Chapter 50

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

Chapter 49     Chapter 51     Index to All the Chapters     Taoism     Cloud Hands Blog

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Chapter 50

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  The Value Set on Life, Value Life, Esteem Life, Become Invulnerable, Followers of Life, Rhinos, Tigers, War, Invulnerable, Three Out of Ten, Accept Death, Immunity, Nourish Life, Avoid Injury, Invincible, Weapons, Protected, Immortality, Inner Life, Dying, Freedom, Percentages, Odds, Liberation, Out of Harms Way, Fearless,  貴生

Términos en Español:  Vida Valor, Estima la Vida, Volverá Invulnerable, Seguidores de la Vida, Rinocerontes, Tigres, Guerra, Tres de Cada Diez, Aceptar la Muerte, Inmunidad, Nutrir la Vida, Armas, Protegida, Inmortalidad, Vida Interior, Libertad, Porcentajes, Probabilidades, Liberación, Sin Miedo  

 

"Exiting life, we enter death.
The followers of life are three out of ten, the followers of death are three out of ten; in the lives of the people, the dying grounds on which they are agitated are also three out of ten.
What is the reason?
Because of the seriousness with which they take life as life.
It has been said that those who maintain life well do not meet rhinos or tigers on land and do not arm themselves in war.
There is no way for rhinos to gore them; there is no way for tigers to claw them; there is no way for weapons to get at them.
Why?
Because they have no dying ground."
-  Translated by Thomas Cleary, Chapter 50 

 

 

"Life is a going forth; death is a returning home.
Of ten, three are seeking life, three are seeking death, and three are dying.
What is the reason?
Because they live in life's experience. (Only one is immortal.)
I hear it said that the sage when he travels is never attacked by rhinoceros or tiger, and when coming among soldiers does not fear their weapons.
The rhinoceros would find no place to horn him, nor the tiger a place for his claws, nor could soldiers wound him.
What is the reason?
Because he is invulnerable."
-  Translated by Dwight Goddard, Chapter 50 

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons


                             

 

 

 

"From coming out to life to going back to death:
Those companions (t'u) of life,
They are one-third (shih-yu-san);
Those companions of death,
They are one-third;
Those living but moving toward the place of death,
They are also one-third.
Why?
Because of the intense (hou) life-producing activity.
I have heard that one who knows how to nourish life,
On land meets no tigers or wild buffaloes,
In battle needs to wear no armors or weapons,
A wild buffalo has nowhere to butt its horns,
A tiger has nowhere to sink its claws,
A weapon has nowhere to enter its blade.
Why?
Because such a one has no place of death."
-  Translated by Ellen M. Chen, Chapter 50 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"People are born on the Earth and die.
Out of ten about three continue then paradisiacal existence; three go to hell by the path of death; and three yet are those who have not succeeded in the development of soul due to attachments to worldly affairs.
He who mastered the true life when living on the Earth is not afraid of rhinoceros or tigers; in the battle he is not afraid of armed soldiers.
A rhinoceros has no place to plunge its horn into him, a tiger has no place to fasten its claws onto him, soldiers have no place to stab him with swords.
It is so, because to him there is no death."
-  Translated by Vladimir Antonov, Chapter 50 

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"The Source gives life and penetrates death.
Life is a companion to the four directions that exist within Heaven, Humanity and Earth.
Death is a companion to the four directions that exist within Heaven, Humanity and Earth.
People are born, live, and die, on earth, also as companions to the four directions that exist within Heaven, Humanity and Earth.
What is the purpose?
To give life.
To give life abundantly.
Indeed, we have heard of people who are good at sustaining life.
On land they travel and do not encounter rhinoceroses.
Tigers enter the battlefield and they do not need to wear armor or carry weapons.
Rhinoceroses have no place to butt with their horns.
Tigers have no place to put their claws.
Soldiers have no place to thrust their blades.
How can this be so?
Because of the not-dying Earth."
-  Translated by Alan Sheets, Chapter 50  

 

 

出生入死. 
生之徒十有三.
死之徒十有三.
人之生動之死地亦
十有三. 
夫何故?
以其生生之厚. 
蓋聞善攝生者.
陸行不遇兕.
虎入軍不被甲兵.
兕無所投其角.
虎無所措其爪.
兵無所容其刃. 
夫何故? 
以其無死地. 
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 50 

 

ch'u shêng ju ssu.
shêng chih t'u shih yu san.
ssu chih t'u shih yu san.
jên chih shêng tung chih ssu ti yi shih yu san.
fu ho ku?
yi ch'i shêng shêng chih hou.
kai wên shan shê shêng chê.
lu hsing pu yü hu.
ssu ju chün pu pei chia ping.
ssu wu so t'ou ch'i chiao. 
hu wu so ts'u ch'i chao.
ping wu so jung ch'i jên. 
fu ho ku?  
yi ch'i wu ssu ti. 
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 50 

 


Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 50 of the Tao Te Ching

 


chu sheng ru si.
sheng zhi tu shi you san. 
si zhi tu shi you san,
ren zhi sheng dong zhi yu di yi shi you san.
fu he gu?
yi qi sheng sheng zhi hou.
gai wen shan she shen zhe. 
lu xing bu yu hu.
si ru jun bu pi jia bing. 
si wu suo tou qi jiao.
hu wu suo cuo qi zhao.
bing wu suo rong qi ren.
fu he gu?
yi qi wu si di.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 50 

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"Men, in being born, emerge; in dying, they enter.
There are thirteen organs of life, the four limbs and nine openings.
There are thirteen causes of death: the departure of the three souls, the seven spirits, the vital force, the Yin and the Yang.
There are thirteen seats of death in the active life of men, the eight extremities of the compass and the five elements.
And why is it thus?
It is that the succession of births is a substantial property of Tao. 
Now I have heard it said that a man who understands how to protect his life will never meet with rhinoceros or tiger while travelling by land.
I he enters the army, he will not shrink from the weapons of the enemy.
Thus the rhinoceros has nothing for his horn to attack, the tiger has nothing on which to stretch his claws, the soldier has no use for his blade.
How is this to be accounted for?
It is that the man keeps out of the reach of death.
He never meets wild animals because he avoids their track; he is not slain in battle because he is brave, and does not fear the enemy."
-  Frederick Henry Balfour, 1884, Chapter 50

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"Anyone who is born dies.
If 13 people are born
All 13 people will eventually die.
From birth to life,
From life to death,
The great earth will afford the places to live and to die
for exactly 13.
Why is this so?
It is because the mind cherishes the belief
that living is a privilege and not a natural right.
I have heard that those who are good at conserving and preserving life
Seldom meet tigers and horned animals when they move around.
If they should join the military forces,
They would not have the need to combat.
Horned animals will have no way to cast their horns on their bodies,
Nor will tigers find a place to lay their claws.
Even soldiers' swords will not hurt them.
Why is this so?
Because such people will never die."
-  Translated by Lok Sang Ho, Chapter 50 

 

 

"Men come forth and live; they enter again and die.
Of every ten three are ministers of life to themselves; and three are ministers of death.
There are also three in every ten whose aim is to live, but whose movements tend to the land or place of death.
And for what reason?
Because of their excessive endeavours to perpetuate life.
But I have heard that he who is skilful in managing the life entrusted to him for a time travels on the land without
     having to shun rhinoceros or tiger, and enters a host without having to avoid buff coat or sharp weapon.
The rhinoceros finds no place in him into which to thrust its horn, nor the tiger a place in which to fix its claws,
     nor the weapon a place to admit its point.
And for what reason?
Because there is in him no place of death."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 50

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"Men go forth into life, And return in death.
Out of ten men, three prolong their life (through cleanliness), three hasten their death (through their excesses), three compromise their life by the attachment they have to it, (And only one stays alive until his term, because he is not attached to it).
He who is not attached to his life, does not turn aside to avoid an encounter with a rhinoceros or a tiger; he throws himself into the fray without armour or weapons;
And he comes to no harm because he is proof against the rhinoceros horn, the tiger's claws, And weapons of combat.
Why is this? ...
Because, exteriorized through his indifference, death cannot take a hold on him."
-  Translated by Derek Bryce, Chapter 50

 

 

"Those who leave the womb at birth and those who enter their source at death, of these;
   three out of ten celebrate life,
   three out of ten celebrate death,
   and three out of ten simply go from life to death.
What is the reason for this?
Because they are afraid of dying, therefore they can not live.

I have heard that those who celebrate life walk safely among the wild animals.
When they go into battle, they remain unharmed.
The animals find no place to attack them and the weapons are unable to harm them.
Why?
Because they can find no place for death in them."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 50  

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"People born into life enter death.
Constant companion in life
and in death,
this body is the kill-site animating their lives.
And isn't that because
they think life is the fullness of life?
I've heard those who encompass the whole of life
could walk on and on without meeting rhinoceros or tiger,
could charge into armies without feeling shield or sword.
A rhinoceros would find nowhere to gore them,
a tiger nowhere to claw them,
a sword nowhere to slice them.
And isn't that because
for them there's no kill-site?"
-  Translated by David Hinton, Chapter 50 

 

 

"It is natural for man to be born and to die.
And it is natural for each of his parts to be born and to die and to evolve through its life cycle.
Why do men become so perturbed and anxious to prolong the life of each part when endangered? The truth is that whatever is natural is good.
Since it is natural for man to die anyway, being assisted by horn or claw or spear in bringing about his death in no way endangers his nature.
No wild buffalo horn can change the course of Nature.
No tiger's claw can act unnaturally.
No soldier's spear can go against Nature.
Why?
Because death is natural, but Nature cannot die."
-  Translated by Archie J. Bahm, 1958, Chapter 50 

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

 

                                     

 

 

 

"We come into Life, we enter Death.
Three out of ten men follow the way of Life.
Three out of ten men follow the way of Death
Also there are three out of ten who live as men and yet they move on to the place of Death.
What a Master is he, therefore, who takes hold of life, of real Life!
He lives, his ears open to goodness, listening to hidden things.
In travelling, he fears not the rhinoceros nor tiger.
In entering the war-chariot, he dreads not the weapons of the soldier.
Can a rhinoceros with his horn strike the Inner Life?
Can a tiger with his claw tear the Inner Life?
Can a soldier with his weapon pierce the valley of Inner Life?
What a Master is he, therefore, who into the place of Death can bring his Inner Life!"
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 50

 

 

"To go out from life is to enter death.
The Knights of Life are thirteen;
The Knights of Death are thirteen.
And most men in living create thirteen vulnerable spots within themselves.
How is that?
Because they are so avid of life.
I have heard that he who has control of his life may walk throughout the land and meet neither tiger nor rhinoceros;
He may pass through a battle-field indifferent to weapons and armour.
For the rhinoceros would find in him no place to drive its horn;
The tiger would find no place to thrust its claws;
The weapon no place to insert its blade.
How is that?
Because such as he have no vulnerable spots."
-  Translated by Herman Ould, 1946, Chapter 50  

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   Translated by Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"The going forth is life: the coming home is death:

The followers of life, in every ten,

Are three!

In every ten, death's followers, again,

Are three!

In every ten the people who from life

Are moving to the place where death is rife,

Are three!

What reason can there be?

They live their lives in life's intensity.

 

But there is one, as I have heard it said,

So good in managing his living trust,

That he may travel far and never dread

Rhinoceros or tiger fang or thrust,

Or warlike host with garb and weapons red;

There is no spot in which to thrust the horn,

No place the tiger finds to fix his claws,

The soldier's weapon from its aim doth turn,

Now, why is this? Because

In him death finds no place of mortal flaws."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 50 

 

 

"Death might appear to be the issue of life,
Since for every three out of ten being born
Three out of ten are dying.
Then why
Should another three out of ten continue breeding death?
By use of sheer madness to multiply.
But there is one out of ten, they say, so sure of life
That tiger and wild bull keep clear of his inland path.
Weapons turn from him on the battle-field,
No bull-horn could tell where to gore him,
No tiger-claw where to tear him,
No weapon where to enter him.
And why?
Because he has no death to die."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 50

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"Men go forth from Life and enter into Death.
The Gates of Life are thirteen in number; and the same are the Gates of Death.
By as many ways does life pass quickly into Death. And wherefore?
Because men strive only after the Sensuous Life.
It has been said that one who knows how to safeguard Life can go through the country without protection against the rhinoceros and tiger.
He may enter into battle without fear of the sword.
The rhinoceros finds no place wherein to drive his horn.
The tiger finds no place wherein to fix his claws.
The sword finds no place wherein to thrust itself.
Why is this?
It is because he has overcome Death."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 50 

 

 

"Men go out of life and enter into death.
The parts (proportions) of life are three in ten, the parts of death are also three in ten.
Men that from birth move towards the region of death are also three in ten.
Why is it so?
Because of their redundant effort in seeking to live.
But only those who do nothing for the purpose of living are better than those who prize their lives. For I have heard that he who knows well how to conserve life, when travelling on land, does not meet the rhinoceros or the tiger; when going to a battle, he is not attacked by arms and weapons.
The rhinoceros can find nowhere to drive his horn; the tiger can find nowhere to put his claws; the weapons can find nowhere to thrust their blades.
Why is it so?
Because he is far beyond the region of death."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 50 

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

"Vivir es llegar y morir es volver.
Tres hombres de cada diez caminan hacia la vida.
Tres hombres de cada diez caminan hacia la muerte.
Tres hombres de cada diez mueren en el ansia de vivir.
Esto es porque viven sus vidas frenéticamente.
¿Cómo puede entonces sobrevivir el décimo hombre?
El hombre que sabe vivir
viaja sin temor a los búfalos y a los tigres,
y va desarmado al combate.
El búfalo no encuentra donde hincarle el cuerno,
El tigre no encuentra donde clavarle su garra,
El arma del enemigo no encuentra donde hundir su filo.
¿Por qué?
Porque este hombre desechó sus puntos débiles,
burlando así su destino de morir."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Capitulo 50

 

 

"Vivir es llegar y morir es volver.
Tres hombres de cada diez caminan hacia la vida.
Tres hombres de cada diez caminan hacia la muerte.
Tres hombres de cada diez mueren en el ansia de vivir.
¿Cómo puede sobrevivir el décimo hombre?
He oído decir que quien sabe cuidarse viaja sin temor al rinoceronte ni al tigre,
y va desarmado al combate.
El rinoceronte no encuentra donde hincarle el cuerno,
ni el tigre donde clavarle su garra,
ni el arma donde hundir su filo.
¿Por qué?
Porque en él nada puede morir."
-  Spanish Version Online at RatMachines, Capitulo # 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 50

 

Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español


Concordance to the Daodejing 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) and Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version.  From the Dao is Open website. 


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 50, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

                                            

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2014. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

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This webpage was last modified or updated on March 23, 2014. 
This webpage was first distributed online on May 2, 2011. 
 

 

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Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81