding, Beautiful or Pleasing (mei), Wisdom, Inner Truths, Meditation, Knowing or Aware or Wise (chih), Sharing, Giving, Kindness, Heaven, Tao, Reciprocating, Words (yen), The Manifestation of Simplicity,  顯質


Términos en Español:  La Naturaleza de la Esencial, Sincero, Veraz, Bueno Casa, V
ida, Vida Sencilla, Proponiendo la Esencial, Hombre Sensato, No Discutir, Conflicto, Pelea, Pura Verdad, Tesoro, Acumula, Egoísta, Larga Vida, Aprendida, Erudito, Bueno, Justos, Ayudar, No Acaparamiento, Daño, Camino del Sabio, Evitar la Beca, los Sabios no Puede Saber, Contender, Competir,  Elocuencia, Ceder, Hermoso, Agradable, Sabiduría, Meditación, Compartir, Dar, Generosidad, Cielo, Alternativa, Palabras, Simpleza, Naturalidad, Mostrar lo Esencial.   

 

 

 

"They may have carts and boats
but there will be no need to ride in them;
they may have armor and weapons
but they will never need to display them.
Let the people go back to tying knots for record-keeping;
let their food be savory;
their clothing beautiful;
their customs pleasurable;
their homes secure.
Though they may gaze across at a neighbor's holdings
and hear the sounds of it's dogs and chickens,
they will not bother them, coming and going.
They will die of happy old age."
-  Translated by Jerry C. Welch, Chapter 81 

 

 

"Sincere words are not fine,

Fine words are not sincere,

The Faithful friend will stick to the end,

But the flatterer tickles the ear.

 

The skillful do not debate,

Debaters lack in skill,

For truth is found by looking around,

And words are weapons of ill.

 

The knowing are not most learned,

The most learned do not know,

For knowledge is grown from thought alone,

While learning from others must grow.

 

The sage lays up no treasure,

No hoard of goods or gold,

For they who keep a store-house deep,

A constant watch must hold.

 

The more he works for others

The more he works for his own,

For it grows by use, is lost by abuse,

And he gathers by what he has sown.

 

The more he gives away,

The more does he have himself,

For thought's a thing that from thought will spring,

Which is quite the reverse of pelf.

 

The Way of Heaven is sharp,

But it never will cut nor wound,

For they who swim with the flowing stream

Will ever be safe and sound.

 

T'is the way of the sage to act,

He acts but never strives,

For striving breaks whatever it makes,

And only a wreck survives."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 81

 

 

 

 

 

"Credible words do not sound pretty, pretty words are not credible.
A nice person is not good at arguing, a person who is good at arguing is not nice.
A person who has real knowledge does not show off,
A person who shows off does not have real knowledge.
Great men do not accumulate things for themselves.
The more they do for others, the more they have,
The more they give to others, the more they get.
The law of the heavens is to benefit everything without harming it,
The law of great men is to do things for the world without fighting for the credit."
-  Translated by Xiaolin Yang, Chapter 81

 

 

"Sincere words are not beautiful; beautiful words are not sincere.
Good men are not argumentative, the argumentative are not good.
One who knows is not erudite; the erudite one does not know.
The sage does not take to hoarding.
The more he lives for others, the fuller is his life.
The more he gives, the more he abounds.
The Way of Heaven benefits and does not harm.
The Way of the sage works and does not compete with anyone."
-  Translated by Tien Cong Tran, Chapter 81

 

 

"Believed words lack embellishment
 Embellished words lack belief.
Those who value lack argument
Those who argue lack valuing
Those who know lack learning
Those who learn lack knowing.
The sages are without accumulating
Grasping, it happens they act
Others later gain presence
Grasping, it happens they give
Others later gain abundance.  
The Tao of the heavens
Benefitting yet without spoiling
The Tao of the sages
Acting yet without contending."
-  Translated by David Lindauer, Chapter 81

 

 

"Real words are not vain,
Vain words not real;
And since those who argue prove nothing
A sensible man does not argue.
A sensible man is wiser than he knows,
While a fool knows more than is wise.
Therefore a sensible man does not devise resources:
The greater his use to others
The greater their use to him,
The more he yields to others
The more they yield to him.
The way of life cleaves without cutting:
Which, without need to say,
Should be man's way."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, Chapter 81  

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"Truthful (hsin) words (yen) are not beautiful,
Beautiful (mei) words are not truthful.
The good (shan) does not distinguish,
One who distinguishes (pien) is not good.
One who knows (chih) does not accumulate knowledge,
One who accumulates knowledge (po) does not know.
The sage does not hoard.
Having worked (wei) for his fellow beings,
The more he possesses.
Having donated himself to his fellow beings,
The more abundant he becomes.
The way of heaven,
It benefits (li), but does not harm.
The way of the sage,
He works (wei), but does not contend."
-  Translated by Ellen M. Chen, Chapter 81  

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"True words are not fancy.
Fancy words are not true.
The good do not debate.
Debaters are not good.
The one who really knows is not broadly learned,
The extensively learned do not really know.
The sage does not hoard,
She gives people her surplus.
Giving her surplus to others she is enriched.
The way of Heaven is to help and not harm."
-  Translated by Charles Muller, Chapter 81   

 

 

"Sincere words are not beautiful.
Beautiful words are not sincere.
Those who are good do not engage in disputation;
those who engage in disputation are not good.
Those who know are not broadly learned;
those who are broadly learned do not know.
The sage is not acquisitive.
The more he does for others, the more he himself has.
The more he gives to others, the more he himself possesses.
The Dao of Heaven is to provide benefit without doing harm.
The Dao of the sage is to act without causing contention."
-  Translated by Richard John Linn, Chapter 81 

 

 

"It is one thing to speak elegantly and another to speak sincerely
Knowledge and insight are different things
The first accumulates fine distinctions, precise statements
And the other, well, it sees all as essentially the same

Whoever follows the way hoards nothing
Life is too long a journey to carry excess weight
He uses what he has for others
And finds his spirit lighter and his heart enriched

The tao sustains all without fear of exhaustion
And virtue lies in letting it."
-  Translated by Ted Wrigley, Chapter 81 

 

 

"True words are not beautiful
Beautiful words are not true
Those who are good do not debate
Those who debate are not good
Those who know are not broad of knowledge
Those who are broad of knowledge do not know

Sages do not accumulate
The more they assist others, the more they possess
The more they give to others, the more they gain

The Tao of heaven
Benefits and does not harm
The Tao of sages
Assists and does not contend"
-  Translated by Derek Linn, 2006, Chapter 81 

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"True words are not beautiful;
Beautiful words are not true.
Those who are good do not argue;
Those who argue are not good.
Those who are wise are not learned;
Those who are learned are not wise.
The Sage does not store up possessions.
The more he helps others, the more he fulfils himself.
The more he gives to others, the more he has for himself.
The Way of Heaven is to benefit others whilst harming no one.
The Way of the Sage is to accomplish without striving."
-  Translated by Keith Seddon, Chapter 81  

 

 

 

A Chinese Language Version of Chapter 81 of the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
A note on my style of displaying the Chinese characters of the Tao Te Ching

 

 

信言不美.
美言不信.
善者不辯.
辯者不善.
知者不博.
博者不知.
聖人不積.
既以為人己愈有.
既以與人己愈多.
天之道利而不害.
聖人之道為而不爭.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 81

 

 

hsin yen pu mei.
mei yen pu hsin.
shan chê pu pien.
pien chê pu shan. 
chih chê pu po.
po chê pu chih. 
shêng jên pu chi.
chi yi wei jên chi yü yu.
chi yi yü jên chi yü to.
t'ien chih tao li erh pu hai. 
shêng jên chih tao wei erh pu chêng.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 81

 

Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 81 of the Tao Te Ching

 

xin yan bu mei.
mei yan bu xin.
shan zhe bu bian.
bian zhe bu shan.
zhi zhe bu bo,
bo zhe bu zhi.
sheng ren bu ji.
ji yi wei ren ji yu you.
ji yi yu ren ji yu duo.
tian zhi dao li er bu hai.
sheng ren zhi dao wei er bu zheng.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 81

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin and Wade Giles Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

 

"Faithful words may not be beautiful,
Beautiful words may not be faithful.
Those who love do not quarrel,
Those who quarrel do not love.
Those who know are not learned,
Those who are learned do not know.
The riches of the self-controlled man are in the Inner Life.
When he spends for others, he has more for himself.
When he gives to others, he has much more for himself.
Heavenly Tao blesses all and hurts no one.
The way of the self-controlled man is to act and not to fight."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 81  

 

 

"Sincere words and not pretty.
Pretty words are not sincere.
Good people do not quarrel.
Quarrelsome people are not good.
The wise are not learned.
The learned are not wise.
The Sage is not acquisitive - Has enough By doing for others,
Has even more By giving to others.
Heaven's Tao Benefits and does not harm.
The Sage's Tao Acts and does not contend."
-  Translated by Stephen Addis, 1993, Chapter 81 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  
Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Be Enlightened! A Guidebook to the Tao Te Ching and Taoist Meditation: Your Six-Month Journey to Spiritual Enlightenment   By Wes Burgess
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

 

                             

 

 

 

"No one likes the honest truth,
And all fine talk falls short of it.
Real words are never used to seduce you,
And those that do are no good.
The one who really knows, knows without books
- the so-called learned know nothing.
The sage holds nothing of himself back-
He uses all he has for you, and that is his reward.
He gives all he is
and that is why he's rich.
And the Tao of Heaven
feeds everything, and harms nothing
And the sage's Tao
completes it,
without doing anything."
-  Translated by Kwok, Palmer and Ramsey, Chapter 81  

 

 

"Sincere words are not 'elegant.'  Elegance of speech is insincere.
One who knows is not 'learned;' Learnedness is not knowledge.
One who is 'good' does not have much;  Possessions are not virtue.

Sages do not hoard.
The more they do for others,
the more they have, themselves;
the more they give to others,
the more their own bounty is increased.

Thus the Path of Deity benefits without harming;
the way of ego 'acts' but without effect."
-  Translated by Jerry C. Welch, 1998, Chapter 81 

 

 

"As honest words may not sound fine,
Fine words may not be honest ones;
A good man does not argue, and
An arguer may not be good!
The knowers are not learned men
And learned men may never know.

The Wise Man does not hoard his things;
Hard-pressed, from serving other men,
He has enough and some to spare;
But having given all he had,
He then is very rich indeed.

God's Way is gain that works no harm;
The Wise Man's way, to do his work
Without contending for a crown."
-  Translated by Raymond Blakney, Chapter 81   

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"Words to trust and not refine.
Words refined are not to trust.
Good men are not gifted speakers.
Gifted speakers are not good.
Experts are not widely learned;
The widely learned not expert.
Wise rulers for themselves keep naught,
Yet gain by having done for all,
Have more for having freely shared;
Do good not harm is heaven’s Way;
The wise act for and not against."
-  Translated by Moss Roberts, Chapter 81 

 

 

"True words are not beautiful;
Beautiful words are not true.
A good man does not argue;
He who argues is not a good man.
A wise man has no extensive knowledge;
He who has extensive knowledge is not a wise man.
The sage does not accumulate for himself.
The more he uses for others, the more he possesses of his own.
The Way of Heaven is to benefit others and not to injure.
The Way of the sage is to act but not to compete."
-   Translated by Chang Wing-Tsit, 1963, Chapter 81 

 

 

"Faithful words are not pleasant.
Pleasant, or specious, words are not faithful.
The virtuous do not bandy arguments.
Those who bandy arguments are not virtuous.
The wise do not seek learning from outside.
Those who do so are not wise.
The Sage does not lay up hidden stores of Tao.
The more he employs it on behalf of others the more he has for himself.
The more he imparts to others, the more his own stores increase.
The Tao of Heaven confers benefit, and injures not.
The Tao of the Sage acts, and does not strive."
-  Translated by Frederic Henry Balfour, 1884, Chapter 81 

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"Truth need not be eloquent
And eloquence may not be true
There is no need to argue
When truth is shining through

Those who see may not be learned
The learned may not see
To see you merely need to look
In pure simplicity

The seer doesn't have to hoard
And does not fear to lose
The more you give, the more you have
So why should you refuse?

Why not give it all away?
For emptiness brings benefit
And as the seers always say
The more you give, the more you get."
-  Translated by Jim Clatfelter, Chapter 81   

 

 

"True words are not beautiful.
Beautiful words are not true.
One who knows isn’t comprehensive.
One who is comprehensive doesn’t know.
One who is good doesn’t have numerous sides.
One who has numerous sides is not good.

A wise person accumulates nothing.
Having already acted for another person, her own individuality has more reason for existing.
Having already given to another person, her own individuality multiplies more and more.

Therefore, the heaven’s Dao is beneficial, and doesn’t harm.
A person’s Dao takes action, but isn’t willing to contend."
-  Translated by Nina Correa, 2005, Chapter 81 

 

 

"True words do not sound beautiful;
beautiful sounding words are not true.
Wise men don't need to debate;
men who need to debate are not wise.

Wise men are not scholars,
and scholars are not wise.
The Master desires no possessions.
Since the things she does are for the people,
she has more than she needs.
The more she gives to others,
the more she has for herself.

The Tao of Heaven nourishes by not forcing.
The Tao of the Wise person acts by not competing."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 81  

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

 

                                     

 

 

 

"He who knows, speaks not.
He who speaks, knows not.
He who is sincere, does not embellish.
He who embellishes, is not sincere.
He who is good, disputes not.
He who disputes, is not good.
He who knows, does not game.
He who games, knows not."
-  Translated by Jan Duyvendak, Chapter 81 

 

 

"True words aren't elaborate.
Elaborate words aren't true.
Good people don't argue.
People who argue aren't good.
People who know aren't full of facts.
People who are full of facts don't know.
The sage doesn't hoard.
She increases her treasure by working for her fellow human beings.
She increases her abundance by giving herself to them.
The way of heaven: benefit all, harm none.
The way of the sage: work for all, contend with none."
-  Translated by Brian Browne Walker, 1996, Chapter 81 

 

 

"True words are not fine-sounding;
Fine-sounding words are not true.
A good man does not argue;
he who argues is not a good man.
The wise one does not know many things;
He who knows many things is not wise.

The Sage does not accumulate for himself.
He lives for other people,
And grows richer himself;
He gives to other people,
And has greater abundance.

The Tao of Heaven
Blesses, but does not harm.
The Way of the Sage
Accomplishes, but does not contend."
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1955, Chapter 81

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   By Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"He who knows does not speak;
He who speaks does not know.
He who is truthful is not showy;
He who is showy is not truthful.
He who is virtuous does not dispute.
He who disputes is not virtuous.
He who is learned is not wise.
He who is wise is not learned.
Therefore the Sage does not display his own merits."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 81 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

 

 

"Sincere words are not grand.
Grand words are not faithful.
The man of Tao does not dispute.
Those who know it are not learned.
The learned do not know it.
The wise man does not lay up treasure.
The more he expends on others, the more he gains for himself.
The more he gives to others, the more he has for his own.
This is the Tao of Heaven, which penetrates but does not injure.
This is the Tao of the wise man, who acts but does not strive."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 81  

 

 

"Wahre Worte sind nicht schön,
schöne Worte sind nicht wahr.
Tüchtigkeit überredet nicht,
Überredung ist nicht tüchtig.
Der Weise ist nicht gelehrt,
der Gelehrte ist nicht weise.
Du Berufene häuft keinen Besitz auf.
Je mehr er für andere tut,
desto mehr besitzt er.
Je mehr er anderen gibt,
desto mehr hat er.
Des Himmels Sinn ist fördern, ohne zu schaden.
Des Berufenen Sinn ist wirken, ohne zu streiten."
-  Translated by Richard Wilhelm, 1911, Chapter 81

 

 

"Truthful words do not sound sweet;
Sweet words are not truthful.
Good men do not argue;
Those who argue are lacking in goodness.
The seers of truth are not vast in learning;
People with vast learning are not seers.
The Sage does not hoard.
The more he serves the people,
The more he gains.
The more he gives to the people,
The more he possesses.
The Way of Heaven is to benefit, not to harm;
The way of the Sage is to act, not to contend."
-  Translated by Henry Wei, 1982, Chapter 81 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"Truth has no need for fine words;
Fine words may not be true words.
The man of Tao does not try to convince by argument:
He who argues is not a man of Tao.
Wisdom does not consist in knowing everything;
The know-alls do not know the Tao.
The Sage does not hoard. The more he spends himself for others, the more he enriches himself.
The more he fives, the more he gains.
For the Tao of Heaven penetrates all things but harms none.
This, too, is the Tao of the Sage, who acts without contending."
-  Translated by Herman Ould, 1946, Chapter 81  

 

 

"Words born of the mind are not true
True words are not born of the mind
Those who have virtue do not look for faults
Those who look for faults have no virtue
Those who come to know it do not rely on learning
Those who rely on learning do not come to know it
The Sage sees the world as an expansion of his own self
So what need has he to accumulate things?
By giving to others he gains more and more
By serving others he receives everything
Heaven gives and all things turn out for the best
The Sage lives, and all things go as Tao goes all things move as the wind blows"
-  Translated by Jonathan Star, 2001, Chapter 81

 

 

Sincere words are not fine; fine words are not sincere.
Those who are skilled in the Tao do not dispute about it; the disputatious are not skilled in it.
Those who know the Tao are not extensively learned; the extensively learned do not know it.
The sage does not accumulate for himself.
The more that he expends for others, the more does he possess of his own;
The more that he gives to others, the more does he have himself.
With all the sharpness of the Way of Heaven, it injures not;
Wth all the doing in the way of the sage he does not strive."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 81 

 

 

"Les paroles sincères ne sont pas élégantes; les paroles élégantes ne sont pas sincères.
L'homme vertueux n'est pas disert; celui qui est disert n'est pas vertueux.
Celui qui connaît le Tao n'est pas savant; celui qui est savant ne le connaît pas.
Le Saint n'accumule pas les richesses.
Plus il emploie sa vertu dans l'intérêt des hommes, et plus elle augmente.
Plus il donne aux hommes et plus il s'enrichit.
Telle est la voie du ciel, qu'il est utile aux êtres et ne leur nuit point.
Telle est la voie du Saint, qu'il agit et ne dispute point."
-  Translated by Stanislas Julien, 1842, Chapter 81

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español

 

Lao Tsé. Tao Te Ching   Translated into Spanish by Anton Teplyy  

Tao Te Ching   Translated by Stephen Mitchell, Spanish version

Tao Te Ching   Translated into Spanish by Father Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons  

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Translated by Yuanxiang Xu and Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Translations into the Spanish Language

Tao Te Ching   Translated by William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Translated by Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu


 

                                      

 

 

"Las palabras sinceras no son agradables, las palabras agradables no son sinceras.
Las buenas personas no son discutidoras, las discutidoras no son buenas.
Las personas sabias no son eruditas, las eruditas no son sabias.
El Sabio no toma nada para acaparar, cuanto más vive para los demás, más plena es su vida.
Cuanto más da, más nada en la abundancia.
La Ley del Cielo es beneficia, no perjudicar.
La Ley del sabio es cumplir su deber, no luchar contra nadie."
-  Translated in English by John C. H. Wu, Spanish version by Alfonso Colodrón, 2007, Capítulo 81  

 

 

"Las palabras verdaderas no son agradables;
las palabras agradables no son verdaderas.
Un hombre de bien no es un parlanchín;
Un parlanchín no es un hombre de bien.
La inteligencia no es la erudición;
La erudición no es la inteligencia.
El santo se guarda de amontonar;
al consagrarse a los demás, sen enriquece,
después de haber dado todo, todavía posee más.
El camino del cielo nos trae ventajas sin perjudicar;
la virtud del santo actúa sin reclamar nada."
-  Translation by Alba, 1998, Capítulo 81

 

 

"Las palabras veraces no son agradables;
Las palabras agradables no son veraces.
El hombre bueno no gusta de discutir;
El hombre que gusta de discutir, no es bueno.
El sabio no es erudito
y el erudito no es sabio.
El sabio nunca trata de atesorar cosas.
cuanto más vive para los demás, más plena es su vida.
El Tao del Cielo beneficia y no perjudica.
El Tao del Sabio es obrar, no rivalizar."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Capítulo 81

 

 

"Las palabras veraces no son hermosas.
Las palabras hermosas no son veraces.
Lo bueno no es elocuente.
Lo elocuente no es bueno.
El sabio no es erudito.
El erudito no es sabio.
El sabio no actúa para acumular.
Cuanto más entrega a los demás, tanto más posee para sí.
Cuanto más dones ofrece a los demás, tanto más consigue para sí.
La norma del cielo es dar beneficios y no dañar.
El proceder del sabio es actuar sin luchar."
Translation from Logia Medio Dia, 2015, Capítulo 81 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Previous Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #80

Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 81

 

Tao Te Ching, Translations into English: Terebess Asia Online (TAO).  124 nicely formatted complete English language translations, on separate webpages, of the Daodejing.  Alphabetical index by translators.  Each webpage has all 81 chapters of the Tao Te Ching translated into English.  An outstanding collection─ the Best on the Internet. 


Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Concordance to the Daodejing


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  VSCL.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi)  226-249 CE  Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 81 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6 


Tao Te Ching English Translations from Terebess Asia Online.  Over 30 translations. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 81, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching

Research by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2015. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo


This webpage was last modified or updated on August 28, 2015. 
       
This webpage was first distributed online on February 2, 2011.

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

Michael P. Garofalo's E-mail

Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, California

Study Chi Kung or Tai Chi or Philosophy with Mike Garofalo

 

 

 


Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Valley Spirit T'ai Chi Ch'uan - Cloud Hands


Cloud Hands Blog


Valley Spirit Qigong (Chi Kung, Dao Yin, Neidan, Yangsheng)

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Virtues

Meditation

Bodymind Theory and Practices, Somaesthetics

The Five Senses

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons

Grandmaster Chang San Feng

Virtues

Qigong (Chi Kung) Health Practices

One Old Daoist Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Martial Arts

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Tao Te Ching

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81