Chapter 28

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

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Chapter 28

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Simplicity or Purity or Natural State (p'u), Keep to the Female, Infant or Baby (erh or ying), Embrace Opposites, Be a Model, Returning to Simplicity, Tao, Honorable, Leave or Depart (li), Enough or Satisfied (tsu), None or No or Without (wu), Retaining Integrity, Harmony, Restore or Revert (fu), Injure or Harm or Cut (ko), Male or Masculine (hsiung), Always or Everlasting (ch'ang), Know or Recognize (chih), Female or Feminine (tz'u), Nature of Opposites and Change, Heaven (t'ien), Wood, Everlasting or Ancient (ch'ang), Carving, Sculpture, Act or Make (wei), Return (kuei), White or Pure (pai), Black or Defiled (hei), Keep or Hold (shou), Simplicity, Honor or Glory (kung), Ruling or Regulated (chih), Faulty or Fail (t'ê), Official or Magistrate (kuan), Opposite, Form or Rule or Example (shih), Complimentary, Yin, Yang, Limits or Extreme or Ultimate (chi), Valley or River or Receptive (ch'i), Holy Man (shêng jen), Scatter or Disperse (san), Possibilities, Open, Model, Great or Ruler (ta), Humility or Lowly Obscurity (ju), Power or Virtue (tê), Utensils or Vessels (ch'i),  反樸    


Términos en Español:  Simplicidad, Opuestos, Límites, Modelo, Ejemplo, Antiguo, Simplicidad, Siempre, Hacer, Honorable, Integridad, Armonía, Masculino, Femenino, Hembra, Dispersión, Hombre, Contrarios, Bebé, Infantil, Saber, Conocer, Cielo, Cambio, Receptivo, Madera, Talla, Mantener, Escultura, Cortesía, Blanco, Puro, Negro, Fallar, Final, Último, Contaminado, Restaurar, Posibilidades, Virtud, Potencia, Honor, Abierto, Magistrato, Gran, Regulado, Sabio, Santos, Valle, Suficiente, Utensilios, Lesionar, Cortada.

 

 

"Know the masculine,
but keep to the feminine:
and become a watershed to the world.
If you embrace the world,
the Tao will never leave you
and you become as a little child.

Know the white,
yet keep to the black:
be a model for the world.
If you are a model for the world,
the Tao inside you will strengthen
and you will return whole to your eternal beginning.

Know the honorable,
but do not shun the disgraced:
embracing the world as it is.
If you embrace the world with compassion,
then your virtue will return you to the uncarved block.

The block of wood is carved into utensils
by carving void into the wood.
The Master uses the utensils, yet prefers to keep to the block
because of its limitless possibilities.
Great works do not involve discarding substance."
-  Translated by J. H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 28

 

 

Know the masculine; cleave to the feminine.
Be the valley for the world.
To be the valley for the world,
   do not swerve from your innate nature
   and return to the state of infancy.
Know the bright; keep to the dull.
Be a guide for the world.
To be a guide for for the world,
   follow your innate nature without changing
   and return to the pre-conceptual.
Understand glory; keep to humility.
Be the valley for the world.
Innate nature completed, return to original uniqueness.

When original uniqueness is divided,
It then becomes the instrumentalities.
The Sage employs them,
They then become the officers.
Thus, subtle governance shapes not."
-  Translated by Cheng Man-Ch'ing and Tam Gibbs, 1981, Chapter 28

 

 

"Who knows his manhood's strength,
Yet still his female feebleness maintains;
As to one channel flow the many drains,
All come to him, yea, all beneath the sky.
Thus he the constant excellence retains;
The simple child again, free from all stains.

Who knows how white attracts,
Yet always keeps himself within black's shade,
The pattern of humility displayed,
Displayed in view of all beneath the sky;
He in the unchanging excellence arrayed,
Endless return to man's first state has made.

Who knows how glory shines,
Yet loves disgrace, nor e'er for it is pale;
Behold his presence in a spacious vale,
To which men come from all beneath the sky.
The unchanging excellence completes its tale;
The simple infant man in him we hail.

The unwrought material, when divided and distributed, forms vessels.
The sage, when employed, becomes the Head of all the Officers of government.
In his greatest regulations he employs no violent measures."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 28 

 

 

"Know your male qualities,
Yet know how to use the female abilities.
Be like a channel for the world's waters;
Open and flowing, like the mind of a child.
Full of virtue, harmony and excellence.
Know the light,
But understand the dark.
Be an example for the world.
Act with honor, and retain humility.
Return to the state of the uncarved wooden block."
-  Translated by Rivenrock, Chapter 28 

 

 

"Know the male,
yet keep to the female:
receive the world in your arms.
If you receive the world,
the Tao will never leave you
and you will be like a little child. Know the white,
yet keep to the black:
be a pattern for the world.
If you are a pattern for the world,
the Tao will be strong inside you
and there will be nothing you can't do. Know the personal,
yet keep to the impersonal:
accept the world as it is.
If you accept the world,
the Tao will be luminous inside you
and you will return to your primal self. The world is formed from the void,
like utensils from a block of wood.
The Master knows the utensils,
yet keeps to the the block:
thus she can use all things."
-  Translated by Stephen Mitchell, 1988, Chapter 28   

 

 

"One keeps weakness while knowing what strength is,
And serves as the humblest brook for the world.
Being the humblest, one can receive best
Until one returns to be the weakest infant.
One keeps black while knowing what white is,
And serves as a basic model for the world.
Being the basic model, one can receive properly
Until one returns to the oneness without polar opposition.
One keeps disgrace while knowing what glory is,
And serves as the lowest valley for the world.
Being the lowest, one can receive enough
To return to the most original simplicity.
Followed by people, this simplicity can shape the world
The wise use it as the example for the government.
The big system is, therefore, an indivisible simple whole.
-  Translated by Liu Qixuan, Chapter 28 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2016 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 


 


"Who his manhood shows
And his womanhood knows
Becomes the empire's river.
Is he the empire's river,
He will from virtue never deviate,
And home he turneth to a child's estate.

Who his brightness shows
And his blackness knows
Becomes the empire's model.
Is he the empire's model,
Of virtue ne'er shall he be destitute,
And home he turneth to the absolute.

Who knows his fame
And guards his shame
Becomes the empire's valley.
Is he the empire's valley,
For e'er his virtue will sufficient be,
And home he turneth to simplicity."

Simplicity, when scattered, becomes a vessel of usefulness.
The holy man, by using it, becomes the chief leader;
And truly, a great principle will never do harm."
-  Translated by Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki and Paul Carus, 1913, Chapter 28

 

 

"The first assignment for Daisetz "Great Simplicity" T. Suzuki in 1898 was to help Paul Carus with the Tao Te Ching.  Dr. Carus knew no Chinese, but he wanted this translation to a scholarly one and he had Suzuki supply a character by character gloss, as best he could, but Suzuki found himself unable to check Carus's use of Teutonic abstractions.  "The Chinese are masters in reproducing the most subtle changes in their innermost feelings," Suzuki wrote of his first collaboration with Carus, "thus, in order to translate passages from Lao Tzu, I had to explain to Dr. Carus the feeling behind each Chinese term.  But being himself a German writing in English, he translated these Chinese ideas into abstract conceptual terms.  If only I had been more intellectually equipped then," he thought later, "I might have been better able to help him understand the original meaning."
In order to supply a corresponding Chinese text, Suzuki cut out the Chinese characters from Chinese and Japanese books, and pasted them in the proper places on the manuscript pages, which where then reproduced photographically [and then printed in 1913]."
-  "How the Swans Came to the Lake," by Rick Fields, 1981, p. 139

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"Becoming
Using the male, being female,
Being the entrance of the world,
You embrace harmony
And become as a newborn.

Using strength, being weak,
Being the root of the world,
You complete harmony
And become as unshaped wood.

Using the light, being dark,
Being the world,
You perfect harmony
And return to the Way."
-  Translated by Peter Merel, Chapter 28 

 

 

"Knowing the excitement of proactivity, you settle for quietude.
Everyone will converge to you like water flowing towards the valley.
Thus, you are like the valley to the world.
Holding fast to the "absolute virtue" (Dao),
You try to return to the pristine innocence of an infant.
You know the benefit of the limelight, but choose to be anonymous.
You set this example for others to follow.
Holding fast to the "absolute virtue" unerringly,
You hope to return to the path of Dao.
Knowing the lure of fame and glory, you choose humility instead.
By your taking a low profile, everyone converges to you like water flowing towards the ravine.
Thus, you are the ravine to the world.
The "absolute virtue" is bountiful.
Finally, it returns to the naturalness of a raw timber.
The natural block once carved becomes useful utensils.
The sage utilises them as leaders.
The system set up by the sage should cause no harm."
-  Translated by Han Hiong Tan, Chapter 28 

 

 

"Know the male, but keep to the female and be thus a valley to the world.
When one is a valley to the world, the constant virtue will not desert one and one will return to the state of being an infant.
Know the white but keep to the black and be thus a model to the world.
If one is a model to the world, then the constant virtue will not decline and you will return to the limitless.
Know glory but keep to disgrace and so be a valley to the world.
If one is a valley to the world then constant virtue will be sufficient and you will return to the Uncarved Block.
When the Uncarved Block is cut asunder it then becomes utensils.
But should a Sage use such a man, that person would become a senior official.
Truly great fabrication does not involve cutting."
-  Translated by Patrick E. Moran, Chapter 28 

 

 

"Be aware of what's masculine in you,
But preserve what is feminine in you,
And serve as a conduit for the world.
When you serve as a conduit for the world
Your true virtue will never be gone.
And you'll return again to the state of a newborn child.

Be aware of what is bright in you,
But preserve what is dark in you,
And serve as a guide for the world.
When you serve a guide for the world
Your true virtue will never falter,
And you'll return again to the state of boundlessness.

Be aware of what's praiseworthy in you,
But preserve what is base in you,
And serve as a valley for the world.
When you serve as a valley for the world
Your true virtue will grow ample enough,
And you'll return again to the simplicity of uncut wood.

Divided, the wood becomes a rod.
Used by a sage, the rod becomes a ruler's staff.
A great ruler keeps things whole; he does not divide."
-  Translated by Agnieszka Solska, 2005, Chapter 28 

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"He who is aware of the Male
But keeps to the Female
Becomes the ravine of the world.
Being the ravine of the world,
He has the original character (teh) which is not cut up.
And returns again to the (innocence of the) babe.

He who is conscious of the white (bright)
But keeps to the black (dark)
Becomes the model for the world.
Being the model for the world,
He has the eternal power which never errs,
And returns again to the Primordial Nothingness.

He who is familiar with honor and glory
But keeps to obscurity
Becomes the valley of the world.
Being the valley of the world,
He has an eternal power which always suffices,
And returns again to the natural integrity of uncarved wood.

Break up this uncarved wood
And it is shaped into vessel
In the hands of the Sage
They become the officials and magistrates.
Therefore the great ruler does not cut up."  
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1948, Chapter 28 

 

 

 

A Chinese Language Version of Chapter 28 of the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
A note on my style of displaying the Chinese characters of the Tao Te Ching

 

 

知其雄, 守其雌, 為天下谿.
為天下谿, 常德不離, 復歸於嬰兒.
知其白守其黑, 為天下式.
為天下式, 常德不忒, 復歸於無極. 
知其榮, 守其辱, 為天下谷. 
為天下谷, 常德乃足, 復歸於樸. 
樸散則為器.
聖人用之, 則為官長.
故大制不割.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 28 

 

 

chih ch'i hsiung, shou ch'i tz'u, wei t'ien hsia ch'i.
wei t'ien hsia ch'i, ch'ang tê pu li, fu kuei yü ying erh. 
chih ch'i pai shou ch'i hei, wei t'ien hsia shih.
wei t'ien hsia shih, ch'ang tê pu t'ê, fu kuei yü wu chi.
chih ch'i jung, shou ch'i ju, wei t'ien hsia ku. 
wei t'ien hsia ku, ch'ang tê nai tsu, fu kuei yü p'u.
p'u san tsê wei ch'i.
shêng jên yung chih, tsê wei kuan ch'ang.
ku ta chih pu ko.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 28  

 

 

Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 28 of the Tao Te Ching

 

 

zhi qi xiong, shou qi ci, wei tian xia xi.
wei tian xia xi, chang de bu li, fu gui yu ying er.
zhi qi bai shou qi hei, wei tian xia shi.
wei tian xia shi, chang de bu te, fu gui yu wu ji.
zhi qi rong, shou qi ru, wei tian xia gu.
wei tian xia gu, chang de nai zu, fu gui yu pu.
pu san ze wei qi.
sheng ren yong zhi, ze wei guan zhang.
gu da zhi bu ko.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 28  
 
 
 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin and Wade Giles Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"He who, conscious of manly strength, guards a womanly weakness, becomes the channel of the whole Empire to which all minor streams converge.
Being thus the channel of the whole Empire, the cardinal virtues will never depart from him, and he will revert to a condition of childlike innocence.
He who, conscious of light, keeps in obscurity, will become a model for the whole Empire.
Being a model for the whole Empire, the cardinal virtues will never fail him, and he will revert to the Unconditioned.
He who, conscious of his glory, guards humility, will become the valley of the whole Empire.
Being the valley of the Empire, he will revert to his original simplicity.
When this simplicity is distributed, the man becomes a thing of utility to the State.
The Sage employs men of this simplicity, and advances them to high rank; therefore his administration is on a grand scale, and never comes to an end."
-  Translated by Frederick Balfour, 1884, Chapter 28 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"The Nature of Opposites and Change ...
Be aware of your masculine nature;
But by keeping the feminine way,
You shall be to the world like a canyon,
Where the Virtue eternal abides,
And go back to become as a child.
Be aware of the white all around you;
But remembering the black that is there,
You shall be to the world like a tester,
Whom the Virtue eternal, unerring,
Redirects to the infinite past.
Be aware of your glory and honor;
But in never relinquishing shame,
You shall be to the world like a valley,
Where Virtue eternal, sufficient,
Sends you back to the Virginal Block.
When the Virginal Block is asunder,
And is made into several tools,
To the ends of the Wise Man directed,
They become then his chief officers:
For "The Master himself does not carve."
-  Translated by Raymond Blackney, 1955, Chapter 28

 

 

"If you know your masculinity,
And maintain yourself to be female,
You will become the Valley for heaven and earth.
If become the Valley for heaven and earth,
You will be inseparable with the constant virtue (potency),
And you will returns to a new born baby.
If you know the white,
And comprise the black,
You become exemplary for heaven and earth.
If you become exemplary for heaven and earth,
You will never be against the constant virtue,
And will return to the infinite principle.
If you know your honor,
And embrace your disgrace,
You will be the Valley of heaven and earth.
If you become the Valley of heaven and earth,
You will be filled with the constant virtue,
And will return to the uncarved block.
If the uncarved block is cut into pieces,
It will become a vessel (specialist).
The sage employs it merely for a provincial governor.
Thus the great severing cuts no pieces.."
-  Translated by Eichi Shimomisse, 1998, Chapter 28

 

 

"Encompass the male but reside within the female.
In the world, be a valley,
a source of waters, pure:
an infant.

Know cleanness, but affirm even filth. 
The stream, but also the bank. 
The water and its channel.
The spring and the fall.
The origin and the outcome.

Gaze upon the white, but always from within the darkness
that has no borders. 
There you will find your essence.

The sage is not an official. 
The block of wood is not a tool.
The fabric is not clothing."
-  Translated by Crispin Starwell, Chapter 28

 

 

"Whilst developing creativity, 
also cultivate receptivity. 
Retain the mind like that of a child, 
which flows like running water. 
When considering any thing,
do not lose its opposite.
When thinking of the finite, 
do not forget infinity;
Act with honour, but retain humility. 
By acting according to the way of the Tao,
set others an example.
By retaining the integrity 
of the inner and external worlds,
true selfhood is maintained,
and the inner world made fertile."
-  Translated by Stan Rosenthal, 1984, Chapter 28  
 
 
Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2016 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"Balance thy male strength with thy female weakness and thou shalt attract all things,
as the ocean absorbeth all rivers; for thou shalt formulate the excellence of the Child
eternal, simple, and perfect.

Knowing the light, remain in the Dark.
Manifest not thy Glory, but thine obscurity.
Clothed in this Child-excellence eternal, thou hast attained the Return of the First State. 
Knowing splendour of Fame, cling to Obloquy and Infamy;
then shalt thou remain as in the Valley to which flow all waters, the lodestone to fascinate all men.
Yea, they shall hail in thee this Excellence, eternal, simple and perfect, of the Child.

The raw material, wrought into form, produceth vessels. 
So the sage King formulateth his Wholeness in divers Offices;
and his Law is without violence or constraint."
-  Translated by Aleister Crowley, 1918, Chapter 28

 

 

"Know the masculine,
but keep to the feminine:
and become a watershed to the world.
If you embrace the world,
the Tao will never leave you
and you become as a little child.

Know the white,
yet keep to the black:
be a model for the world.
If you are a model for the world,
the Tao inside you will strengthen
and you will return whole to your eternal beginning.

Know the honorable,
but do not shun the disgraced:
embracing the world as it is.
If you embrace the world with compassion,
then your virtue will return you to the uncarved block.

The block of wood is carved into utensils
by carving void into the wood.
The Master uses the utensils, yet prefers to keep to the block
because of its limitless possibilities.
Great works do not involve discarding substance."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 28 

 

 

"To know the masculine, to keep to the feminine, that is to be the brook of the world.
To be the brook of the world is to move constantly in the path of Virtue without swerving from it, and to return again to infancy.
To know the white, to keep to the black, that is to be the model of the world.
To be the model of the world is to move constantly in the path of Virtue without erring a single step, and to return again to infinite nothingness.
To know the glorious, to keep to the humble, that is to be the fountain of the world.
To be the fountain of the world is to live the abundant life of Virtue, and to return again to the uncarved block.
When the uncarved block stops being uncarved, it becomes useful vessels.
When the sage uses them, they become officials.
Hence, "A great tailor does not cut.""
-  Translated by Tien Cong Tran, Chapter 28 
 

 

 

"He who knows the male yet sustains the female will be a river valley for all under Heaven.
He who is a river valley for all under Heaven never separates himself from constant virtue and always reverts to the infant.
He who knows the white yet sustains the black will be a model for all under Heaven.
He who is a model for all under Heaven never deviates from constant virtue
And always reverts to the infinite.
He who knows glory yet sustains disgrace will be a valley for all under Heaven.
He who is a valley for all under Heaven is filled completely by constant virtue, for he always reverts to the uncarved block.
When the uncarved block fragments, it turns into implements.
As the sage would make use of them, he stands as chief of officials over them.
Thus the great carver never cuts."
-  Translated by Richard John Linn, Chapter 28 

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

 

                             

 

 

 

"He who knows the male (active force), yet keeps to the female (the passive
force or receptive element), becomes like a ravine, receiving all sort of things.
Being the all-encompassing ravine he knows a power that he never calls upon in
vain. This is returning to the state of infancy.
He who knows the white, yet keeps and cleaves to the black becomes the standard
by which all things are tested, he becomes the model for the world.
As such he has all the time the eternal power that never errs; and he returns to
the limitless, a primordial nothingness.
He who knows glory, yet keeps to obscurity or even cleaves to ignominy,
turns into the valley that receives into it all kind of things. And being such a
valley he has all the time a power that suffices. So he returns again to some
pristine simplicity, returns to the state of simplicity: its the raw, uncarved
block.
Break up simple awareness and it becomes shaped. Next it becomes someone's tool
in the hands of the wise man. For when a block is sawed up it's made into
subordinates or implements.
When the wise man uses it, it becomes chief.
So the greatest carver does the least cutting, as they say. The great ruler
doesn't cut up."
-  Translated by T.J. Byrn, 1996, Chapter 28

 

 

"He who while recognizing his manhood
Yet holds also to his womanhood,
Becomes a channel for all the world.
Being a channel for all the world,
Everlasting virtue will never leave him:
He goes back to the state of childhood.
He who knows the light that shines within him,
Yet veils himself in darkness,
Becomes a standard for the world.
Being a standard for the world,
Everlasting virtue cleaves to him:
He returns to the Never-changing.
He who, knowing honour, yet dwells in humility
Becomes a valley for all the world.
Being a valley for all the world,
Everlasting virtue will abide in him:
He returns to Wholeness.
This Wholeness when broken may produce many useful instruments;
But used by the Sage, it becomes the minister of ministers.
And truly, the Greatest Ruler interferes the least."
-  Translated by Herman Ould, 1946, Chapter 28 

 

 

"Know the male but keep to the female, and become the valley of the world.
As a valley, you have all your original powers, becoming like a baby.
Know the light but stay in the dark, and become a model for the world.
As a model, you have eternal power, returning to the beginning.
Know honor but stay humble, and become valley of the universe.
As valley of the universe, you are like uncarved wood.
When the wood is cut up, it becomes tools.
The sage uses the uncarved wood, and becomes a perfect tool.
Truly, the greatest carver does the least cutting."
-  Translated by Ned Ludd, Chapter 28  

 

 

"Return to Simplicity
Fan P'u


He, who knows the Male
And yet holds on to the Female,
Becomes the ravine of the world.
Being the ravine of the world,
He is always in union with Eternal Virtue,
And returns to the state of the new-born babe.
He, who knows the white (Yang)
And yet holds on to the black (Yin),
Becomes a model for the world.
Being a model for the world,
His Eternal Virtue becomes unerring,
And he returns to the Infinite.
He, who is aware of glory
And yet holds on to ignominy,
Becomes the valley of the world.
Being the valley of the world,
His Eternal Virtue becomes sufficient,
And he returns to the state of virgin wood (simplicity).
The virgin wood, on being cut up, is used as implements.
Sages, who make use of the implements,
Become high officials and leaders.
The Supreme Ruler uses the wood without cutting it."
-  Translated by Henry Wei, 1982, Chapter 28 

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

 

                                     

 

 

 

"To know manly strength, to guard womanly gentleness,
Is to be the central channel of the kingdom.
To be the central channel of the kingdom, always manifesting life, never guilty, is to return to the innocence of childhood.
To know light, to guard the darkness,
Is to be the model of the kingdom.
To be the model of the kingdom, always manifesting life, never at fault, is to return to the bounds of the Inner Kingdom.
To know glory, to guard humility,
Is to be the valley of the kingdom.
To be the valley of the kingdom, always manifesting life becoming perfect, is to return to a condition like undressed wood.
Undressed wood, being made into many utensils,
The self-controlled man uses them,
Then he becomes Ruler for a long time,
Thus he achieves greatness without hurt to anyone."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 28

 

 

"Know masculinity,
Maintain femininity,
and be a ravine for all under heaven.
By being a ravine for all under heaven,
Eternal integrity will never desert you.
If eternal integrity never deserts you,
You will return to the state of infancy.
Know you are innocent,
Remain steadfast when insulted,
and be a valley for all under heaven.
By being a valley for all under heaven,
Eternal integrity will suffice.
If eternal integrity suffices,
You will return to the simplicity of the unhewn log.
Know whiteness,
Maintain blackness,
and be a model for all under heaven.
By being a model for all under heaven,
Eternal integrity will not err.
If eternal integrity does not err,
You will return to infinity.
When the unhewn log is sawn apart,
it is made into tools;
When the sage is put to use,
he becomes the chief of officials.
For great carving does no cutting."
-  Translated by Victor H. Mair, 1990, Chapter 28

 

 

"The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Seeing who we are

By knowing the masculine, and keeping in touch with the feminine, we are of use to the world.
By being of use in the world, we are true to our original nature,
and we return to the innocence of a child.

By seeing our clarity, and also acknowledging our obscurity,
we serve as a model in the world.
By serving as a model for the world, our integrity is unimpaired,
and we return to our limitless nature.

Even when receiving praise, we remember our faults,
and are receptive to the world.
By being receptive to the world, our true nature is perfected,
and we return to our natural state.

When wood is carved, it becomes a mere tool.
When wise people are called upon to serve,
they become the ones in charge.
Thus the best principle is not to carve things up."
-  Translated by Roderic and Amy Sorrell, 2003, Chapter 28  

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   By Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"He who knows the masculine, and yet retains the feminine,

Will be the whole world's channel, being so,

Eternal virtue will with him remain forevermore,

And infant innocency to him go.

 

He who knows the spotless white, yet keeps the darkness of the night,

Will be the whole world's model, and the sage

Will hold eternal virtue in his hands forevermore,

And go home again to greet the golden age.

 

He who knows how glory shines, yet degradation never declines,

Will be the whole world' s valley, him alone

Will the spirit of eternal virtue fill forevermore,

And simplicity will claim him as her own.

 

This unwrought simplicity, when scattered comes to be

The universal vessels, and the sage

May use them as the rulers of the realm forevermore,

And every hurt and injury assuage."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 28 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Be familiar with Masculinity but watch over Femininity - and become the Valley of the World.
Being the Valley of the World, invariant Te will not leave you.
Turn back to being an infant.
Be familiar with what is pure and white but watch over what is dark and black - and become the Pattern for the World.
Being the Pattern for the World, your invariant Te Will be constant.
Turn back to being limitless.
Be familiar with what is praiseworthy but watch over what is disgraceful - and become the Valley of the World.
Being the Valley of the World, your invariant Te will be sufficient.
Turn back to being an Uncarved Block.
When the Uncarved Block is cut up then it becomes a government tool.
When the Wise Person instead uses it then it becomes head of the government.
Yes: A great carver does no cutting, a great ruler makes no rules."
-  Translated by Michael LaFargue, 1992, Chapter 28  

 

 

"Wer seine Mannheit kennt und seine Weibheit wahrt, der ist die Schlucht der Welt.
Ist er die Schlucht des Welt, so verläßt ihn nicht das ewige Leben, und er wird wieder wie ein Kind.
Wer seine Reinheit kennt und seine Schwäche wahrt, ist Vorbild für die Welt.
Ist Vorbild er der Welt, so weicht von ihm nicht das ewige Leben, und er kehrt wieder zum Ungewordenen um.

Wer seine Ehre kennt und seine Schmach bewahrt, der ist das Tal der Welt.
Ist es das Tal der Welt, so hat er Genüge am ewigen Leben, und er kehrt zurück zur Einfalt.

Ist die Einfalt zerstreut, so gibt es brauchbare Menschen.
Übt der Berufene sie aus, so wird er der Herr der Beamten.
Darum: Großartige Gestaltung bedarf nicht des Beschneidens."
-  Translated by Richard Wilhelm, 1911, Chapter 28 

 

 

"Herzenseinfalt die weltordnende Kraft

Wer kraftvoll in seinem Mannestum wurzelt
und zugleich empfänglich ist wie ein Weib:
in dem vermag das strömende Leben zu gründen.

Ist er das Strombett der Welt,
so werden die in seinem Selbst wirkenden Kräfte
ihn nie verlassen:
er kehrt zu des Kindes Ursprünglichkeit zurück.

Wer vom Licht der Erkenntnis durchdrungen
dennoch im Dunklen bleibt, wird zur Leuchte der Welt.

Ist er Leuchte der Welt,
wird er von des Lichtes Mächten nie verlassen:
er kehrt zum Urgrund des Lebens zurück.

Wer um seine innere Größe weiß
und dennoch bescheiden bleibt,
durch den vermag die Welt zu werden.

Wird die Welt durch ihn,
wird der quellenden Kräfte in ihm kein Ende sein:
er hat seines Herzens Einfalt wieder gefunden.

Breitet sich die Herzenseinfalt unter den Menschen aus,
so vermögen diese das Unergründliche wieder zu fassen.

Der Weyse setzt solche Menschen
als Vorgesetzte und Verwalter ein.

Durch solche Verwaltung wird die Welt unmerklich geordnet.

Echte Macht wächst aus sich selbst."
-  Translated by Rudolf Backofen, 1949, Chapter 28

 

 

"Know your masculine.
Maintain your feminine.
Act in Heaven below's (the sacred body) valley.
Act in Heaven below's valley.
The eternal action of the soul does not divide or separate.
Return and revert to your original state like that of a new born child.

Know your purity.
Observe your evil.
Become an example of Heaven below.
Become an example of Heaven below.
The eternal action of the soul does not falter.
Return and revert to the origin through the highest emptiness.

Know your beauty.
Observe your shame.
Act in Heaven below's empty spaces.
Act in Heaven below's empty spaces.
Eternal action of the soul is enough.
Return and restore the purity of uncarved wood or uncut jade.

Purity disperses and becomes the vessel.
The sage uses it and becomes an enduring leader.
Hence great rulers do no harm."
-  Translated by Alan Sheets and Barbara Tovey, 2002, Chapter 28  

 

 


 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2016 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"Know the male
But keep to the role of the female
And be a ravine to the empire.
If you are a ravine to the empire,
Then the constant virtue will not desert you
And you will again return to being a babe.

Know the white
But keep to the role of the sullied
And be a model to the empire.
If you are a model to the empire,
Then the constant virtue will not be wanting
And you will return to the infinite,

Know honour
But keep to the role of the disgraced
And be a valley to the empire.
If you are a valley to the empire,
Then the constant virtue will be sufficient
And you will return to being the uncarved block.

When the uncarved block shatters it becomes vessels.
The sage makes use of these and becomes the lord over the officials.

Hence the greatest cutting does not sever."
-  Translated by D. C. Lau, 1963, Chapter 28  

 

 

"Know the male,
yet keep to the female:
receive the world in your arms.
If you receive the world,
the Tao will never leave you
and you will be like a little child.

Know the white,
yet keep to the black:
be a pattern for the world.
If you are a pattern for the world,
the Tao will be strong inside you
and there will be nothing you can't do.

Know the personal,
yet keep to the impersonal:
accept the world as it is.
If you accept the world,
the Tao will be luminous inside you
and you will return to your primal self.

The world is formed from the void,
like utensils from a block of wood.
The Master knows the utensils,
yet keeps to the the block:
thus she can use all things."
-  Translated by Edwin Shaw, 1996, Chapter 28 

 

 

"He who, being a man, remains a woman, will become an universal channel.
As an universal channel the eternal virtue will never forsake him. He will re-become a child.
He who, being in the light, remains in obscurity, will become an universal model.
As an universal model the eternal virtue will not pass him by. He will go back to the all-perfect.
He who, being glorious, continues in humility, will become an universal valley.
As an universal valley the eternal virtue will fill him. He will revert to the first essence.
This first essence is that which, being differentiated, gives rise to innumerable vessels of life.
A wise man, by embracing it, becomes the wisest of governors.
A liberal government is that which neither disregards not hurts anyone."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 28 

 

 

"Celui qui connaît sa force et garde la faiblesse est la vallée de l'empire c'est-à-dire le centre où accourt tout l'empire.
S'il est la vallée de l'empire, la vertu constante ne l'abandonnera pas; il reviendra à l'état d'enfant.
Celui qui connaît ses lumières et garde les ténèbres, est le modèle de l'empire.
S'il est le modèle de l'empire, la vertu constante ne faillira pas en lui, et il reviendra au comble de la pureté.
Celui qui connaît sa gloire et garde l'ignominie est aussi la vallée de l'empire.
S'il est la vallée de l'empire, sa vertu constante atteindra la perfection et il reviendra à la simplicité parfaite au Tao.
Quand la simplicité parfaite le Tao s'est répandue, elle a formé les êtres.
Lorsque le saint homme est élevé aux emplois, il devient le chef des magistrats.
Il gouverne grandement et ne blesse personne."
-  Translated by Stanislas Julien, 1842, Chapter 28 

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

"Conoce la fuerza del hombre,
aunque conserva la suavidad de una mujer.
Sé la corriente del universo.
Siendo la corriente del universo,
La verdad y el no desvío se torna inocente
Como un niño pequeño.
Conoce el blanco, aunque conserva el negro.
Sé un ejemplo para el cosmos.
Siéndolo, cada verdad y no desvío
regresa al infinito.
Conoce el honor, conserva la humildad.
Sé el valle del universo.
Mientras seas como el valle del universo
la virtud eterna te colmará
y retornarás a la sencillez.
Al volver a la sencillez se regresa a lo primordial, al tronco en bruto,
y en manos del sabio, el tronco es convertido en utencillos.
Estos utencillos son funcionarios del sabio,
por eso el Sabio no destruye el tronco,
sino que lo convierte en herramientas útiles para el mundo."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Capítulo 28

 

 

"El que conoce el principio masculino y se mantiene conforme a` lo femenino
es como el profundo cauce del mundo donde confluye todo bajo el cielo.
Siendo el eje del mundo no deja la constante virtud y vuelve a su primera juventud.
Quien conoce lo luminoso, pero elige lo oscuro, se vuelve el eje del mundo.
Siendo el eje del mundo su poder es estable y no mutable, y sin moverse vuelve al estado primordial.
Quien conoce su gloria y sigue siendo humilde es el valle del mundo.
Siendo el valle del mundo, donde la virtud eterna es inagotable, realiza su retorno a lo informal.
Lo informal al dispersarse produce todas las formas.
Por eso, el sabio siendo señor de los vasallos preside el imperio en su conjunto y no se ocupa de detalles."
Translation from Logia Medio Dia, 2015, Capítulo 28

 

 

"Conoce lo masculino, manténte en lo femenino y sé elArroyo del Mundo.
Ser el Arroyo del Mundo es caminar constantemente por el sendero dela Virtud sin desviarse del mismo, y retornar de nuevo a la infancia.
Conoce lo blanco, manténte en lo negro, y sé el Modelodel Mundo.
Ser el Modelo del Mundo es caminar constantemente por el sendero dela Virtud sin errar un solo paso, y retornar de nuevo a lo Infinito.
Conoce la gloria, manténte en la humildad, y sé la Fuentedel Mundo.
Ser la Fuente del Mundo es vivir la vida fértil de la Virtud,y retornar de nuevo a la Simplicidad Primordial.
Cuando la Simplicidad Primordial se divide, se convierte en recipientesútiles, que, en manos del Sabio, se transforman en funcionarios.
Por ello, "un gran sastre da pocos cortes"."
 -  Translated into Spanish by Alfonso Colodrón from the English translation by John C. H. Wu, 1993, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo # 28

 

 

"Conocer al macho pero seguir a la hembra.
Ser el torrente del mundo.
Siendo el torrente del mundo
La naturaleza eterna no se separa,
Y una vez más se retorna al niño recién nacido.

Conocer lo blanco pero seguir lo negro.
Ser el modelo del mundo.
Siendo el modelo del mundo,
La naturaleza eterna no se modifica,
Y una vez más se retorna a la no-realidad.

Conocer la gloria pero seguir la deshonra.
Ser el valle del mundo.
Siendo el valle del mundo,
La naturaleza eterna se completa,
Y una vez más se retorna al bloque intallado.
El bloque intallado se dispersa
Para convertirse en utensilios que el sabio usa
Como convertidos en los oficiales del gobierno.

Por lo tanto las grandes instituciones no cercenan."
-  Translated by Álex Ferrara, 2003, Capítulo # 28

 

 

"Conociendo lo masculino, y convirtiendose en lo femenino,
Se llega a ser la vía a través de la cual se mueve el Mundo,
Estar unido a la virtud,
Y renacer de nuevo.

Conociendo la luz y convirtiendose en la oscuridad,
Uno se convierte en el Mundo,
Llegando a ser la virtud,
Y volviendo al Tao.

Conociendo el honor y siendo humilde,
Uno se convierte en el valle del Mundo,
Llenandose de la virtud,
Y siendo como un tronco no cortado.

Cuando el tronco es cortado se convierte en herramientas.
Usadas por el sabio, son poderosas;
Así pues, un buen carpintero no desperdicia madera."
-  Translated by Antonio Rivas Gonzálvez, 1998, Capítulo 28 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2016 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching

 

 

Next Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #29

Previous Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #27

Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 28

 

Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse.  Complete versions of all 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching by many different translators in many languages: 124 English, 24 German, 14 Russian, 7 Spanish, 5 French and many other languages.  Links are organized first by languages, and then alphabetically by translators.  Formatting varies somewhat.  The original website at Onekellotus went offline in 2012; but, the extensive collection of these Tao Te Ching versions was saved for posterity by the Internet Archive Wayback Machine and available as of 9/9/2015.  This is an outstanding original collection of versions of the Daodejing─ the Best on the Internet.  Caution: copyright infringement may sometimes be an issue at this website. 


Tao Te Ching, Translations into English: Terebess Asia Online (TAO).  124 nicely formatted complete English language translations, on separate webpages, of the Daodejing.  Alphabetical index by translators.  Each webpage has all 81 chapters of the Tao Te Ching translated into English.  A useful collection!  Many reformatted and colored versions from the original collection at Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse.  Caution: copyright infringement may sometimes be an issue at this website. 


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Tao Te Ching  Translated by D. C. Lau.  Addison Wesley, Reprint Edition, 2000.  192 pages.  ISBN: 978-0140441314. 

 

 

                                                            

 

 

The Taoism Reader  By Thomas Cleary.  Shambhala, 2012.  192 pages.


Change Your Thoughts - Change Your Life: Living the Wisdom of the Tao  By Wayne W. Dyer.  Hay House, Reprint Edition, 2009.  416 pages. 


The Tao of Being: A Think and Do Workbook  By Ray Grigg.  Green Dragon Pub., 1988. 204 pages.


The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons.  By Deng Ming-Dao.  New York, Harper Collins, 2013.  429 pages.  


The Classic of the Way and Virtue: A New Translation of the Tao-te Ching of Laozi as Interpreted by Wang Bi.  Translated by Richard John Lynn.  Translations from the Asian Classics Series.  New York, Columbia University Press, 1999.  Extensive index, glossaries, notes, 244 pages. 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Stoicism and Hellenistic Philosophy  


How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons 


One Old Philosopher's Notebooks  Research, Reading, and Reflections by Mike Garofalo.


Virtues and a Good Life


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Translators Index, Tao Te Ching Versions in English, Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions of the Chapters 


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español, Translators Index 


Concordance to the Daodejing


The Tao of Zen.  By Ray Grigg.  Tuttle, 2012, 256 pages.  Argues for the view that Zen is best characterized as a version of philosophical Taoism (i.e., Laozi and Zhuangzi) and not Mahayana Buddhism. 


Chapter 41 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6   Valley Spirit Center in Red Bluff, California.   Sacred Circle in the Gushen Grove. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching  Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Mind-Body Arts, Philosophy, Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu. By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching

Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2016. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

This webpage was last modified or updated on May 28, 2016.  
 
This webpage was first distributed online on February 24, 2011. 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2016 CCA 4.0

 

Michael P. Garofalo's E-mail

Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

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Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides


Cloud Hands Blog


Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Green Way Research

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

Bodymind Theory and Practices, Somaesthetics

The Five Senses

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons

Pleasures, Satisfaction, Desires

Grandmaster Chang San Feng

Virtues and a Good Life

Epicureanism

Qigong (Chi Kung) Health Practices

Valley Spirit Center

One Old Daoist Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

 

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