Chapter 4

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing)
Classic of the Way and Virtue



By Lao Tzu (Laozi)


Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California

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Chapter 4

Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu

 

 

English and Chinese (Wade-Giles) Terms:  Emptiness or Void or Vacant (ch'ung), Tranquil, Nature, Knots or Tangled (fên), Infinite, Tao, The Ten Thousand Things (wan wu), The Ancestor (tsung) of All Things, God (ti), Lord, Order, Likely or Apparently or Perhaps (huo), Chaos, Sharp, Uniting, Birth, Sharpness or Point (jui), Primeval, Great Obscurity, Untangles Knots, Deep Pool, Child or Offspring (tzu), Universe, Identify or Unite (t'ung), First Born, Timeless, Dust, Dao, Fathomless or Profound or Vast (yüan), Appearance, Creative, Used or Applied (yung), Parentless, Bottomless, Totality, Origin, Harmonize or Blend (ho), Cosmos, First Cause, Ocean, Lord of Heaven or Creator or God (ti), Dust or Common (ch'ên), Noumenon, Thing In Itself, Images or Reflections (hsiang), Resembles or Like or As If (ssu), Permanent, Continuing or Enduring (ts'un), Dulls or Blunts (ts'o), Brightness or Light (kuang), Exhausted or Depleted (ying), Precede or Antecedent (hsien), Hidden, Know (chih), Vessel, Loosen or Unravel or Untangle (chien), Eternal, Earth, Deep or Dark or Serene (chan),  無源  


Términos en Español:  Vacío, Vacante, Hueco, Vacuo, Tranquilidad, Naturaleza, Nudos, Enredado, Complicado, Infinito, Las Diez mil Cosas, Antepasado, Dios, Señor, Orden, Probable, Parecer, Caos, Sostenido, Uniendo, Nacimiento, Definición, Primitivo, Gran Oscuridad, Submarino, Niño, Universo, Identificar, Sin Tiempo, Polvo, Insondable, Profunda, Apariencia, Creativo, Sin Padres, Sin Fondo, Totalidad, Origen, Armonizar, Mezcla, Cosmos, Primera Causa, Océano, Dioses, Noumenon, Imágenes, Reflexiones, Permanente, Continua, Duradera, Desafila, Brillo, Luz, Agotado, Empobrecido, Precedan, Antecedente, Oculto, Saber, Embarcación, Aflojar, Eterno, Tierra, Oscuro, Sereno. 

 

 

"The Dao appears to be emptiness but it is never exhausted.
Oh, it is profound!
It appears to have preceded everything.
It dulls its own sharpness, unravels its own fetters, softens its own brightness, identifies itself with its own dust.
Oh, it is tranquil!
It appears infinite.
I do not know from what it proceeds.
It even appears to be antecedent to the Lord."
-  Translated by Dwight Goddard and Henri Borel, 1919, Chapter 4      

 

 

"The Tao is an inexhaustible container, as much of itself that it pours out, still there is more left.
It blunts the sharpness, untangles the knots and softens the glare.
Its depths are hidden, universal and eternal.
I don't know where it came from,
It existed before the beginning."
-  Translated by John Dicus, 2002, Chapter 4  

 

 

"The Tao is full, exhaustless and complete; yet in operation as though not self-elated.
In its origin it is as it were the Ancestor of All Things.
It chastens asperity; it unravels confusion; it moderates the radiance,
And and it identifies itself with the sordid ones of the earth.
It enables a man to associate with the base without being defiled.
Pellucid like a spreading ocean, it yet has the semblance of permanence.
I know not whose offspring it is.
Its ειδωλον existed before God was."
-  Translated by Frederic H. Balfour, 1884, Chapter 4 

 

 

"Tao is empty- its use never exhausted.
Bottomless - the origin of all things.
It blunts sharp edges, Unties knots, Softens glare, Becomes one with the dusty world.
Deeply subsistent -
I don't know whose child it is. It is older than the Ancestor."
-  Translated by Stephen Addis, 1993, Chapter 4

 

 

"The Tao is the empty space of a vessel,
Yet, when used,
Never brims over.
How deep,
Like the ten thousand things' progenitor!
It files its sharpness,
Unravels its entanglements,
Softens its brightness,
And mingles with the dust.
How transparent,
As if existing!
I do not know whose son it was;
Seemed to precede the Emperor."
-  Translated by Chichung Huang, Chapter 4  

 

 

"Source Non-Existent
Wu Yuan


Tao is hollow, yet its utility
Seems unlikely to reach the limit.
Profound indeed it is;
It seems to be the fount of all things.
It blunts the sharp;
It unravels the tangled;
It harmonizes with the light;
It mingles with the dust.
Calm like a deep pool it seems to remain.
I do not know whose son it is.
It apparently antecedes the Creator."
-  Translated by Henry Wei, 1982, Chapter 4 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living  Translated by Eva Wong
The Daodejing of Laozi   Translated by Philip Ivahoe 
Daoism: A Beginner's Guide   By James Miller
Early Daoist Scriptures  Translated by Stephen Bokencamp
Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance  By Alexander and Annellen Simpkins
Practical Taoism  Translated by Thomas Cleary
Daoism and Chinese Culture  By Livia Kohn

 

                                       

 

 

 

"Tao, when put in use for its hollowness is not likely to be filled.
In its profundity it seems to be the origin of all things.
In its depth it seems ever to remain.
I do not know whose offspring it is;
But it looks like the predecessor of Nature."
-  Translated by Ch'u Ta-Kao, 1904, Chapter 4 


Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

"Tao is without limitation; its depth is the source of whatsoever is.
It makes shard things round, it brings order out of chaos, it obscures the brilliant, it is wholly without attachment.
I do not know who gave it birth; it is more ancient than God."
-  Translated by Walter Gorn Old, 1904, Chapter 4 

 

 

"Tao floods, never over flow, we use it,
As a stream, as the source of everything.
Blunt the sharp,
Untangle the knotted,
Soften the glare,
Merge with dust.
Hidden, yet seemingly present!
I do not know from whence it comes.
Forefather of gods."
-  Translated by Tienzen Gong, Chapter 4 

 

 

"Empty of all doctrines,
The Tao is wisdom eternally inexhaustible.
Fathomless for the mere intellect,
The Tao is the law wherewith all things come into being.
It blunts the edges of the intellect,
Untangles the knots of the mind,
Softens the glare of thinking,
And settles the dust of thought.
Transparent yet invisible,
The Tao exists like deep pellucid water.
Its origin is unknown,
For it existed before Heaven and Earth."
-  Translated by Yasuhiku Genku Kimura, Chapter 4 

 

 

"The Way is full: use won’t empty it.
Deep is the matrix of the myriad creatures.
Blunt the sharp:
Loosen the knots:
Dim the glare:
Follow old tracks.
Shadowy, it seems hardly there.
I don’t know whose child it is.
It seems like the ancestral form."
-  Translated by A. S. Kline, 2003, Chapter 4 

 

 

 
Simple Taoism: A Guide to Living in Balance   By Alexander Simkins
The Tao of Daily Life: The Mysteries of the Orient Revealed   By Derek Lin
Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony    By Ming-Dao Deng. 
Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices
The Tao of Pooh   By Benjamin Hoff. 
Scholar Warrior: An Introduction to the Tao in Everyday Life   By Ming-Dao Deng
Vitality, Energy, Spirit: A Taoist Sourcebook   Translated by Thomas Cleary

 

                             

 

 

 

"The Tao is like the emptiness of a vessel; and in our employment of it we must be on our guard against all fullness.
How deep and unfathomable it is, as if it were the Honored Ancestor of all things! 
We should blunt our sharp points, and unravel the complications of things;
We should temper our brightness, and bring ourselves into agreement with the obscurity of others.
How pure and still the Tao is, as if it would ever so continue!  
I do not know whose son it is. It might appear to have been before God."
-  Translated by James Legge, 1891, Chapter 4 

 

 

道沖而用之或不盈. 
淵兮似萬物之宗.
挫其銳.
解其紛.
和其光同其塵.
湛兮似或存.
吾不知誰之子.
象帝之先.
-  Chinese characters, Chapter 4, Tao Te Ching

 

 

tao ch'ung erh yung chih huo pu ying.
yüan hsi ssu wan wu chih tsung. 
ts'o ch'i jui.
chieh ch'i fên.
ho ch'i kuang t'ung ch'i ch'ên.
chan hsi ssu huo ts'un.
wu pu chih shui chih tzu. 
hsiang ti chih hsien. 
-  Wade-Giles Romanization, Chapter 4, Tao Te Ching

 


Audio Version in Chinese of Chapter 4 of the Tao Te Ching

 


dao chang er yong zhi huo bu ying. 
yuan xi si wan wu zhi zong. 
cuo qi rui.
jie qi fen. 
he qi guang tong qi chen. 
zhan xi si huo cun. 
wu bu zhi shui zhi zi.
xiang di zhi xian. 
Pinyin Romanization, Chapter 4, Daodejing

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English (includes a word by word key) from YellowBridge

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 

Laozi Daodejing: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin, German, French and English.  Excellent! 

Chinese and English Dictionary, MDGB

Chinese Character Dictionary

Dao De Jing Wade-Giles Concordance by Nina, Dao is Open

Dao De Jing English and Wade-Giles Concordance by Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization with Chinese characters, WuWei Foundation

Tao Te Ching in Pinyin Romanization

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters and English

Tao Te Ching: English translation, Word by Word Chinese and English, and Commentary, Center Tao by Carl Abbott

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, English, Word by word analysis, Zhongwen

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters: Big 5 Traditional and GB Simplified

Convert from Pinyin to Wade Giles to Yale Romanizations of Words and Terms: A Translation Tool from Qi Journal

Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin and Wade Giles Romanization spellings, English; a word for word translation of the Guodian Laozi Version. 

Lao Zi's Dao De Jing: A Matrix Translation with Chinese Text by Bradford Hatcher. 

Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star. 

 

 

"The Tao is empty, yet when applied it is never exhausted.
So deep it is, it seems to be the ancestor of all things.
Blunting sharp edges, resolving confusions,
Diffusing glare, uniting the world:
Such depth, something seems to exist there.
I do not know whose child it is.
It seems to have existed before the Ancestor."
-  Translated by Tam C. Gibbs, 1981, Chapter 4  

 

 

"Tao is a vast immeasurable void.
It can be used to infinity; it is truly inexhaustible.

Like nature, it appears to be the origin of everything.
In it, conflicts (sharp edges) are satisfied (rounded);
differences (tangles) are resolved (united);
observations (light) are clarified (tempered);
disturbances (turmoil) are quieted (submerged).

It is like a deep, dark pool. I do not know its source.
It is like a prelude to nature, a preface to God."
-  Translated by Frank J. MacHovec, 1962, Chapter 4 

 

 

The Complete Works of Lao Tzu: Tao Teh Ching & Hua Hu Ching   Translation and elucidation by Hua Ching Ni
The Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu   Translated by Brian Walker
Tao Te Ching  Translated by Arthur Waley
Tao - The Way   Translated by Lionel and and Herbert Giles
Taoism: An Essential Guide   By Eva Wong

 

                             

 

 

 

"Existence, by nothing bred,
Breeds everything.
Parent of the universe,
It smoothes rough edges,
Unties hard knots,
Tempers the sharp sun,
Lays blowing dust,
Its image in the wellspring never fails.
But how was it conceived?--this image
Of no other sire."
-  Translated by Witter Bynner, 1944, Chapter 4 

 

 

"Tao is empty, used yet never filled.
It is deep, like the forefather of all things.
It dulls sharpness, and sorts tangles,
Blends with the light, becoming one with the dust.
So serene, as if it hardly existed.
I do not know whose son it is.
It seems to have preceded God."
-  Translated by Paul J. Lin, Chapter 4  

 

 

"Atheism is an empty bowl:
it cannot be filled
neither does it need filling.
It is at the beginning of all human consciousness
and is even the origin of theism.
Soften the sharpness
stop the debate
dissolve the confusion
reduce the glare
become like dust.

Like a spring-fed pool in a quiet forest
it has no bottom
no beginning
no end.

Is atheism born from theism?
No one knows.
But it is
the natural state
of all being."
-  Translated by Tom Kunesh, Chapter 4

 

 

"The way is empty, yet use will not drain it.
Deep, it is like the ancestor of the myriad creatures.
Blunt the sharpness;
Untangle the knots;
Soften the glare;
Let your wheels move only along old ruts.
Darkly visible, it only seems as if it were there.
I know not whose son it is.
It images the forefather of God."
-  Translated by D. C. Lau, 1963, Chapter 4  

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-Depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic  By Hu Xuzehi
Tao Te Ching  Annotated translation by Victor Mair  
Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim
The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller  

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall
Tao Te Ching on The Art of Harmony   By Chad Hansen. 
The Way and Its Power: Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought   By Arthur Waley

 

                             

 

 

 

"The Way is like an empty vessel
That yet may be drawn from
Without ever needing to be filled.
It is bottomless; the very progenitor of all things in the world.
In it all sharpness is blunted,
All tangles untied,
All glare tempered,
All dust soothed.
It is like a deep pool that never dries.
Was it too the child of something else?
We cannot tell.
But as a substanceless image it existed before the Ancestor."
-  Translated by Arthur Waley, 1934, Chapter 4 

 

 

"The subtle Way of the universe appears to lack strength,
yet its power is inexhaustible.
Fathomless, it could be the origin of all things.
It has no sharpness,
yet it rounds off all sharp edges.
It has no form,
yet it unties all tangles.
It has no glare,
yet it merges all lights.
It harmonizes all things and unites them as one integral whole.
It seems so obscure,
yet it is the Ultimate Clarity.
Whose offspring it is can never be known.
It is that which existed before any divinity."
-  Translated by Hua-Ching Ni, 1995, Chapter 4  

 

 

"The Tao is like an empty container:
it can never be emptied and can never be filled.
Infinitely deep, it is the source of all things.
It dulls the sharp, unties the knotted,
shades the lighted, and unites all of creation with dust.

It is hidden but always present.
I don't know who gave birth to it.
It is older than the concept of God."
-  Translated by John H. McDonald, 1996, Chapter 4 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching  Translated by Stephen Addiss and Stanley Lombardo  

Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching  Translated by John C. Wu

Lao-Tzu and the Tao-Te-Ching  Translated by Livia Kohn

Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way Translated by Moss Roberts

 

                             

 

 

 

"The Way is empty, yet never refills with use;
Bottomless it is, like the forefather of the myriad creatures.
It files away sharp points,
unravels tangles,
diffuses light,
mingles with the dust.
Submerged it lies,
seeming barely to subsist.
I know not whose child it is,
only that it resembles the predecessor of God."
-  Translated by Victor H. Mair, 1990, Chapter 4 

 

 

"The Tao is invisibly empty,
But its use is extremely plentiful.
It is profound like the originator of all things.
It shows no sharpness,
stays away from entanglements,
glows with veiled radiance,
mingles with dust.
It is formless and invisible, but indeed exists.
I do not know where it comes,
It seems to have appeared before the existence of God."
-  Translated by Gu Zhengkun, Chapter 4 

 

 

"The Way is a void,
Used but never filled:
An abyss it is,
From which all things come.
It blunts sharpness,
Resolves tangles;
It tempers light,
Subdues turmoil.
A deep pool it is,
Never to run dry!
Whose offspring it may be
I do not know:
It is like a preface to God."
-  Translated by Raymond Blackney, 1955, Chapter 4 

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

Walking the Way: 81 Zen Encounters with the Tao Te Ching by Robert Meikyo Rosenbaum

The Tao of Zen by Ray Grigg

Tao Te Ching: Zen Teachings on the Taoist Classic by Takuan Soho 

Buddhism and Taoism Face to Face: Scripture, Ritual, and Iconographic Exchange in Medieval China by Christine Mollier  

 

                                     

 

 

 

"Tao is infinite.
If we use It, we find It inexhaustible,
Deep!
It appears to be Ancestor of all things.
It rounds our angles. It unravels our difficulties. It harmonizes our Light. It brings our atoms into Unity.
Pure!
It appears to be everlasting in principle.
I do not know whose Son It is,
It existed before God was manifest in Form."
-  Translated by Isabella Mears, 1916, Chapter 4 

 

 

"The Tao is like an empty bowl,
Which in being used can never be filled up.
Fathomless, it seems to be the origin of all things.
It blunts all sharp edges,
It unties all tangles,
It harmonizes all lights,
It unites the world into one whole.
Hidden in the deeps,
Yet it seems to exist for ever.
I do not know whose child it is;
It seems to be the common ancestor of all, the father  of things."
-  Translated by John C. H. Wu, 1961, Chapter 4 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81                  

 

 

 

"Nature contains nothing but natures; and these natures are nothing over and above Nature.
In Nature, all natures originate,
all conflicts are settled, all differences are united, all disturbances are quieted.
Yet no matter how many natures come into being, they can never exhaust Nature.
To look for an external source of Nature is foolish, for Nature is the source of all else."
-  Translated by Archie J. Bahm, 1958, Chapter 4 

 

 

"Der Sinn ist immer strömend.
Aber es läuft in seinem Wirken doch nie über.
Ein Abgrund ist er, wie der Ahn aller Dinge.
Er mildert ihre Schärfe.
Er löst ihre Wirrsale.
Er mäßigt ihren Glanz.
Er vereinigt sich mit ihrem Staub.
Tief ist er und doch wie wirklich.
Ich weiß nicht, wessen Sohn er ist.
Er scheint früher zu sein als Gott."
-  Translated by Richard Wilhelm, 1911, Chapter 4

 

 

"Dao is akin to an empty vessel.
It is inexhaustible, as if the vessel can never be filled completely.
So deep and unfathomable,
It must be from where all things come forth.
Dao blunts its own sharpness,
Simplifies its own complexity,
Attenuates its own brilliance,
And mingles with the dirt.
Vast and profound, it appears that it could go on forever.
I do not know whose progeny it is.
It was there before the existence of the creator."
-  Translated by Han Hiong Tan, Chapter 4 
 

 

 

Tao Te Ching   Translated by David Hinton

The Book of Tao: Tao Te Ching - The Tao and Its Characteristics   Translated by James Legge

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Growth of a Religion   By Isabelle Robinet

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tsu), Daoist Scripture: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotations, Notes

Zhuangzi: Basic Writings   Translated by Burton Watson

Zhuangzi Speaks: The Music of Nature   An illustrated comic by Chih-chung Ts'ai

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons

 

                                              

 

 

 

"The Tao appears as emptiness, with unreplenished hands,

And in its vast profundity is like the sire of all,

It smoothes the angles in our path, unravels twisted strands,

Softens the glaring light, and fills the clouds of dust that fall.

How pure and still the Tao is! as if it would endure

Forever and forever, oh! whose offspring can it be?

I do not know whose son it is, its birth is so obscure

It seems it might have been before God, in eternity!"
-  Translated by Isaac Winter Heysinger, 1903, Chapter 4 

 

 

"Tao is like an empty vessel,
yet use will not drain it.
Never needing to be filled,
it is the deep and unfathomable source
of the ten thousand things.

Blunt the sharpness.
Untangle the knots.
Soften the glare.
Settle like dust.
Let your wheels move only along old ruts.

Darkly visible,
it only seems as if it were there.
I know not its name.
It existed before the ten thousand things.
I call it Tao."
-  Translated by Kari Hohne, 2009, Chapter 4  

 

 

 

 

 

"Tao is a whirling emptiness, yet when used it cannot be exhausted.
Out of this mysterious well flows everything in existence.
Blunting sharp edges, Untangling knots, Softening the glare, It evolves us all and makes the whole world one.
Something is there, hidden and deep!
But I do not know whose child it is.
It came even before God."
-  Translated by Brian Browne Walker, 1996, Chapter 4 

 

 

 

 

"The Tao resembleth the emptiness of Space; to employ it, we must avoid creating ganglia.
Oh Tao, how vast art Thou, the Abyss of Abysses, thou
Holy and Secret Father of all Fatherhoods of Things!
Let us make our sharpness blunt; let us loosen our complexes; let us
tone down our brightness to the general obscurity.
Oh Tao, how still art thou, how pure, continuous One beyond Heaven!
This Tao hath no Father; it is beyond all other conceptions, higher than the highest."
-  Translated by Aleister Crowley, 1918, Chapter 4  

    

 

 

 

 

 

Further Teachings of Lao-Tzu: Understanding the Mysteries (Wen Tzu)   Translated by Thomas Cleary

The Lunar Tao: Meditations in Harmony with the Seasons   By Deng Ming-Dao

Awakening to the Tao   By Lui I-Ming (1780) and translated by Thomas Cleary

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo

Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections from Traditional Commentaries   Translation and commentary by Brook Ziporyn

The Inner Chapters of Chuang Tzu (Zhuangzi)   Translated by A. C. Graham

 

                                  

 

 

 

"The Tao is as emptiness, so are its operations.
It resembles non-fullness.
Fathomless!
It seems to be the ancestor of all form.
It removes sharpness, unravels confusion, harmonizes brightness, and becomes one with everything.
Pellucid!
It bears the appearance of permanence.
I know not whose son it is.
Its Noumenon was before the Lord."
-   Translated by C. Spurgeon Medhurst, 1905, Chapter 4

 

 

"The way is fluid, and yet in its practice
Somehow there is nothing in excess
So deep-
As if ancestor to the myriad beings
Blunt in its sharpness
Resolved in its tangles
Shaded in its glare
One with this world
So deep & clear
Seeming as though seeming to exist
We do not know whose child this is
But imagine it divinity’s ancestor."
-  Translated by Bradford Hatcher, 2005, Chapter 4  

 

 

"The Tao is like a well:
used but never used up.
It is like the eternal void:
filled with infinite possibilities.
It is hidden but always present.
I don't know who gave birth to it.
It is older than God."
-  Translated by Stephen Mitchell, 1988, Chapter 4

 

 

"The Way is like an empty vessel which, in spite of being used, is never filled.
How bottomless it is, like the progenitor of the ten thousand things!
How deep it is, as if it will last forever!
Generated by I know not what, it is the Image of what was before the Emperors".
-  Translated by Jan J. L. Duyvendak, 1954, Chapter 4

 

 

"Le Tao est vide; si l'on en fait usage, il paraît inépuisable.
Ô qu'il est profond ! Il semble le patriarche de tous les êtres.
Il émousse sa subtilité, il se dégage de tous liens, il tempère sa splendeur, il s'assimile à la poussière.
Ô qu'il est pur!
Il semble subsister éternellement.
J'ignore de qui il est fils; il semble avoir précédé le maître du ciel.
"
-  Translated by Stanislas Julien, 1842, Chapter 4

 

 

 

Spanish Language Versions of the Tao Te Ching (Daodejing)
Tao Te Ching en Español


Lao Tsé Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Anton Teplyy

Tao Te Ching   Traducido por Stephen Mitchell, versión española  

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por el Padre Carmelo Elorduy

Lifestyle Advice from Wise Persons   Consejos de Estilo de Vida de Sabios

Tao Te Ching en Español

Lao Tzu-The Eternal Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Yuanxiang Xu y Yongjian Yin 

Ripening Peaches: Taoist Studies and Practices   By Mike Garofalo    Maduración Duraznos: Estudios y Prácticas Taoístas por Mike Garofalo

Tao Te Ching - Wikisource

Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por William Scott Wilson. 

Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching   Traducido al español por Javier Cruz

Tao te king   Translated by John C. H. Wu, , versión española  

Daodejing   Español, Inglés, y Chino Versiones Lingüísticas de la Daodejing


 

                                      

 

 

 

"El Tao es como un jarrón
que el uso nunca llena.
Es iqual que un abismo,
origen de todas las cosas del mundo.

El embota cualquier filo,
El desmadeja cualquier ovillo,
El fusiona todas las cuces,
El unifica todos los polvos.

El parece muy frofundo,
parece durar siempre.
Higo de un no sé qué,
debe de ser el antepasado de los dioses."
-  Translated by Alba, 1998, Tao Te Ching, Capítulo 4 

 

 

"El Tao es vacío,
imposible de colmar,
y por eso, inagotable en su acción.
En su profundidad reside el origen
de todas las cosas.
Suaviza sus asperezas,
disuelve la confusión,
atempera su esplendor,
y se identifica con el polvo.
Por su profundidad parece ser eterno.
No sé quién lo concibió,
pero es más antiguo que los dioses."
-  Translation from Wikisource, 2013,
Capítulo 4 

 

 

"Tao es una nave sin fondo;
Usado por sí mismo, no se llena con el Mundo;
No puede ser cortado, limitado, ocultado o inmovilizado;
Sus profundidades están escondidas, ubicuo y eterno;
Desconozco de donde proviene;
Llegó antes que la Naturaleza."
-  Translated by Antonio Rivas Gonzálvez, 1998,
Capítulo 4

 

 

El Tao es un recipiente hueco, lo usas y nunca se llena.
¡Cuán profundo e insondable es!
Parece anterior a todo.
Redondea sus ángulos, desenreda sus marañas, suaviza su resplandor, se adapta a su polvo.
¡Tan hondo! y sin embargo siempre está presente.
Nadie sabe de quién es hijo, parece antepasado de los dioses."
Translation from Logia Medio Dia, 2015,
Capítulo 4

 

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0

 

 

 

 

Taoism, Daoism

 

 

Next Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #5

Previous Chapter of the Tao Te Ching #3

Chapter and Thematic Index to the Tao Te Ching

 

 

 

 

 

Tao Te Ching
Commentary, Interpretations, Research Tools, Resources
Chapter 4

 

Tao Te Ching Translations OnlineTerebess Asia Online.  124 nicely formatted complete English language translations, on separate webpages, of the Daodejing.  Alphabetical Index.  Each webpage has all 81 chapters of the Tao Te Ching translated into English.  An outstanding collection─ the Best on the Internet!! 


Daodejing by Laozi: Chapters with Chinese characters, seal script, detailed word by word concordance, Pinyin (tone#), German, French and English.  This is an outstanding resource for serious students of the Tao Te Ching


Yellow Bridge Dao De Jing Comparison Table   Provides side by side comparisons of translations of the Tao Te Ching by James Legge, D. T. Suzuki, and Dwight Goddard.  Chinese characters for each paragraph in the Chapter are on the left; place your cursor over the Chinese characters to see the Pinyin Romanization of the Chinese character and a list of meanings. 


Center Tao.  Includes a brief commentary on each Chapter.  A keyword glossary for each chapter is provided. 


Tao Te Ching Commentaries - Google Search 


Tao Te Ching in Chinese characters, Pinyin Romanization, English and German by Dr. Hilmar Alquiros. 


Translators' Index, Tao Te Ching Translators Sorted Alphabetically by Translator, Links to Books and Online Versions


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching: Bibliography, Resources, Links


Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching, Daodejing en Español


Concordance to the Daodejing


The Tao of Zen.  By Ray Grigg.  Tuttle, 2012, 256 pages.  Argues for the view that Zen is best characterized a version of philosophical Taoism (i.e., Laozi and Zhuangzi) and not Mahayana Buddhism. 


Tao Te Ching: The Definitive Edition  By Jonathan Star.  Translation, commentary and research tools.  New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Penguin, 2001.  Concordance, tables, appendices, 349 pages.  A new rendition of the Tao Te Ching is provided, then a verbatim translation with extensive notes.  Detailed tables for each verse provide line number, all the Chinese characters, Wade-Giles Romanization, and a list of meanings for each character.  An excellent print reference tool! 


Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu.  By Professor by Alan Kam-Leung Chan.   SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  State University of New York Press, 1991.  Index, bibliography, glossary, notes, 314 pages.  ISBN: 0791404560.     


Chinese Reading of the Daodejing  Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi with Critical Text and Translation.  By Professor Rudolf G. Wagner.  A SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture.  English and Mandarin Chinese Edition.  State University of New York Press; Bilingual edition (October 2003).  540 pages.  ISBN: 978-0791451823.  Wang Bi (Wang Pi, Fusi), 226-249 CE, Commentary on the Tao Te Ching.


Chapter 4 in the Rambling Taoist Commentaries by Trey Smith.  The Rambling Taoists are Trey Smith and Scott Bradley. 


The Philosophy of the Daodejing  By Hans-Georg Moeller.  Columbia University Press, 2006, 176 pages.  


Valley Spirit, Gu Shen, Concept, Chapter 6 


Tao Te Ching English Translations from Terebess Asia Online.  Over 30 translations. 


Lao-tzu's Taoteching
 Translated by Red Pine (Bill Porter).  Includes many brief selected commentaries for each Chapter draw from commentaries in the past 2,000 years.  Provides a verbatim translation and shows the text in Chinese characters.  San Francisco, Mercury House, 1996, Second Edition, 184 pages.  An invaluable resource for commentaries.   


Reading Lao Tzu: A Companion to the Tao Te Ching with a New Translation  By Ha Poong Kim.  Xlibris, 2003, 198 pages. 


Chapter 4, Line by Line Comparisons of 27 Translations of the Tao Te Ching Compiled by the St. Xenophon Wayist Seminary 


Dao De Jing: A Philosophical Translation  By Roger T. Ames and David T. Hall.  Ballantine, 2003, 256 pages. 


Thematic Index to the 81 Chapters of the Tao Te Ching


Lao Tzu: Te-Tao Ching - A New Translation Based on the Recently Discovered Ma-wang-tui Texts (Classics of Ancient China) Translated with and introduction and detailed exposition and commentary by Professor Robert G. Henricks.  New York, Ballantine Books, 1992.  Includes Chinese characters for each chapter.  Bibliography, detailed notes, 282 pages. 


Lieh-Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living.  Translated by Eva Wong.  Lieh-Tzu was writing around 450 BCE.  Boston, Shambhala, 2001.  Introduction, 246 pages. 


Revealing the Tao Te Ching: In-depth Commentaries on an Ancient Classic.  By Hu Huezhi.  Edited by Jesse Lee Parker.  Seven Star Communications, 2006.  240 pages. 


Cloud Hands Blog   Mike Garofalo writes about Taoism, Gardening, Taijiquan, Walking, Mysticism, Qigong, and the Eight Ways.


Tao Te Ching: A New Translation and Commentary.  By Ellen Chen.  Paragon House, 1998.  Detailed glossary, index, bibliography, notes, 274 pages. 


The Tao and Method: A Reasoned Approach to the Tao Te Ching.  By Michael Lafargue.  New York, SUNY Press, 1994.  640 pages.  Detailed index, bibliography, notes, and tables.  An essential research tool. 


The Whole Heart of Tao: The Complete Teachings From the Oral Tradition of Lao Tzu.
By John Bright-Fey.  Crane Hill Publishers, 2006.  376 pages.

 

 

Commentary

Chapter 4

 

 

GOD (Ti / Di 帝)
Divine Ancestor / Emperor
or some say, Empress
"I don't know who gave birth to it (Tao).
It is older than Ti."

 

 

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Laozi, Dao De Jing

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching


Research and Indexing by
Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California
Green Way Research, 2010-2015. 
Indexed and Compiled by Michael P. Garofalo

 

Creative Commons License
This webpage work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Created by Michael P. Garofalo, Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Gushen Grove Notebooks, Red Bluff, California, © 2015 CCA 4.0



This webpage was last modified or updated on August 7, 2015.  
 
This webpage was first distributed online on November 5, 2010. 
 

 

Michael P. Garofalo's E-mail

Brief Biography of Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, California

Study Chi Kung or Tai Chi with Mike Garofalo

 

 


Ripening Peaches: Daoist Studies and Practices

Taoism: Resources and Guides

Cloud Hands Blog

Valley Spirit Qigong

Ways of Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Months: Cycles of the Seasons

Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu, Zhuang Zhou, Master Chuang)  369—286 BCE

Chan (Zen) and Taoist Poetry

Yang Style Taijiquan

Chen Style Taijiquan

Taoist Perspectives: My Reading List

Meditation

Bodymind Theory and Practices, Somaesthetics

The Five Senses

How to Live a Good Life: Advice from Wise Persons

Grandmaster Chang San Feng

Virtues

Qigong (Chi Kung) Health Practices

One Old Daoist Druid's Final Journey: Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

Index to Cloud Hands and Valley Spirit Websites

 

Gushen Grove Notebooks for the Tao Te Ching 

Introduction

Bibliography  

Index to English Language Translators of the Tao Te Ching

Thematic Index 1-81  

Chapter Index 1-81    

Concordance to the Daodejing

Recurring Themes (Terms, Concepts, Leimotifs) in the Tao Te Ching

Spanish Language Translations of the Tao Te Ching

Resources

The Tao Te Ching (Dao De Jing) by Lao Tzu (Laozi) circa 500 BCE

 

 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

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Tao Te Ching
 Chapter Number Index


Standard Traditional Chapter Arrangement of the Daodejing
Chapter Order in Wang Bi's Daodejing Commentary in 246 CE
Chart by Mike Garofalo
Subject Index
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60
61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70
71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80
81