Chapter 30

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

Chapter 29     Chapter 31     Index to All the Chapters     Taoism     Cloud Hands Blog

English     Chinese     Spanish

 

 

 

Chapter 30

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu


 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Abandon Excess, Avoid Daring, Strike Only of Necessity, Be Wary of War, Maturity, Violence, Destruction, Crops or Harvest (nien), Battle, Dao, Peace, Old, Grow or Spring Up (shêng), Worn, Assist or Aid (tso), General, Minister, Actions or Affairs (shih), Arms and Weapons (ping), Dominate or Overpower (ch'iang), War or Battle (chün), Government, Force of Arms, Return and Rebound (huan), Necessity, Decay or Grow Old (lao), Mastery, Force or Strength (ch'iang), Arrogance, Thorns, Resolve, Army, Reconciliation, Briars or Brambles (ching), Encampment or Stop, Brag or Boast (ching), Resolute (kuo), Master and Ruler (chu), Force (ch'iang), Reason, End or Finish (yi), Flourish or Full-Grown (chuang), Misfortune or Calamity (hsiung), Tao, Death, Proud or Arrogant (chiao), Poverty, A Caveat Against Violence,  儉武  
Términos en Español:  Guerra, Madurez, Violencia, Destrucción, Batalla, Paz, Viejo, Usado, General, Ministro, Gobierno, Armas, Necesidad, Maestría, Arrogancia, Campamento, Florcer, Cultivos, Cosecha, Acabado, Crecer, Resuelto, Zarza, Armas, Negocios, Guerra, Espinas, Gobernante, Fuerza, Reconciliación, Razón, Alardear, Dominar, Desgracia, Muerte, Pobreza. 

 

 

"He who would assist a lord of men in harmony with the Tao will not assert his mastery in the kingdom by force of arms.
Such a course is sure to meet with its proper return.
Wherever a host is stationed, briars and thorns spring up.
In the sequence of great armies there are sure to be bad years.
A skilful commander strikes a decisive blow, and stops.
He does not dare by continuing his operations to assert and complete his mastery.
He will strike the blow, but will be on his guard against being vain or boastful or arrogant in consequence of it.
He strikes it as a matter of necessity; he strikes it, but not from a wish for mastery.
When things have attained their strong maturity they become old.
This may be said to be not in accordance with the Tao.
What is not in accordance with the Tao soon comes to an end."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 30 

 

 

"He who in harmony with the Tao would aid a ruler of men

Will not with warlike armaments strengthen the realm again,

But his manner of work, if requital came, would bring good payment then.

Wherever a martial host is camped, there thorns and briars grow,

And the track of mighty armies years of ruined harvests show;

The good commander is resolute to strike the decisive blow,

Then stops, for he does not dare complete and take by mastery;

Vain and boastful and arrogant the leader must not be,

But resolute, not violent, and from necessity.

When things have reached their highest pitch they became decrepit and old,

But this is not in accord with the Tao which Heaven and Earth enfold,

And what is not in accord, will pass away like a tale that is told."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 30

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

 

                             

 

 

 

"He who with Reason assists the master of mankind will not with arms strengthen the empire.
His methods invite requital. 
Where armies are quartered briars and thorns grow.
Great wars unfailingly are followed by famines.
A good man acts resolutely and then stops.
He ventures not to take by force. 
Be resolute but not boastful; resolute but not haughty;
resolute but not arrogant; resolute because you cannot avoid it; resolute but not violent.
Things thrive and then grow old.
This is called un-Reason.
Un-Reason soon ceases."
-  Translated by Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki and Paul Carus, 1913, Chapter 30 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"He who assists a ruler of men with Tao does not force the world with arms.
He aims only at carrying out relief, and does not venture to force his power on others.
When relief is done he will not be assuming,
He will not be boastful, he will not be proud;
And he will think that he was obliged to do it.
So it comes that relief is done without resorting to force.
When things come to the summit of their vigour, they begin to grow old.
This is against Tao.
What is against Tao will soon come to an end."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 10

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"Powerful men are well advised not to use violence,
For violence has a habit of returning;
Thorns and weeds grow wherever an army goes,
And lean years follow a great war.
A general is well advised
To achieve nothing more than his orders:
Not to take advantage of his victory.
Nor to glory, boast or pride himself;
To do what is dictated by necessity,
But not by choice.
For even the strongest force will weaken with time,
And then its violence will return, and kill it."
-  Translated by Peter Merel, 1962, Chapter 30 

 

 

以道佐人主者, 不以兵強天下.
其事好還. 
師之所處, 荊棘生焉. 
大軍之後, 必有凶年. 
善有果而已.
不敢以取強. 
果而勿矜.
果而勿伐.
果而勿驕. 
果而不得已.
果而勿強. 
物壯則老.
是謂不道.
不道早已.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 30

 

 

yi tao tso jên chu chê, pu yi ping ch'iang t'ien hsia.  
ch'i shih hao huan.
shih chih so ch'u, ching chi shêng yen.
ta chün chih hou, pi yu hsiung nien
shan chê kuo erh yi.
pu kan yi ch'ü ch'iang. 
kuo erh wu ching.
kuo erh wu fa.
kuo erh wu chiao.
kuo erh pu tê yi. 
kuo erh wu ch'iang.
wu chuang tsê lao.
shih wei pu tao.
pu tao tsao yi.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 30


 

Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 30 of the Tao Te Ching


 

yi dao zuo ren zhu zhe, bu yi bing qiang tian xia.
qi shi hao huan.
shi zhi suo chu, jing ji sheng yan.
da jun zhi hou, bi you xiong nian.
shan you guo er yi.
Sbu gan yi qu qiang.
guo er wu jin,
guo er wu fa,
guo er wu jiao.
guo er bu de yi.
guo er wu qiang.
wu zhuang ze lao.  
shi wei bu dao.  
bu dao zao yi.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 30  
 
 
 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization (romanization), English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character by Jonathan Star 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin and Wade Giles Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Dao De Jing Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

 

"Those who rule in accordance with Tao
    do not use force against the world
For that which is forced is likely to return―
Where armies settle
    Nature offers nothing but briars and thorns
After a great battle has been fought
    the land is cursed, the crops fail,
    the Earth lies stripped of its motherhood

A knower of the Truth does what is called for
    then stops
He uses his strength but does not force things
In the same way
    complete your task
    seek no reward
    make no claims
Without faltering
    fully choose to do what you must do
This is to live without forcing
    to overcome without conquering

Things that gain a place by force
    will flourish for a time
    but then fade away
They are not in keeping with Tao
Whatever is not in keeping with Tao
    will come to an early end."
-  Translated by Jonathan Star, 2001, Chapter 30 

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"Whoever advises a leader according to the Way
opposes conquest by force of arms.
The use of force tends to rebound.
Where armies march, thorns and brambles grow.
Whenever a great army is formed, scarcity and famine follow.
The skillful achieve their purposes and stop.
They dare not rely on force.
They achieve their purposes, but do not glory in them.
They achieve their purposes, but do not celebrate them.
They achieve their purposes, but do not take pride in them.
They achieve their purposes, but without violence.
Things reach their prime and then decline.
Violence is contrary to the Way.
Whatever is contrary to the Way will soon perish."
-  Translated by S. Beck, 1996, Chapter 30  
 
 
"He who by dao purposes to help a ruler of men, will oppose most conquest by force of arms:
such things are wont to rebound.
Where armies are, thorns and brambles can grow.
The raising of a great host could be followed by a year of dearth.
Therefore a good general effects his purpose and next stops; for he dares not 
rely upon the strength of arms, he doesn't take further advantage of a victory. 
He fulfils his purpose and does hardly glory in things he has done; effects his 
purpose and doesn't boast of a thing he accomplished.
Fulfils an ignoble purpose, but takes no pride in something he did well.
Fulfils his purpose as some perhaps regrettable necessity - does it as a step that could 
hardly be averted and avoided. 
So he effects his purpose, but hardly loves violence. Why?

Things age after reaching their prime. 
What has a time of vigor and conquest also has its time of decay. 
After things reach their prime, they begin to grow old, which means being contrary to Dao. 
Furthermore, morbid violence and violence in excess could be against Dao. 
He who is against the Dao perishes young. 
Whatever is contrary to Dao will soon perish. 
What's against Dao will hardly survive."
-  Interpolated by Tormod Byrn, 1997, Chapter 30 
 
Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
 
 
 
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander Simkins. 
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed  By Derek Lin. 
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony   By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life  By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook  Translated by Thomas Cleary. 

 

                             

 

 

 

"When leading by the way of the Tao,
abominate the use of force, 
for it causes resistance, and loss of strength,
showing the Tao has not been followed well. 
Achieve results but not through violence, 
for it is against the natural way, 
and damages both others' and one's own true self. 
The harvest is destroyed in the wake of a great war, 
and weeds grow in the fields in the wake of the army. 
The wise leader achieves results, 
but does not glory in them;
is not proud of his victories, 
and does not boast of them.
He knows that boasting is not the natural way, 
and that he who goes against that way,
will fail in his endeavours."
-  Translated by Stan Rosenthal, 1984, Chapter 30 
 
 

"There is an ancient way to lead
That just allows and does not force
For what goes out will come around
And violence will lead to wars

The one who sees completes a task
And stops when it is done
Seeing all is on its own
And not controlled by anyone

The seer sees that all is well
And does not need to please
Just gives acceptance everywhere
Puts everyone at ease"
-  Interpolated by Jim Clatfelder, 2000, Chapter 30 

 
 
 
The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"Those who use Tao in assisting their Sovereign do not employ soldiers to force the Empire.
The methods of government they adopt are such as have a tendency to react upon themselves.
Where garrisons are quartered, briars and thorns spring up, and the the land is deserted by the people.
Disastrous years inevitably follow in the wake of great armies. 
Wise rulers act with decision, and nothing more.
They do not venture to use overbearing measures.
They are decided without self-conceit, or boasting, or pride.
They are decided in spite of themselves, and without presuming on brute force.
After a man has arrived at the prime of his strength, he begins to age.
This is attributable to his not possessing the Tao. 
Those who do not possess Tao die before their time."

-  Translated by Frederic H. Balfour, 1884, Chapter 30

 

 

"When one who is an advisor to a person who wields power expresses Dao, he will recommend no need to use offensive weapons forcefully in the world.
That method shows that if you are endearing to others, they will treat you the same way.
Where an army finds a place to encamp, thistles and thorns are all that will grow there.

One who is kind will get results and then stop.
He doesn’t try to grab it all forcefully.
Getting results, and yet he won’t destroy anything in the process.
Getting results, and yet he won’t become arrogant.
Getting results, and yet he won’t lord it over others.
Getting results, and yet he won’t stop and bask in the glory of it.
This is correctly described as getting results without using force.
That method shows that if you are endearing to others, everyone will be increased.

A living thing may pretend to be stronger than they actually are, then they will age quickly.
This is correctly refered to as not being like Dao.
What is not like Dao will soon cease."
-  Translated by Nina Correa, 2005, Chapter 30 

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

 

                                     

 

 

 

"He who would help a Ruler of men by Tao
Does not take soldiers to give strength to the kingdom.
His service is well rewarded.
Where troops dwell, there grow thorns and briers.
After great wars, there follow bad years.
He who loves, bears fruit unceasingly,
He does not dare to conquer by strength.
He bears fruit, but not with assertiveness,
He bears fruit, but not with boastfulness,
He bears fruit, but not with meanness,
He bears fruit, but not to obtain it for himself,
He bears fruit, but not to shew his strength.
Man is great and strong, then he is old,
In this he is not of Tao.
If he is not of Tao
He will quickly perish."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 30 

 

 

"He who uses Tao to guide rulers
Does not force beneath-heaven with arms.
Such things recoil on their users.
Where armies are
Briars and brambles grow.
Bad harvests follow big wars.
Be firm and that is all:
Dare not rely on force
Be firm but not haughty,
Firm but not boastful,
Firm but not proud:
Firm when necessary,
Firm but non-violent.
Things that flourish
Fall into decay.
This is not-Tao,
And what is not-Tao soon ends."
-  Translated by Herrymoon Maurer, 1985, Chapter 30 

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   By Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"When one uses the Tao in assisting his sovereign, he will not employ arms to coerce the state.
Such methods easily react.
When military camps are established.
Briers and thorns flourish.
When great armies have moved through the land calamities are sure to follow.
The capable are determined, but no more.
They will not venture to compel; determined, but not conceited;
determined, but not boastful; determined, but not arrogant;
determined because it cannot be helped; determined, but not forceful.
When things reach their prime, they begin to age.
This cannot be said to be the Tao.
What is Not the Tao soon ends."
-  Translated by Spurgeon C. Medhurst, 1905, Chapter 30 

 

 

"If you would assist leaders of people
by way of the Tao,
you will oppose the use of armed force to overpower
the world.

Those who use weapons will be harmed by them.
Where troops have camped only thorn bushes grow.
Bad harvests follow in the wake of a great army.

The skillful person strikes the blow and stops,
without taking advantage of victory.
Bring it to a conclusion but do not be vain.
Bring it to a conclusion but do not be boastful.
Bring it to a conclusion but do not be arrogant.
Bring it to a conclusion but only when there is no choice.
Bring it to a conclusion but without violence.

When force is rlsed, youthful strength decays.
This is not the way of Tao.
And that which goes against the Tao
will quickly pass away."
-  Translated by Tolbert McCarroll, 1982, Chapter 30

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching: An Illustrated Journey   Translated by Stephen Mitchell

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"He who relied on the Tao to aid a ruler of men
Would not seek to conquer with weapons.
The man of Tao holds back from such instruments of recoiling violence.
For where armies have camped there spring up thistles and thorns;
And in the wake of marching armies follow years of drought.
Having achieved his aim, the good commander stops;
He does not venture to follow up his advantages with greater force.
He achieves his aim, but does not plume himself.
He achieves his aim, but is not boastful.
He achieves his aim but is not proud of what he has done.
He achieves his aim by means which could not be avoided.
He achieves his aim without violence.
For it is when creatures reach the climax of their strength that they start to grow old;
Thus violence runs counter to the Tao,
And what runs counter to the Tao is soon spent."
-  Translated by Herman Old, 1946, Chapter 30 

 

 

"A ruler faithful to Tao will not send the army to a foreign country.
This would incur calamity onto him, first of all.

The land where an army passed becomes desolated.
After war, lean years come.

A wise commander is never bellicose.
A wise warrior never gets angry.
He who can defeat the enemy does not attack.
He who achieved victory stops and does not do violence to the defeated enemies.
The victorious does not praise himself.
He wins, but does not feel proud.
He does not like to wage wars.
He wins because he is forced to fight.
Though he wins, he is not bellicose.

If man in the prime of life begins to weaken and gets ill?
This happens only because he has lived not in the harmony with Tao.
The life of such a person ends before a due time."
-  Translated by Mikhail Nikolenko, Chapter 30 

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

"Quien sabe guiar al gobernante en el sendero del Tao no intenta dominar el mundo mediante la fuerza de las armas.
Está en la naturaleza de las armas militares volverse contra quienes las manejan. 
Donde acampan ejércitos, crecen zarzas y espinos. 
A una gran guerra, invariablemente suceden malos años.
Lo que quieres es proteger eficazmente tu propio estado, pero no pretender tu propia expansión. 
Cuando has alcanzado tu propósito, no debes exhibir tu trifuno, ni jactarte de tu capacidad, ni sentirte orgulloso;
     más bien debes lamentar no haber sido capaz de impedir la guerra.
No debes pensar nunca en conquistar a los demás por la fuerza. 
Pues expandirse excessivamente es precipitar el decaimiento, y esto es contrario al Tao, y lo que es contrario al Tao
    pronto dejará de existir."
-  Translation from Chinese to English by John C. H. Wu, translated into Spanish by Alfonso Colodrón, Capitulo 30 

 

 

"Quien gobierna ateniéndose al Tao
no intenta dominar el mundo mediante la fuerza de las armas.
Está en la naturaleza de las armas militares volverse
contra los propios hombres que las crearon.
Donde se estacionan los ejércitos, sólo crecen después zarzas y espinos.
Durísimos años de hambruna de seguro seguirán a una gran guerra.
Así, el sabio busca el progreso de su pueblo,
y no el dominio de los pueblos vecinos.
Por eso no intenta conquistar por la fuerza.
Sin jactancia,
Sin obstinación,
Sin enriquecerse,
Ese es el método del sabio,
Porque expandirse excesivamente es precipitar el decaimiento,
y esto es contrario al Tao, y lo que es contrario al Tao
generará su propia destrucción."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013, Capitulo 30

 

 

 

 

Lao Tzu, Laozi

 

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Previous Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #29

Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 30

 

Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin romanization (Romanization) of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization (romanization), English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español


Concordance to the Daodejing


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles romanization (Romanization), and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 30 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6 


Das Tao Te King von Lao Tse  The largest collection of very nicely formatted complete versions of the Tao Te Ching.  The collection includes 209 complete versions in 27 languages, plus 28 Chinese versions.  There are 112 English language versions of the Tao Te Ching available at this website.  A variety of search methods and comparison methods are provided, as well a a detailed index.  {On 2/22/2013 I noticed that this website is no longer online.  They had some well organized public domain translations of the Tao Te Ching, as well as other useful text files and translations.}


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 30, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  660 pages. 


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings from the Oral Tradition of Lao-Tzu.  By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching

Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2011-2014. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

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This webpage was last modified or updated on January 13, 2014. 
This webpage was first distributed online on March 12, 2011. 
 

 

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Taoism: Resources and Guides

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Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81