Chapter 7

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

Chapter 6     Chapter 8     Index to All the Chapters     Taoism     Cloud Hands Blog

English     Chinese     Spanish

 

 

 

Chapter 7

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Eternal or Everlasting (ch'ang), Heaven (t'ien), Earth (ti), Humility, Body (shen), Self or Person (shên), Dimming Radiance, Selfless or Without Personal Concern (wu ssu), Indifferent, Restraint, Equanimity, Inner Life, Self-Produced, Behind or Last (hou), Spontaneous, Impersonal, Durability, Realization, Preserved or Remains (ts'un), Lasting or Ancient  (chiu), Preservation, Security, Front or First (hsien), Health, Enduring, Existence (ts'un), Life or Live (shêng), Sage or Wise Person or Saint (shêng jên), Longevity, Can or Able (nêng), Winning, Succeed or Accomplish (ch'êng), Intelligence, Universe, Cosmos,  韜光      

Términos en Español:  Eterna, Cielo,  Tierra, Humildad, Cuerpo, Persona, Ego, Resplandor, Desinteresado, Sin Preocuparse de Carácter, Personal, Indiferente, Restricción, Ecuanimidad, Vida Interior, Detrás, Espontánea, Impersonal, Durabilidad, Realización, Conservados, Duración, Antiguo, Conservación, Seguridad, Primero, Salud, Duradera, Existencia, Vida, Sabio, Longevidad, Capaz, Ganar, Lograr, Inteligencia, Universo, Cosmos.

 

 

"Heaven lasts long, and Earth abides.
What is the secret of their durability?
Is it not because they do not live for themselves
That they can live so long?
Therefore, the Sage wants to remain behind,
But finds himself at the head of others;
Reckons himself out,
But finds himself safe and secure.
Is it not because he is selfless
That his Self is realized?"
-  Translated by John C. H. Wu, Chapter 7   

 

 

"Both Heaven and Earth endure a long time.
The cause of their endurance is their indifference to long life.
This is why the subsist.
Thus the wise man, indifferent to himself, is the greatest among men, and taking no care for himself, he is nevertheless preserved.
By being the most unselfish he is the most secure of all."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 7 

 

 

"Heaven is eternal: the Earth is ever-renewing.
Why?
Surely it is because they do not live for themselves:
That is why they endure.
And so it is with the Sage.
He keeps himself in the background,
And yet he is always to be found in the forefront.
He is ever unmindful of himself,
And yet he is preserved.
Is it not because he seeks no personal success that all his aims are fulfilled?"
-  Translated by Herman Ould, 1946, Chapter 7 

 

 

"Nature is complete because it does not serve itself.
The sage places himself after and finds himself before,
Ignores his desire and finds himself content.
He is complete because he does not serve himself."
-   Translated by Peter A. Merel, Chapter 7 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance   By Alexander Simkins
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed   By Derek Lin
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony    By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life   By Ming-Dao Deng
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook   Translated by Thomas Cleary

 

                             

 

 

 

"Heaven is eternal, earth is lasting.
The reason why heaven and earth are eternal and lasting is because they do not live for themselves,
That is the reason they will ever endure. 
Therefore the wise man will keep his personality out of sight and because of so doing he will become notable.
He subordinates his personality and therefore it is preserved.
Is it not because he is disinterested, that his own interests are conserved?"
-  Translated by Dwight Goddard and Henri Borel, 1919, Chapter 7  

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"The Tao of Heaven is eternal,
and the earth is long enduring.
Why are they long enduring?
They do not live for themselves;
thus they are present for all beings.

The Master puts herself last;
And finds herself in the place of authority.
She detaches herself from all things;
Therefore she is united with all things.
She gives no thought to self.
She is perfectly fulfilled."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 7

 

 

"When living by the Tao, 
awareness of self is not required,
for in this way of life, the self exists, 
and is also non-existent,
being conceived of, not as an existentiality,
nor as non-existent.
The sage does not contrive to find his self,
for he knows that all which may be found of it,
is that which it manifests to sense and thought,
which side by side with self itself, is nought.
It is by sheathing intellect's bright light 
that the sage remains at one with his own self,
ceasing to be aware of it, by placing it behind. 
Detached, he is unified with his external world,
by being selfless he is fulfilled;
thus his selfhood is assured."
-  Translated by Stan Rosenthal, 1984, Chapter 7  

 

 

 
The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"Heaven is long-enduring and earth continues long.
The reason why heaven and earth are able to endure and continue thus long is
Because they do not live of, or for, themselves.
This is how they are able to continue and endure.
Therefore the sage puts his own person last, and yet it is found in the foremost place;
He treats his person as if it were foreign to him, and yet that person is preserved.
Is it not because he has no personal and private ends, that therefore such ends are realized?"
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 7   

 

 

 

A Chinese Language Version of Chapter 7 of the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu
A note on my style of displaying the Chinese characters of the Tao Te Ching

 

 

天長地久.
天地所以能長且久者.
以其不自生.
故能長生.
是以聖人後其身而身先.
外其身而身存.
非以其無私耶.
故能成其私.
-  Chinese characters, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 7  

 

 

t'ien ch'ang ti chiu.
t'ien ti so yi nêng ch'ang ch'ieh chiu chê.
yi ch'i pu tzu shêng.
ku nêng ch'ang shêng.
shih yi shêng jên hou ch'i shên erh shên hsien.
wai ch'i shên erh shên ts'un.
fei yi ch'i wu ssu hsieh.
ku nêng ch'êng ch'i ssu.
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 7

 


Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 7 of the Tao Te Ching

 


tian chang di jiu.
tian di suo yi neng chang qie jiu zhe.
yi qi bu zi sheng.
gu neng chang sheng.
shi yi sheng ren hou qi shen er shen xian.
wai qi shen er shen cun.
fei yi qi wu si ye.
gu neng cheng qi si.
-  Pinyin Romanization, Daodejing, Chapter 7  

 
 
 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin, German, French and English. 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Chinese Characters, Wade-Giles and Pinyin Romanizations, and 16 English Translations for Each Chapter of the Daodejing by Mike Garofalo. 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin and Wade Giles Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

 

 

"Heaven and earth are long lasting (chiu).
The reason why heaven and earth are long lasting:
Because they do not live for self (pu tzu sheng).
Therefore they last long.
Thus the sage puts his body (shen) behind,
Yet his body is in front.
He regards his body as external,
Yet his body remains in existence (ts'un).
Is it not because he is selfless (wu szu),
That he can fulfill himself (ch'eng ch'i szu)."
-  Translated by Ellen Marie Chen, 2000, Chapter 7

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

 

                             

 

 

 

"Heaven is eternal, the Earth everlasting.
How come they to be so?
It is because they do not foster their own lives;
That is why they live so long.
Therefore the Sage
Puts himself in the background; but is always to the fore.
Remains outside; but is always there.
Is it not just because he does not strive for any personal end
That all his personal ends are fulfilled?"
-  Translated by Arthur Waley, 1934, Chapter 7

 

 

"Heaven and earth will exist forever.
The reason they exist forever is that they do not live for themselves and they do not live because of themselves.
Therefore they live forever.
In the same way, the sage stays behind everything and finds himself in front of everything, he is not himself and he is preserved forever.
Since he has no self-interest, his self-interest can realize itself.
Even though it looks like heaven and earth give life to all creatures, they do not live in order to preserve their own existence,
and therefore they live forever and never die.
In his rule over the kingdom, the sage does everything for people, ignoring his personal goals,
and ultimately earns glory, honor, and everything he wanted for himself."
-  Translated by Chou-Wing Chohan, Chapter 7 

 

 

"The principle of initiation persists; and the principle of completion continues.
Why do such opposing principles persist?
Because they inhere in Nature, rather than stand by themselves.
That is why opposites endure.
The intelligent man, when an issue arises, stands off and observes both contentions.
Since he does not take sides, he never loses a battle.
By not favoring one side more than the other, he is able to appreciate the virtues of both sides."
-  Translation by Archie J. Bahm, 1958, Chapter 7  

 

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 
 
 
"Heaven and Earth can endure long.
If Heaven and Earth endure long,
It is because they do not live for self,
Therefore they can long endure.
That is why the self-controlled man puts himself last,
Yet he is found in the foremost place.
He regards his body as outside of himself,
Yet his body is preserved.
Is it not that his chief interest is in the Inner Life?
Therefore he can perfect his chief interest." - Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 7
 
 
"Heaven is endless, and Earth is durable. 
They are durable and endless because they do not take anything personally.  
The Sages therefore overcome their Ego-interests, and their Souls speak;
They do not think of themselves as their Egos, yet those remain present.
Being beyond their purely Egoistic motives, they can accomplish their goals."
-  Translated by Jerry C. Welch, 1998, Chapter 7  

 

 

"The universe is deathless,
Is deathless because, having no finite self,
It stays infinite.
A sound man by not advancing himself
Stays the further ahead of himself,
By not confining himself to himself
Sustains himself outside himself:
By never being an end in himself
He endlessly becomes himself."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 7 

 
 
 
Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 
 
 
"Nature continues long. 
What is the reason that Nature continues long? 
Because it produces nothing for itself it is able to constantly produce.
It is for this reason that the Holy Man puts himself in the background; yet he comes to the front. He is indifferent to himself; yet he is preserved.
Is it not because he has no interests of his own that he is able to secure his interests?" - Translated by C. Spurgeon Medhurst, 1905, Chapter 7
 
 
"The Tao is infinite, eternal.
Why is it eternal?
It was never born;
thus it can never die.
Why is it infinite?
It has no desires for itself;
thus it is present for all beings.

The Master stays behind;
that is why she is ahead.
She is detached from all things;
that is why she is one with them.
Because she has let go of herself,
she is perfectly fulfilled." - Translated by Edwin Shaw, 1996, Chapter 7
 
 
"Heaven is lasting and earth enduring. 
The reason why they are lasting and enduring is that they do not live for themselves;  
Therefore they live long.  
In the same way the Sage keeps himself behind and he is in the front;  
He forgets himself and is preserved.  
Is it not because he is not self-interested  
That his self-interest is established?"
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 7  
 
 
 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

 

                                     

 
 
 

"The universe is everlasting.
The reason the universe is everlasting
Is that it does not life for Self.
Therefore it can long endure.
Therefore the Sage puts himself last,
And finds himself in the foremost place;
Regards his body as accidental,
And his body is thereby preserved.
Is it not because he does not live for Self
That his Self is realized?"
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1955, Chapter 7  

 

 

"Der Himmel ist ewig und die Erde dauernd.
Sie sind dauernd und ewig, weil sie nicht sich selber leben.
Deshalb können sie ewig leben.
Also auch der Berufene:
Es setzt sein Selbst hintan, und sein Selbst kommt voran.
Es entäußert sich seines Selbst, und sein Selbst bleibt erhalten.
Ist es nicht also:
Weil er nichts Eigenes will, darum wird sein Eigenes vollendet?"
-  Translated by Richard Wilhelm, 1911, Chapter 7

 

 

"The universe is everlasting.
Not existing for itself, but giving life to all,
It endures forever.
Thus, the Sage -
- Remaining behind and in the background,
Finds himself ahead and in the foreground.
- Staying detached,
Finds himself at one with all.
- Being selfless,
Attains fulfillment."
-  Translated by Alan B. Taplow, 1982, Chapter 7 

 

 

"Heaven and Earth are mighty in continuance, because their work is delivered from the lust of result.
Thus also the sage, seeking not any goal, attaineth all things;
He doth not interfere in the affairs of his body, and so that body acteth without friction.
It is because he meddles not with personal aims that these come to pass with simplicity."
-  Translated by Aleister Crowley, 1918, Chapter 7  

 

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   Translated by Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"Heaven is enduring and the earth continues on,

Because it is not for themselves they live,

So the sage who keeps behind, the foremost place will find,

Who puts himself aside, for himself will best provide,

And unselfishly is able to achieve."
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 7 

 

 

 

 

 

"Heaven is lasting, Earth endures.
What enables Heaven and Earth to last and endure?
Because they do not live for themselves - so it is that they can live so long.
And so, the Wise Person: Puts himself last, and so finds himself in front.
He puts himself in the out group, and so maintains his place.
The personal does not exist for him.
Isn't this how he can perfect what for him is most personal?"
-  Translated by Michael LaFargue, 1992, Chapter 7  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

 

"Heaven and earth will pass away
but Infinity endures forever.
It had no beginning and so It can never end.
It is the inexhaustible essence of all things.
Because the sage remains behind
in her oneness with all things,
she anticipates all manifestations.
Being at one with Infinity,
she is indifferent.
Because she does not distinguish herself from
other beings,
she is completely fulfilled."
-  Translated by John Worldpeace, Chapter 7  

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

 

 

"Heaven is everlasting; Earth endures.
The reason of the endurance of Heaven and Earth is that they were not self-produced.
Therefore it is that they are able to endure for ever.
Thus, though the Sage in imitation of them regards the cultivation of his body as of secondary importance.
His his body still progresses of its own accord.
He he discards his body, and yet his body is preserved.
Is not this because he has no selfishness?
Wherefore he is able to realize all his wishes."
-  Translated by Frederic Henry Balfour, 1884, Chapter 7  

 

 

"The universe is everlasting.
The reason the universe is everlasting
Is that it does not life for Self.
Therefore it can long endure.
Therefore the Sage puts himself last,
And finds himself in the foremost place;
Regards his body as accidental,
And his body is thereby preserved.
Is it not because he does not live for Self
That his Self is realized?"
-  Translated by Lin Yutang, 1955, Chapter 7

 

 

"Heaven endures and earth is lasting.
And why can heaven and earth endure and be lasting?
Because they do not live for themselves.
On that account can they endure.
Therefore, the holy man puts his person behind and his person comes to the front.
He surrenders his person and his person is preserved.
Is it not because he seeks not his own?
For that reason he can accomplish his own."
-  Translated by Paul Carus and D.T. Suzuki, 1913, Chapter 7

 

 

"Le ciel et la terre ont une durée éternelle.
S'ils peuvent avoir une durée éternelle, c'est parce qu'ils ne vivent pas pour eux seuls.
C'est pourquoi ils peuvent avoir une durée éternelle.
De là vient que le saint homme se met après les autres, et il devient le premier.
Il se dégage de son corps, et son corps se conserve.
N'est-ce pas qu'il n'a point d'intérêt privés?
C'est pourquoi il peut réussir dans ses intérêts privés."
-  Translated by Stanislas Julien, 1842, Chapter 7  

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

"El cielo y la tierra son eternos.
El cielo y la tierra deben su eterna duración
a que no hacen de sí mismos
la razón de su existencia.
Por ello son eternos.
El sabio queda atrás, por lo mismo es el primero.
Está desapegado, por eso es uno con todo.
A través de sus acciones generosas logra la plenitud."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013,
Capítulo 7

 

 

"La Naturaleza es eterna debido a que carece de conciencia de sí misma.
De este modo, el sabio:
Se sirve a si mismo en último lugar, y se encuentra atendido;
Observa a su cuerpo como accidental, y encuentra que resiste.
Debido a que no atiende a su Ego, éste se encuentra satisfecho."
-  Translated by Antonio Rivas Gonzálvez, 1998,
Capítulo 7 

 

 

"El cielo dura eternamente, la tierra permanece.
Eternos y permanentes porque no viven para sí mismos.
Por eso son eternos y duraderos.
Es así que el hombre sabio al ponerse en el último lugar, es el primero.
No pensando en sí mismo, se mantiene.
No buscando su bien, lo realiza."
Translation from Logia Medio Dia, 2015, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 7 


 

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

 

Lao Tzu, Laozi

 

 

Next Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #8

Previous Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #6

Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching 

 

 
 
 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 7

 

Tao Te Ching Translations OnlineTerebess Asia Online.  124 nicely formatted complete English language translations, on separate webpages, of the Daodejing.  Alphabetical index by translators.  Each webpage has all 81 chapters of the Tao Te Ching translated into English.  An outstanding collection─ the Best on the Internet. 


Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español


Concordance to the Daodejing


The Tao of Zen.  By Ray Grigg.  Tuttle, 2012, 256 pages.  Argues for the view that Zen is best characterized a version of philosophical Taoism (i.e., Laozi and Zhuangzi) and not Mahayana Buddhism. 


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 7 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Tao Te Ching English Translations from Terebess Asia Online.  Over 30 translations. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 7, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2010-2015. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

This webpage was last modified or updated on July 29, 2015.   

This webpage was first distributed online on November 8, 2010. 
 

 

Michael P. Garofalo's E-mail

Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

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Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides

Cloud Hands Blog

Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

Bodymind Theory and Practices, Somaesthetics

The Five Senses

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons

Grandmaster Chang San Feng

Virtues

Qigong (Chi Kung) Health Practices

One Old Daoist Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

Comments, Feedback, Kudos

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

 

 

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81