Chapter 49

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

Chapter 48     Chapter 50     Index to All the Chapters     Taoism     Cloud Hands Blog

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Chapter 49

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 


English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Sage or Saint or Holy Person (shêng jên), Humility, Constant or Fixed (ch'ang), Equality, Heart or Heart-Mind (hsin), Receptivity, Families or People (hsing), Trust, Act or Make (wei), Goodness or Excellence (shan), Honesty, Indulgence, World or Below Heaven (t'ien hsia), Harmony, Sincere, Honest or Trustworthy (hsin), Honorable, Unite or Harmony (hsi), Self-Effacing, Undifferentiated or Nebulous or Oceanic (hun), Mother, Nurturing, Virtue or Power (), Heartfelt, Neutrality, Equanimity, Wisdom, Calm, Kind, Faithful, Trustworthy, Child or Infant (hai), Peaceful, Leadership, Fatherly, Ruler, Simplicity,  任德

Términos en Español:  Sabio, Santos, Humildad, Igualdad, Receptividad, Confianza, Bondad, Honradez, Indulgencia, Armonía, Sincero, Honesto, Honorable, Modesto, Madre, Nutrir, Virtud, Sincero, Neutralidad, Ecuanimidad, Sabiduría, Calma, Amable, Fiel, Confiable, Niño, Liderazgo, Paternal, Gobernante, Sencillez, Constante, Fijo, Corazón, Familias, Hacer, Poder, Mundo, Unite, Armonía, Nebuloso, Universal.  

 

 

 

"The Wise Person has no Ego, he identify himself with the universe.
He is equally good with good or bad people.
His virtue is goodness.
He is equally honest with honest and dishonest people.
His virtue is honesty.
He sees everybody equally, living simply and in harmony.
He is like a mother with her children.
In his heart he keeps the whole world."
-  Translated by Octavian Sarbatoare, 2002, Chapter 49 

 

 

"The Complete Thinker has no interests of their own,
But takes the interests of the people as their own.
They are kind to the kind;
They are also kind to the not kind:
Kindness is Power.
They are faithful to the faithful
They are also faithful to the not faithful:
Faithfulness is Power. 
In the middle of the world, the Complete Thinker
is shy and does not brag.
For the world they keep their heart
in its largest state.
All the people try to listen and see:
The Complete Thinker acts without prejudice."
-   Translated by John Trottier, Chapter 49 

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"Sages never have a mind of their own;
they consider the minds of the common people to be their mind.
Treat well those who are 'good.'
Also treat well those who are 'not good.'
This is Goodness Attained. 
Be sincere to the sincere.
Also be sincere to the insincere.
This is Sincerity attained. 
Sages are self-effacing in their dealings with all under heaven,
and bemuddle their own minds for the sake of others.
The common people all rivet their eyes and ears upon them,
and Sages make them giggle like children!"
-  Translated by Jerry C. Welch, Chapter 49

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"The sage has no mind of her own.
She is at one with all of humanity.
Give to those who are considered good.
Give to those who are considered bad.
This is true oneness.
Trust those who are trustworthy.
Trust those who are not trustworthy.
This is also true oneness.
The sage is peaceful and harmonious;
but to the world she seems indifferent.
The world pays attention to her and listens to her
even though she resembles a child."
-  Translated by John WorldPeace, Chapter 49  

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons


                             

 

 

 

"The Taoist has no opinions
He simply listens, and acts
He treats those who are good as worthy
He treats those who aren't good as worthy, too
And so he finds their goodness
He gives those who are honorable his trust
He gives those who are dishonorable his trust, too
And so he gains their trust."
-  Translated by Ted Wrigley, Chapter 49

 

 

聖人無常心. 
以百姓心為心. 
善者吾善之.
不善者吾亦善之.
德善. 
信者吾信之.
不信者吾亦信之.
德信. 
聖人在天下歙歙, 為天下渾其心.
聖人皆孩之. 
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 49  

 

 

shêng jên wu ch'ang hsin. 
yi pai hsing hsin wei hsin.
shan chê wu shan chih. 
pu shan chê wu yi shan chih.
tê shan. 
hsin chê wu hsin chih.
pu hsin chê wu yi hsin chih.
tê hsin.
shêng jên tsai t'ien hsia hsi hsi, wei t'ien hsia hun ch'i hsin.
shêng jên chieh hai chih. 
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 49 

 

 

Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 49 of the Tao Te Ching

 


sheng ren wu chang xin.
yi bai xing xin wei xin.
shan zhe wu shan zhi.
bu shan zhe wu yi shan zhi.
de shan.
xin zhe wu xin zhi.
bu xin zhe wu yi xin zhi.
de xin.
sheng ren zai tian xia xi xi, wei tian xia hun qi xin.
sheng ren jie hai zhi.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 49 

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"The wise man has no fixed opinions to call his own.
He accommodates himself to the minds of others.
I would return good for good; I would also return evil for evil.
Virtue is good.
I would meet trust with trust; I would likewise meet suspicion with confidence.
Virtue is trustful.
The wise man lives in the world with modest restraint, and his heart goes out in sympathy to all men.
The people give him their confidence, and he regards them all as his children."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 49 
 

 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"The Sage has no decided opinions and feelings,
But regards the people's opinions and feelings as his own.
The good ones I declare good;
The bad ones I also declare good.
That is the goodness of Virtue.
The honest ones I believe;
The liars I also believe;
That is the faith of Virtue.
The Sage dwells in the world peacefully, harmoniously.
The people of the world are brought into a community of heart,
And the Sage regards them all as his own children."
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, Chapter 49 

 

 

"The sage's heart is not unchangeable,

He makes his own the people' s heart and will,

To those who are good I, too, will be good,

To those who are not-good I will be good still,

Virtue is ever good;

Those who are faithful I will meet with faith,

The unfaithful also shall have my good will,

Virtue is our faithhood.

The sage dwells in the world, with thoughtfulness,

But his heart flows in sympathy with all,

The people turn their eyes and ears to him,

And are to him his children, great or small."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 49

 

 

 

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Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"The Sage has no interests of his own,
But takes the interests of the people as his own.
He is kind to the kind;
He is also kind to the unkind:
For Virtue is kind.
He is faithful to the faithful;
He is also faithful to the unfaithful:
For Virtue is faithful.
In the midst of the world, the Sage is shy and  self-effacing.
For the sake of the world he keeps his heart in its  nebulous state.
All the people strain their ears and eyes:
The Sage only smiles like an amused infant."
-  Translated by John C. H. Wu, Chapter 49  

 

 

"The Saint has no fixed mind.
He makes the mind of the people his own,
"The good I treat well, and the not-good I also treat well; thus I obtain goodness.
Those of good faith I treat with good faith, and those not of good faith I also treat with good faith; thus I obtain good faith."
The Saint in All-under-heaven makes no distinctions; he makes his heart impartial towards All-under-heaven.
The people rivet their ears and eyes on him, and the Saint treats them all like infants."
-  Translated by Jan J. L. Duyvendak, 1954, Chapter 49  

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"The sage is never opinionated,
He listens to the mind of the people.
I am kind to people when they are kind to me.
I am kind to them even if they hate me.
Virtue - te - is its own reward.
I trust those who trust me,
I also trust those who have no faith in me:
What I give, I receive.
A sage is self-effacing and mindful of offence.
He sets himself as his own example.
How shall I treat you, my son?
Like a child."
-  Translated by Kwok, Chapter 49  

 

 

"The wise man hath no fixed principle; he adapteth his mind to his environment.
To the good I am good, and to the evil I am good also; thus all become good.
To the true I am true, and to the false I am true; thus all become true.
The sage appeareth hesitating to the world, because his mind is detached.
Therefore the people look and listen to him, as his children; and thus
doth he shepherd them."
-  Translated by Aleister Crowley, 1918, Chapter 49 

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

 

                                     

 

 

 

"The Heart of the self-controlled man is always in the Inner Kingdom.
He draws the hearts of all men into his Heart.
If a man is good, he blesses him;
If a man is not good, still he blesses him with the Blessing of Teh.
If a man is faithful, he is faithful to him,
If a man is not faithful, still he is faithful to him with the Faithfulness of Teh.
The self-controlled man dwells in the world.
Patiently and persistently
He brings the whole world into active community of Heart.
All men turn their ears and their eyes towards him.
They are all children of the self-controlled man."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 49 

 

 

"The sage has no invariable mind of his own; he makes the mind of the people his mind.
To those who are good to me, I am good; and to those who are not
good to me, I am also good; and, thus all get to be good.
To those who are sincere with me, I am sincere; and to those who are
not sincere with me, I am also sincere; and, thus all get to be sincere.
The sage has in the world an appearance of indecision, and keeps his mind in a state of indifference to all.
The people all keep their eyes and ears directed to him, and he deals with them all as his children."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 49 

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   By Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"The Sage’s heart is not immutable; he regards the people’s heart as his own.
The virtuous I encourage, or approve; the unvirtuous I would incite to virtue.
The virtue of the Sage makes others virtuous. 
The trustworthy I trust; the untrustworthy I would make trustworthy.
The virtue of the Sage engenders trust. 
When the Sage occupies the throne of the Empire, he is anxiously bent on making it all of one mind. The people all fix their ears and eyes on him; and the Sage treats them as his children."
-  Translated by Frederic Henry Balfour, 1884, Chapter 49

 

 

"The wise have no mind-set.
They regard the people's minds as their own.
They are good to people who are good.
They are also good to people who are not good.
This is the power of goodness.
They are honest to those who are honest.
They are also honest to those who are dishonest.
This is the power of honesty.
The wise live in the world peacefully and harmoniously.
The people share a common heart,
and the wise treat them as their own children."
-  Translated by Sanderson Beck, 1996, Chapter 49 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"The Sage has no self to call his own.
He makes the self of the people his self.
To the good I act with goodness;
To the bad I also act with godness:
Thus goodness is attained.
To the faithful I act with faith;
To the faithless I also act with faith:
Thus faith is attained.
The Sage lives in the world in concord, and rules ovet the world in simplicity.
Yet what all the people turn their eyes and ears to,
The Sage looks after as a mother does her children."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 49 

 

 

"A sound man's heart is not shut within itself
But is open to other people's hearts:
I find good people good,
And I find bad people good
If l am good enough;
I trust men of their word,
And I trust liars
If I am true enough;
I feel the heart-heats of others
Above my own
If I am enough of a father,
Enough of a son."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 49 

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 


"El Sabio no tiene intereses propios,
Hace suyos los intereses del pueblo.
Es bueno con los buenos
y también con los que no son buenos,
y así consigue que estos se tornen a la bondad.
Confía en el sincero
y también en los que no son sinceros,
y así consigue que estos se vuelvan dignos de confianza.
El Sabio vive en el respeto de todos.
Fusiona su mente con el mundo.
Las cien familias dirigen sus oídos y sus ojos hacia él,
Y él los educa como si fueran sus hijos." 
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Capitulo 49

 

 

"El Sabio no tiene intereses propios, pero hace suyos los intereses del la gente.
Es bondadoso con los que son bondadosos; también es bondadoso con quienes no lo son:
Pues la Virtud es bondadosa; también confía en los que no merecen confianza:
Pues la Virtud es confiada.
En medio del mundo, el Sabio es tímido y modesto.
En beneficio del mundo, mantiene su corazón en su estado impreciso.
Todo el mundo esfuerza sus ojos y oídos: el Sabio sólo sonríe como un niño divertido."
-  Translated into English by John C. H. Wu, Spanish version by Alfonso Colodrón, 2007, Capitulo 49

 

 

 

 

 

Next Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #50

Previous Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #48

Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 49

 

Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español


Concordance to the Daodejing 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) and Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version.  From the Dao is Open website. 


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles (1892) Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 49 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 49, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 


 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2015. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

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This webpage was last modified or updated on November 20, 2014. 
This webpage was first distributed online on May 1, 2011. 
 

 

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Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

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Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides

Cloud Hands Blog

Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

One Old Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

Comments, Feedback, Kudos, Suggestions

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles (1892) and Hanyu Pinyin (1982) Romanizations

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81