Cloud Hands
T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Qigong

 

Wu Dang Sword Forms

Compiled and Indexed By
Michael P. Garofalo

Bibliography     Links     List of Movements    Quotations

Tai Chi Sword (Jian) - General, All Styles       32 Sword Form Yang 

Sword Techniques

 


Jian - Sword

 

Started in January, 2007.  To be Completed by December, 2008.
Last Updated on November 10, 2007
Copyright by Green Way Research

 

Disclaimer

Warning:  Practicing with Sword Weapons Can Be a Dangerous Activity for Adults

 

 

Cloud Hands - Yun Shou

Cloud Hands Homepage

 

 

 

 

Bibliography, Links, Resources
Wudang, Wu Dan, Wu Tang Jian Shu, Wudang Sword Forms

 

 

Alphabetical Index to the Cloud Hands Taijiquan Website 


The Art of Chinese Swordsmanship: The Manual of Taiji Jian.  By Yun Zhang.
New York, Weatherhill, 1998.  287 pages.  ISBN:
0834804123.  Sifu Yun
Xhang was a student of Grandmaster Wang Peisheng (Ying Cheng).  
A 32 movement Wu short Jian form, by Wang Peisheng is taught.  MGC.  


Bagua Zhang Swordsmanship 


Beautiful Heart, Beautiful Spirit.   Shing-Ling-Mei Wudang Qigong as taught by 
Master Qing Chuan Wang.   By Katherine Orr.  Dragongate Publishing, 2005.
256 pages.  ISBN: 0976517809.  


Blue Dragon Wudang Sword.  Pan Long Men Wudang Martial Arts.  Featuring Sun, Xiang. 


Chen Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan Swordsmanship:  Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes 


Chinese Calligraphy for Martial Arts


Classical Tai Chi Sword.  By Petra Kobayashi, Toyo Kobayashi, and Chiang Tao Chi.
Charles E. Tuttle, 2003.   176 pages.  ISBN: 0804834482.  Useful explanation of
the 53 movement Yang style sword form.  MGC. 


Cinnabar Style of Wudang Taoist Sword VCD  


Classical Tai Chi Sword, List of Movements, Yang Style, 55 Movements, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List,.Detailed, 38 pages  


Classical Tai Chi Sword, List of Movements, Yang Style, 55 Movements, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List, Simple List, 2 pages  


Classical Tai Chi Chuan Sword, Taijiquan Jian 55 in the Yang Style: Comparison of Names or Descriptions for the 55 Movements.  Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  This document includes a detailed listing of the names or brief descriptions of the 55 movements of the Classical Taijiquan Straight Sword Form in the Yang Style of Taijiquan.  This document includes names or brief descriptions for each movement in English, Romanized Chinese (Pinyin and/or Wade Giles), Chinese characters, Spanish, French, German, and Japanese.  The document includes source citations and a bibliography.  In PDF format, print only, 280Kb, 38 pages:
Webpage: http://www.egreenway.com/taichichuan/Classical Taijiquan Yang Sword Form 55 List Detailed.pdf 


Cloud Hands: Taijiquan and Qigong  


Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.  Directed by Ang Lee.  Columbia Tri Star, 2000.  
ASIN: B00003CXR4.  Starring Yun-Fat Chow and Michaelle Yeoh.  


Drunken Immortals Style of Wudang Taoist Sword VCD 


Eight Immortals Sword Form, Wudang Ba Xian Jian


Elixir Wudang Sword.  Instructional DVD.  Taught by You Xuan De - the fourteenth successor of Wudang
Kung Fu.   He is now the general director of Mount Wudang Taoism temples. In this VCD teaching
program, You Xuan De gives individual movement explanation. His disciple You Xiao Long
gives the demonstrations.  Wudang Elixir Sword 2 DVD


Floating Clouds Sword Play of Wudang School.  "The sword play of Wudang school is one of the best to take on the
traits of Chinese traditional technique and skill of swordplay. Its unique style lies in the state of art combination of Eight
step mantis, well balance of the whole body as well as the movement of sword. At one's will, the sword is usually played
in the elegant manner, which is quick or slow, harmonious and natural. Actually, it's most treasured classic routine of
swordplay among Wudang school.  The sword play is demonstrated by Wen Xuanzhen, the 12th disciple of Innermost
Taoist Martial Arts. ."  


Floating Cloud Sword or Travelers' Sword.  VCD in Chinese and English, 60 minutes.   "This is a long weapon, physically.
And therefore it is often used with the left hand helping on the technique. The practitioner shows a very nice set here with
definite Wu Dang flavor. It could easily be a Bagua Long Sword. Though he is a little rough the set is interesting with some
beautiful sections and great spinning movements. Longish, but not impossible. Fluid and strong with repeated sections to
create a thematic unity. Traditional. By Wen XuanZhen, 12th generation disciple. Demonstrated by Wen XuanZhen,
12th generation disciple of "Innermost Taoist School of Martial Arts."  Distributed by Plum Publications. 


Floating Clouds Sword Play of the Wundang School.  "The sword play of wudang school is one of the best to take
on the traits of Chinese traditional technique and skill of swordplay. Its unique style lies in the state of art combination
of Eight step mantis, well balance of the whole body as well as the movement of sword. At one's will, the sword is
usually played in the elegant manner, which is quick or slow, harmonious and natural. Actually, it's most treasured
classic routine of swordplay among Wudang school.  The sword play is demonstrated by Wen Xuanzhen,
the 12th disciple of Innermost Taoist Martial Arts."


49 Wudang Tai Chi Sword - DeYin Lee   "Tai Chi Sword is a mixture of Tai Chi Sword and Wu Dang Sword.  WuDang was
one of the main Wushu Pai (Family) in ancient China.  This suite was formed by Mr. TenKay Lee.  It consists of:  1.  Motion -
42 kinds, 2.  Sword work - 22 kinds, 3. Leg work - 3 kinds, and 4. Use of Force - 3 kinds.  Demonstrated by
Mr. Hung Kwan Fung, Champion of Wu's style of Tai Chin in China Closed Tai Chi Championship.  2 VCD set in
Mandarin Chinese.  Also distributed by Plum Publications"Teacher Li De-Yi demonstrates the practical side of the art on
this VCD. This VCD shows a nice, relatively simple version of the WuDang Tai Chi sword. Movements are soft and fluid.
Much use of evasive footwork and some body arching which conforms to the classical flavor of the sword. A popular teacher
among Chinese speakers. His moves and his student's are clear and refined."  2 VCD set in Chinese.  "
Taiji Sword is one of
short weaponry routines of tai chi boxing integrated with tai chi boxing and swordplay techniques. Wudang Taiji Jian was
adapted from Wudang Sword and Taiji Sword and compiled by Li Tianji. It preserved the characteristics of Wudang sword.
Entire routine has 49 movements divided into 6 sections. This teaching program was demonstrated and explained by renown
Chinese martial arts master Professor Li Deyin. It is a popular educational program played by CCTV.  Professor Li Deyin
is the well known figure in China for his outstanding contribution in promoting Tai Chi. He is the director of the Physical
Education Department of Beijing People's University and Vice Chairman of Beijing Wushu Association."   Deyin Family


Google Searches:  Wudang Kung Fu, Wudang Sword,


Green Destiny Sword from "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon."  Replica 1, Replica 2, Replica 3, Replica 4, Replica 5.


Index to the Cloud Hands Website


100 Days of Swordsmanship.  A blog by Charlie in Boston. 


Mount Wudang and Wudang Kung Fu  


Number of Movements in Different Wudang Sword Forms - A List


Relaxation (Sung) in Tai Chi Chuan


Saber (Dao) Tai Chi Chuan: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes 


Song Xi Bai (White) Hong (Rainbow) Sword.  Featuring Master You, Ming Sheng. 
Wudang Song Xi Branch Series.


Staff Weapons: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes


Sun Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan Swordsmanship   Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes 


Sword Forms, T'ai Chi Ch'uan: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes 


T'ai Chi Ch'uan Sword Forms: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes   By Mike Garofalo.  218Kb. 


T'ai Chi Thirteen Sword: A Sword Master's Manual.  By Stuart A. Olson.   
Translations by Stuart Olson.  Burbank, CA, Unique Publications, 1998.  
258 pages.  ISBN: 1892515148.  MGC.   Detailed description and charts
for the 61 Movement Yang Style sword form.  General principles are discussed,
and 13 basic movements are covered in detail. 


23 Internal/External Forms from Wu Dang Mountain and Qingdao City.  VHS or DVD, 120
minutes.  A variety of forms are demonstrated.  Based on Jiang Jian-ye's trip to Wu Dang
Mountain and Qingdao. 
Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.   



Video Clips Online

     Wudang Tai Chi Sword, 4:51.

     Xuan Men Wundang Sword, 1:13

 

War Sword Play of the Wundang School  "The war-sword play is one of the typical representatives of
Wudang school. Matching the art of broadsword, it's characterized by the uniqueness of holding the weapon
with both hands, so that the chop and stab can be done grandly and powerfully. Actually, it's most treasured
classic routine of swordplay among Wudang School.  The sword play is demonstrated by Wen xuanzhen,
the 12 disciple of Innermost Taoist Martial Arts."


Wu Dang Boxing War Sword.  VCD in English and Chinese.  "If the traveler’s sword is strictly transition this one is strictly
striking. This “Striking” sword is also known as the “War Sword.”  It is highly prized in the Wu Dang school. Once again
it is a large, two handed weapon. The set is almost straight up and straight back following the typical “road” design. The
movements are forceful and varied, something like the Miao Dao. Surprisingly direct and applicable for a school which
delights in “xuan.” Demonstrated by Wen XuanZhen, 12th generation disciple of "Innermost Taoist School of Martial Arts."
Distributed by Plum Publications. 


Wudang Eight Drunken Immortals Sword DVD


Wudang Kung Fu


Wu Dang Mind/Body Arts: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes


Wu Dang San Feng Tai Chi Sword.  VHS or DVD format, 117 minutes.  Instructional videotape
by Jiang Jian-ye.  A 19 form set. 
Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.   


Wudang Style of Martial Arts.  Chinese Taoist Martial Arts Association. 


Wudang Sword Characteristics.  Chinese Taoist Martial Arts Association.  They teach 8 Wudang sword forms. 


Wudang Sword Form 92 Movements.  Five Winds Tai Chi.  List of the 92 Movements of this Wudang sword form. 


Wudang Sword Forms DVDs HiQua Sports  


Wudang Sword Forms - Listed by the Number of Movements in the Form  


WuDang Sword Key Points.  By Huang Yuan-Xiu.  53 pages.  "Written in 1931 (republished in 2002), this is a classic text
on the WuDang Sword. Huang Yuan-Xiu not only discusses sword basics, construction and philosophy, but demonstrates a
two-person usage. Margin notes clarify textual points. Photographs, though old, are clear and easily understood. The traditional
Chinese characters are very cleanly printed. 43 illustrations, mostly photographs. A nice text. An appendix discussing the teachings
of Li JingLin (FangChen) one of the greatest sword practitioners of the 20th Century and a person dedicated to organizing and
preserving sword technique."  Lion Books Weapons. 


Wudang Tai Chi Sword.  Online video clip, 4:51.  Demonstration and instruction by Master Jesse Tsao,
San Diego.  Available from Tai Chi Healthways. 


Wu Dang Tai Chi Sword.  VHS or DVD, 120 minutes.  Instructional videotape by Jiang Jian-ye.
Created by Li Tian-Ji. 
Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.   Also available from Wayfarer Publications.  


Wu Dang Wuji Sword.  VHS or DVD, 120 minutes.  Instructional videotape by Jiang Jian-ye.
A 30 movement form. 
Website: Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.    


Wu Tang Fighting Arts Forum  


Xuan Men Sword, Master Yuan Xiu Gang performing the Wudang Xuanmen Sword Form with the Tai Chi sword.  1:13 Minutes. 


Yang Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan Swordsmanship: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes


 

 

 

Jian Shu - Swordsmanship

 

 

 

List of Movements
 

Wudang Sword Forms - Listed by the Number of Movements in the Form


13 Key Skills in Elixir Wudang Sword.

49 Wudang Tai Chi Sword - DeYin Lee

92 Wudang Sword - Five Winds Tai Chi

 

 

 

 

Disclaimer

Warning:  Practicing with Sword Weapons Can Be a Dangerous Activity for Adults

 

 

 

 

Jian Shu - Swordsmanship

 

 

 

Quotations, References, Notes, History
Wu Dang, Wudang, Wu Tang Jian, Wudang Sword Forms

 

 

"As one of the Wudang martial arts traditions, Wudang Sword was originated at an unknown time.  Famous for its ability to
dissolve the enemy's strength in flexible rotated movements, the swordsmanship focuses on thrashing, stabbing, shelving, etc.
The footwork requires gentleness, steadiness, and quickness.  The body moves continuously with the sword forward or
backward, in rotation or turning.  It requires the body to move like a flying dragon, the sword like a snake's tongue, with
the unification of hands, eyes, body and feet.  In pair bayonet practice, it requires the triangle skill from the upper, lower,
left and right and the skill of Yin-Yang sword rotation.  It stresses non-withstanding, attacking the void and avoiding the
solid, changing with motion and striking with nicety and celerity.  Besides a set of formulae for moving-pace pair bayonet
practice, the tradition contains five sets of formulae."
-  Yuan Kangjiu, Wudang Jian, Translated by Luo Tongbing, Edited by David Palmer

 

 

"Attack during the weak point of the opponent, avoid brute force, and get the opponent in one single attack.  This is
the strategic principle of Wu Dang sword play. It suggests "following the flow of opponent's force and borrowing the
opponent's power"; "remain tranquil to wait for opponent's movement"; "launch the attack later but hit the opponent
before his attack reaches you." When fighting with an opponent, avoid direct confrontation with his strong force and
attack him when his force is weak or near an end. Go around the opponent but attack him along a straight line. Circle
around the opponent to enclose his attacks. It also points out that the uniqueness of using a straight sword as weapon
is that it is not used to intercept and contact physically with the opponent's weapon. Instead, a swordsman just finds
the gap in the opponent's defense and attacks him in lightening speed."
Wudang Sword Principles

 

 

"When you begin your study of jian, you should first learn each movement of the from in great detail.  The ability to perform
the movements correctly is basic to all other skills.  It is usually best to study the form several times through from beginning
to end at increasing levels of detail.  After you have learned the basic movements, you should focus your attention on
your footwork and stances and then become adept at controlling the range, direction, and level of your movements. 
Next, you should perfect the ways you hold the sword and practice changing grips quickly and comfortably so that you
can correctly execute the different movements.  Jian must be held very flexibly so that the angle and thrust of the sword,
especially at the edges, can be adeptly changed.  An understanding of the application of the different movements can
be very helpful at this point in your training.
Once your movements are correct and can be smoothly performed, you should turn your attention to the training of
the internal components, shen, yi, and qi.  Let your movements reflect your inner feelings.  The inclusion of fighting
skills in your practice at this point can help you become more aware of your feelings. 
This part of your training will require a lot of time and discipline.  Do not rush or become impatient.  Practice regularly
and with devotion and take one step at a time.  It is counterproductive and dangerous to seek shortcuts.  There are
none to be found and the futile search for them will distract you and will make it less likely that you will ever achieve
a high level of expertise. 
Finally, do not forget to study Tai Chi principles.  They are the essential foundation of the form and if you do not
understand them, it will be impossible to attain high-level mastery."
-   Zhang Yun, The Art of Chinese Swordsmanship, 1998, p.34.  

 

 


"There is a saying in kungfu circles as follows, "Shaolin Staff, Wudang Sword," indicating that Shaolin Kung Fu is famous
for the staff, whereas Wudang Kung Fu is famous for the sword.  These two weapons are also characteristic of the two
respective styles of kungfu. 

Shaolin philosophy is marked by compassion, and the staff manifests this quality of compassion as it has no sharp edges
or pointed tips to hurt the opponent seriously.  The sword manifests the characteristic of fluidity and gentleness of
Wudang Kungfu. 

According to legend, the Shaolin staff techniques were first taught by Jinnalou, an Indian Buddhist monk who stayed
at the Shaolin Monastery in China as a cook during the Tuan Dynasty.  Everyday he use a long, heavy stick to stir a
huge pot of rice.  One day, bandits attacked the monastery.  Jinnalou defeated them single-handedly.  Hence, after
that, he taught the staff techniques at the monastery.  However, today there are no Shaolin staff sets named after him.

The Wudang sword was developed during the Song Dynasty by Zhang San Feng himself, the first patriarch of Wudang
Kung Fu.  Zhang San Feng first practiced Shaolin Kung Fu at the Shaolin Monastery.  Later, he retired to the Wudang
Mountain to cultivate Taoism, and where he also developed Wudang Kung Fu, which later became Taijiquan.

Zhang San Fen was an expert of the sword, which he probably learned at the Shaolin Monastery.  He transmitted
Wudang Kung Fu, including the Wudang sword, to generations of Taoist priests who were famous for their swordsmanship.
In fact, these Wudang priests were better known for their sword techniques than their unarmed techniques.

However, centuries later when Wudang Kung Fu evolved into Taijiquan, the sword was less emphasized and unarmed combat
became more prominent.  The sword is the most important weapon in Taijiquan, but today the Taiji sword is better known for
demonstration than for combat.  While Taiji sword evolved from the Wudang sword, they are quite different."
-   Wong Kiew Kit, Selection of Questions and Answers, December 2002

 

 

 

"Wudang sword plays an important role in traditional Chinese Wushu. The saying goes that Wudang sword is Number One
in internal kungfu area and it is passed on secretly only to one disciple. Its guide book says that the practitioners should move
smoothly with whole body and the sword should unify with the body to form one. In such way the sword can conform with
the mind so that the sword seems reaches nowhere but everywhere.  Wudang Elixir Sword is divided into three sections,
that is, the heaven, the earth and the human. It has nine styles named with Taoist terms. Wudang Elixir Sword stresses the
multiple changes of one movement in the moving course. There 13 key skills in this routine: point, flick, raise, cloud, hang,
slice, sweep, pierce, block, circle, lead, chop and pull. The player should move its sword as a dragon flying with its head
and tail corresponding behind. The practitioners should feel free and relax and strike hard or gently as necessary>"
Elixir Wudang Sword.

 

 

"There are thirteen basic sword techniques although this depends upon the style. Some will have more and some will
have less. The thirteen basic techniques are:- pulling, carrying, lifting up, blocking, attacking, stabbing, pointing, jerking up,
chopping, stopping, turning, reverse sweeping and pressing. These techniques cover defending and attacking. Defending
does not require a lot of strength and should not make lots of “clangk, clangk noise”. It only happens in the movies
because it sounds and looks good. No matter how good the material of the sword, it will eventually break if you keep
chopping each other. A sword that has a double edge, you do not use the blade to block, but you use the back or
what is called spine of the blade. When blocking, it is also very important not to meet strength with strength. Instead
you use some of the earlier techniques mentioned, like pulling back or carrying the energy instead.

When we attack with a sword, we do not use the same energy as we would with a broadsword, such as chopping
down with all our strength. Instead, we more use the waist energy which is then transferred through to the fingers
and then the tip of the blade, as when using a stabbing attack. This is internal energy. So using the techniques of
reverse sweeping and lifting up are similar to using chopsticks to pick up a marble. It is a delicate skill, not like
chopping a stick with a knife. Sword skill also considers footwork. The foot and sword should be together. Most
of the time, the feet will move faster than the sword. The feet and body should feel light and flexible when we
practise, similar to a cat and snake. To learn the sword well takes a long time because many people will use
either too much or too little sword energy too much energy like using a cleever or too little and you
drop the sword. "
-   Michael Tse, Shaolin - Spirit of the Sword

 

 

Wudang Sword Principles:
1.  Change based on opponent's movement without any fixed rule.
2.  Attack during the weak point of the opponent, avoid brute force, and get the opponent in one single attack. 
3.  Body in harmony with the sword and the sword in harmony with the spirit. 
4.  Neutralize attack by body movement and walk swiftly lightly and stably.
Chinese Taoist Martial Arts Association

 

 

 

Jian Shu - Swordsmanship

 

Principles of Tai Chi Sword Practice
By Michael P. Garofalo

 

 

Principles of Tai Chi Ch'uan Sword Practice by Mike Garofalo

3a.  Use the appropriate sword for the style of the sword form you are practicing.
 

[I use the Flexible Tai Chi Sword from the forge of Paul Chen, Hanwei ($65-$110 retail).  The blade
is 30" long, unsharpened, thin, highly flexible, and made of spring steel.  The overall length of this
sword is 36.5", with a 6.5" handle.  The handle and scabbard are red.  The tassel is red.  This sword is the
Model 2062 and weighs 1 lb.  There are many examples online:  Example 1, Example 2.  "Developed in
response to requests from wushu practitioners for swords with ultra-flexible blades, the Flexible
Straight Sword 2062-GT has spring steel blade that tapers to almost paper-thin at the tip. The light weight
(barely one pound) of the sword makes it extremely fast in skilled hands."  I practice the Wudang 49 Sword
Form with this Paul Chen Flexible Tai Chi Sword, and with a 50" rattan jo.  Although this sword is not
sharpened, I believe I should always think and practice as if it were sharpened.]

 

 

 

Disclaimer

 

 

 


Jian - Sword

 

 


 

 

Disclaimer

Warning:  Practicing with Sword Weapons Can Be a Dangerous Activity for Adults

 

 

Cloud Hands - Yun Shou

Cloud Hands Homepage

 

 

 

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Valley Spirit T'ai Chi Ch'uan Journal

 

 

Michael P. Garofalo, 2007, All Rights Reserved

Biography of Michael P. Garofalo

Green Way Research

 

 

Qigong: Links and Bibliography

Zen Poetry

Cuttings: Short Poems

Cold Mountain Sages

Meditation

Disclaimer

Fitness for Older Persons

Walking

The Spirit of Gardening

Yoga

Fitness and Well Being

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Chi Kung Website

Subject Index to the Cloud Hands Website

Disclaimer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alphabetical Subject Index

 

Cloud Hands Website
   
Taijiquan, Qigong, Taoism, Classics, Weapons: Sword and Staff


Fitness and Well Being Website

      Gardening, Meditation, Walking, Yoga, Strength Training,
      Fitness for Older Persons, Aerobics, Relaxation  


The Spirit of Gardening

   
2,700 Quotes Arranged by 130 Topics, History, Guides,
     Psycho-Spiritual Aspects of Gardening 

 

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Online Publishing, Research, Indexing, and Services
     By Michael P. Garofalo
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Michael and Karen Garofalo
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Web Guides, Bibliographies, Links, Directories, Lessons, Quotes, Notes

 


Alphabetical Subject Index

 

Above the Fog  -  Zen Poems   

Aging Well   

Alphabetical Subject Index to the Cloud Hands Website   

Ancient Goddesses - Quotations, Poems, Sayings, Prayers, Songs

Animal Frolics (Wu Qin Xi): Tiger, Bear, Crane, Deer, and Monkey

Arthritis Therapy - Exercise: T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Chi Kung      

Bagua Zhang (Eight Trigrams Boxing)    

Bear, Standing Bear, Level 1 Ranking, Valley Spirit Taijiquan

The Bear: The Five Animal Frolics (Wu Qin Xi)    

Bibliography - Ch'i Kung

Bibliography - Taijiquan     

Bicycling in Northern California    

Bird - Five Animal Frolics (Wu Qin Xi)  

Blog - Cloud Hands: Taijiquan and Qigong by Michael P. Garofalo  

Blog - Green Way by Michael P. Garofalo

Blog - Valley Spirit Journal by Michael P. Garofalo     

Book of Changes (I Ching) and Qigong (Dao-yin)

Blog: Green Way

Breathing and Taijiquan     

Breathing and Yoga    

Breathing Practices: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Quotes    

Breathwork   

Broadsword (Dao, Saber)

Buddhism and Martial Arts    

Buddhism - Tibetan: Shambhala Warriorship, Tantra, Yoga

Buddhist Ethics

California (Northern) T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Qigong Directory: Instructors, Schools, Information

Charkas (Energy Centers of the Subtle Body)

Chan Ssu Chin - Silk Reeling    

Cheng Man-Ch'ing  (1901-1975)    

Chen Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan     

Ch'i - Breathwork  

Chih - Taiji Ruler

Ch'i or Qi

Chi Kung (Qigong) and Yoga Classes, Red Bluff, California.  Instructor:  Mike Garofalo.

Ch'i Kung: Bibliography and Links    

Chi Kung Blog  

Chi Kung for Seniors

Ch'i Kung Instructor: Michael P. Garofalo in Red Bluff, California   

Chi Kung: Valley Spirit Center     Red Bluff, California

Chinese Massage   

Chinese Yoga - 12 Animals

Ch'i or Qi and Taijiquan     

Circle Walking - Bagua Zhang (Eight Trigrams Boxing)    

Classes, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Instructional Program

Classics of T'ai Chi Ch'uan     

Cloud Hands Blog  

Cloud Hands Blog RSS Feed

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Ch'i Kung     

Cloud Hands T'ai Chi Ch'uan Journal     

Cold Mountain: Han Shan

Comments and Notes on the Yang Style Taijiquan     

Concrete and Visual Poetry     

Confucius (K'ung Fu-tzu)  (551 - 479 BCE)    

Contemplation    

Correct Taijiquan Practice Principles

Crane - Bird - Five Animal Frolics (Wu Qin Xi)

Crane, Soaring Crane, Intermediate Program, Level 3, Valley Spirit T'ai Chi Ch'uan   

Cuttings: Short Poems by Michael P. Garofalo  

Cuttings: Above the Fog  

Dance and Taijiquan       

Dao (Saber, Broadsword)

Dao-yin (Qigong, Chi Kung)

Dayan - Wild Goose Qigong

The Deer: The Five Animal Frolics (Wu Qin Xi)    

Diabetes Therapy - Exercise: Taijiquan and Qigong   

Direction of Movements in Taijiquan and Qigong

Disclaimer of the Cloud Hands Website  

Dragon Gate - Taoism - Wudang Mountain Qigong    

Eight Animals Qigong

Eight Ox Herding Songs -  A Ch'an/Zen Parable

Eight Rivers Qigong

Eight Section Brocade Ch'i Kung       

Eight Silken Treasures Qigong    

Eight Trigrams Boxing (Bagua Zhang, Pa Kua Quan)    

Eight Trigrams of the I Ching

Eight Trigrams and Taijiquan          

Eight Ways of Walking Qigong       

Embrace the One - Zhan Zhuang - Standing Like A Tree

Emptiness in Full Bloom    

Energy - Quotations    

Entering Tranquility (Ru Jing) Meditation      

Essentials of Taijiquan Movement Art

Exercise - Diabetes Therapy - Taijiquan and Qigong   

External and Internal Aspects of Chinese Martial Arts

Feedback, Kudos and Reviews for the Cloud Hand's Website     

Fitness and Well Being    

Fitness for Older Persons     

Five Animal Frolics (Wu Qin Xi): Tiger, Bear, Crane, Deer, and Monkey

Five Precepts of Buddhism     

Five Elements (Wu-Xing) and Taijiquan   

Five Stepping Movements of Taijiquan    

Flexibility and Stretching     

Five Elements (Air, Earth, Fire, Water, Metal)

Flowers

Flowers in the Sky     

Gardening: Quotes, Poems, History, Sayings

Gardening: Quips and Maxims by Michael P. Garofalo

The Four Gates: Grasping the Sparrow's Tail    

Michael P. Garofalo's Biography

Michael P. Garofalo's T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Qigong Practice    

Glossary of Taijiquan Terms in English and Chinese (Pinyin)

The Goddess - Quotations, Poems, Sayings, Prayers, Songs    

Goose - Bird - Five Animal Frolics (Wu Qin Xi)  

Goose - Wild Goose Qigong             

Grasping the Sparrow's Tail       

Green Way Blog   

Green Way Research        

Green Way Research - Taijiquan and Qigong       

Green Wizard 

Gu Shen Taijiquan Journal     

Gu Shen (Valley Spirit) Taijiquan Instructional Program

Haiku and Short Poems     

Han Shan

Hatha Yoga

Health and Fitness - T'ai Chi Ch'uan    

Hexagrams and Trigrams of the I Ching (Book of Changes)

Hidden Tiger, Beginning Program, Level 2, Valley Spirit T'ai Chi Ch'uan   

Hsing Yi Chuan   

I Ching (Book of Changes) and Taijiquan and Qigong

Index to the Cloud Hands Website   

Indoor Cycling, Stationary Bicycling, Spinning   

Instructional Program, Valley Spirit T'ai Chi Ch'uan    

Internal and External Aspects of Chinese Martial Arts

Journal - Valley Spirit Journal by Michael P. Garofalo   

Kinhin -  Walking Meditation    

Kriya Yoga    

Kudos for the Cloud Hands Website

Kundalini (Coiled Serpent) Energy

Kwang Ping Taijiquan of Kuo Lien Ying     

Labyrinths and Mazes   

Learning and Teaching Taijiquan, Qigong and Yoga

Links and Bibliography: Qigong    

Links and Bibliography: Taijiquan       

Long Form 108 Yang Style Taijiquan     

Martial Arts - Virtures

Massage  

Massage: Valley Spirit Center    Red Bluff, California

Master Chang San-Feng  (circa 1350)       

Master Cheng Man-Ch'ing  (1901 - 1975)    

Master Han Shan  (circa 750)    

Master Kuo Lien Ying   (1895-1984)     

Master Sun Lu-Tang  (1861-1932)   

Master Yang Cheng-Fu  (1883-1936)   

Mastery, Self Control, Self Mastery, Choices, Will Power, Strength of Character

Meditation - General

Meditation and Breathing

Meditation and Walking    

Meditation Instructor: Michael P. Garofalo in Red Bluff, California        

Meditation Methods and Techniques  

Meditation Quotations    

Meditation - Standing Like A Tree  

Meditation - Standing - General

Meditation - Wu Ji - The Edge of Emptiness     

Michael P. Garofalo - Brief Biography        

Michael P. Garofalo - Internal Martial Arts Practice History      

Michael P. Garofalo - Resume     

Michael P. Garofalo -  T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Qigong Practice    

Minding the Breath

Months of the Year: Quotes, Poems, Links     

Mountain Biking in Northern California    

Movement Direction Instructions for Taijiquan and Qigong Forms

Moving Hands Like Clouds:  T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Qigong    

Northern California Taijiquan and Qigong News in Cloud Hands Blog  

Northern California T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Qigong Directory: Instructors, Schools, Information  

Northwestern U.S. Tajiquan and Qigong News in Cloud Hands Blog  

Notes and Comments on the Yang Style Taijiquan     

Nature Mysticism   

Nine Movement Temple Ch'i Kung Exercise Set

Oak Tree in the Courtyard    

Old Cloud Hands Website

Older Persons Exercise and Wellness Programs   

Oregon T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Qigong Directory: Instructors, Schools, Information   

Original Cloud Hands URL    

Original Waving Hands Like Clouds URL    

Pa Kua Chang (Eight Trigrams Boxing)       

Photography - Valley Spirit Photography Gallery    

Pilates: Links, Bibliography, Resources, Quotes, Notes

Pranayama: Breathing Techniques from Yoga     

Principles of T'ai Chi Ch'uan Movement Art

Private Instruction by Michael P. Garofalo, Instructional Programs

Pulling Onions: The Quips and Maxims of a Gardener

Push Hands - T'ui Shou   

Qigong    (GWRW)

Qigong    (GDW)

Qigong: Bibliography and Links    

Qigong Blog  

Qigong - Breathwork

Qigong, Ch'i Kung - Chinese Mind-Body Exercises    

Qigong and Yoga Classes, Red Bluff, California.  Instructor:  Mike Garofalo.

Qigong for Seniors

Qigong Instructor: Michael P. Garofalo in Red Bluff, California       

Qigong: Valley Spirit Center 

Qigong-Yoga Exercise Cycle

Qigong Ruler - Taiji Chih

Qigong Walking      

Qi or Ch'i and Taijiquan   

Questions and Answers in Cloud Hands Blog    

Raja Yoga    

Red Bluff, California, Qigong Classes

Red Bluff, California, Yoga Classes   

Red Bluff, California: Valley Spirit Center 

Red Bluff, Valley Spirit Taijiquan Instructional Program    

Reiki (Ushi Shiki Ryoho) - Karen Garofalo, Reiki Practitioner    

Reiki: Valley Spirit Center    Red Bluff, California

Relaxation and Taijiquan     

Resolve, Will. Willpower, Self Control, Self Discipline   

Resume of Michael P. Garofalo

Reviews of the Cloud Hand's Website     

Riding the Ox - A Zen Parable   

Royal (Raja) Yoga

RSS Feed for the Cloud Hands Blog

Ruler - T'ai Chi   

Saber (Dao, Broadsword)  

Sacred Circles and Spheres

Self Control, Self Mastery, Choices, Will Power    

Self-Massage

Senior Citizens Fitness Programs  

Senior Fitness - Red Bluff, CA

Sensing Hands: Push Hands - T'ui Shou   

Shambhala Warriorship: Tibetan Buddhism    

Shoong, Sung, Song  - Loose, Relaxed, Open, Yielding, Responsive     

Short Form, Yang Style, Beijing Simplified 24

Silk Reeling    

Simplified 24 From, Yang Style       

Soaring Crane, Intermediate Program, Level 3, Valley Spirit T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Soulful Gardening

Speaking to the Spirit Meditation

The Spirit of Gardening    

Staff Weapons: Jo, Bo, Can, Staff, Spear    

Standard 32 Sword (Jian) Form - Yang Style   Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes.

Standing Bear, Level 1 Ranking, Valley Spirit Taijiquan

Standing Like A Tree - Zhan Zhuang

Standing Meditation (Wu Ji)   

Standing Meditation - General

Sticking Hands - T'ui Shou   

Stork - Bird - Five Animal Frolics

Strength Training    

Stretching and Flexibility

Subject Index to the Cloud Hands Website

Sun Lu-Tang's (1861-1933) Biography   

Sun Lu-Tang (1861-1933): Baguaquan, Hsingyiquan, and Taijiquan Grandmaster

Sun Style Baguaquan     

Sun Style Hsingyiquan   

Sun Style Qigong   

Sun Style Sword

Sun Style Taijiquan     

Swordsmanship and T'ai Chi Ch'uan     

Sword 32 Standard Sword (Jian) Form - Yang Style   Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes.

T'ai Chi Chuan Blog  

T'ai Ch'i Classics      

Tai Chi for Arthritis

Tai Chi for Diabetes   

Tai Chi for Seniors  

Tai Chi Chuan   (GWR)

T'ai Chi Ch'uan: Bibliography and Links     

T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Qigong Directory: Instructors, Schools, Information, Workshops      
Northern California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia

T'ai Chi Ch'uan Instructor: Michael P. Garofalo in Red Bluff, California      

T'ai Chi Ch'uan, Red Bluff, CA  

T'ai Chi Ch'uan Short Form, Beijing Simplified 24, Yang Style     

T'ai Chi Ch'uan: Links and Bibliography      

T'ai Chi Ch'uan Staff     

T'ai Chi Ch'uan Sword (Jian)     

T'ai Chi Ch'uan: Valley Spirit Center     Red Bluff, California

T'ai Chi Ruler - Chih

Taijiquan: Bibliography and Links  

Taijiquan Blog  

Taijiquan - Breathwork

Taijiquan Classics      

Taijiquan For Good Health, Fitness and Vitality         

Taijiquan Instructor: Michael P. Garofalo in Red Bluff, California        

Taijiquan Jian (Sword)     

Taijiquan - Princiles of Practice

Taijiquan: Valley Spirit Center    Red Bluff, California

Taming the Ox - A Zen Allegory or Parable     

Tantric Yoga   

Tantric Buddhism: Shambhala Warriorship, Yoga

Taoism, Nature Mysticism, Alchemy      

Taoism - Wudang Qigong    

Teaching and Learning Taijiquan, Qigong and Yoga

Temple Qigong - A Nine Movement Exercise Set     

Thirteen Postures: 8 Gates and 5 Steps      

32 Standard Sword (Jian) Form - Yang Style   Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes.            

The 300 Missing Poems of Han Shan      

Tibetan Buddhism: Shambhala Warriorship, Yoga, Tantra

The Tiger: The Five Animal Frolics (Wu Qin Xi)    

Tiger, Hidden Tiger, Beginning Program, Level 2, Valley Spirit T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Tree Qigong - Zhan Zhuang - Standing Like A Tree   

Trees - Quotations, Poems, Lore, Wisdom  

Trees - Lore, Magick, Myths, Magick    

Trigrams and Hexagrams of the I Ching (Book of Changes)  

Twelve Animals of Chinese Yoga

24 From, Yang Style, Standard       

Valley Spirit Center    Red Bluff, California

Valley Spirit Fitness and Well Being Website   

Valley Spirit Idea

Valley Spirit Journal by Michael P. Garofalo (May 2003-July 2005)     

Valley Spirit Journal by Michael P. Garofalo (August 2005- )     

Valley Spirit Labyrinths  

Valley Spirit Photography Gallery - Old      

Valley Spirit Photography Gallery - New - Coppermine      

Valley Spirit T'ai Chi Ch'uan Club        

Valley Spirit Taijiquan Instructional Program    

Valley Spirit - Green Way Blog       

Valley Spirit Taijiquan and Qigong Journal (5/2003-7/2005) by Michael P. Garofalo       

Valley Spirit Taijiquan and Qigong Journal (8/2005-) by Michael P. Garofalo       

Valley Spirit T'ai Chi Ch'uan, Qigong, and Yoga    

Valley Spirit - Tao Te Ching

Vancouver, B.C., T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Qigong Directory: Instructors, Schools     

Virtues in the Martial Arts

Vitality, Health and Qigong   

Walking and Labyrinths

Walking and Taijiquan     

Walking - Eight Ways of Walking Qigong       

Walking - General Fitness Exercise   

Walking Meditation

Walking - Quotations   

Walking: Valley Spirit Center     Red Bluff, California  

Washington T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Qigong Directory: Instructors, Schools, Information 

Waving Hands Like Clouds:  T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Qigong    

Wild Goose Qigong

Will Power, Self Control, Self Mastery, Choices, Strength of Character   

Wizards   

Wudang Mountain - Taoism, Taijiquan and Qigong    

Wudang Qigong    

Wu Ji - Standing Meditation   

Xing Yi Quan   

Yoga Class, TFFC, Red Bluff, CA   

Yang Family Taijiquan Genealogy     

Yand Style Push Hands and Da Lu   

Yang Style Saber

Yang Style Staff

Yang Style Sword    

Yang Style Traditional Taijiquan Long Form 108 Movements     

Yang Style Taijiquan - Notes and Comments     

Yang Style Taijiquan Short Form 24 Movements       

Yin-Yang Sensitivity Training: Sticking Hands - T'ui Shou   

Yoga  

Yoga Blog    

Yoga - Chinese - 12 Animals

Yoga Class, Red Bluff, CA - Instructor: Michael P. Garofalo

Yoga and Qigong Classes, Red Bluff, California.  Instructor:  Mike Garofalo.

Yoga - Breathwork   

Yoga - Hatha   

Yoga - Kriya     

Yogalates: Links, Bibliography, Resources, Quotes, Notes    

Yoga - Red Bluff, CA

Yoga -Tantric

Yoga-Taiji Index

Zhan Zhuang - Standing Like A Tree

Zen/Chan Buddhist  Poetry       

Zen Buddhist Quotations   

 

 

Valley Spirit Internal Martial Arts Club

Valley Spirit Center - Red Bluff, California

 


Red Bluff, Tehama County, North Sacramento Valley, Northern California, U.S.A.
Cities and small towns in the area: Oroville, Paradise, Durham, Chico, Hamilton City,
Corning, Rancho Tehama, Los Molinos, Vina, Tehama, Proberta, Gerber, 
Manton, Cottonwood, Olinda, Cloverdale, Dairyville, Bend, Centerville, Summit City
Anderson, Shasta Lake, Palo Cedro, Igo, Ono, Redding, Shasta, Colusa, Willows,
Richfield, Fall River, Montgomery Creek, Alturas, McCloud, Dunsmuir, Yreka, Happy Camp,
Shingletown, Burney, Mt. Shasta City, Weaverville, Williams, Chester, Orland,
Susanville, Weed, Gridley, Marysville, Yuba City, NorCalifia, CA, California.

 

 

December 10, 2006

 

Green Way Research   

Valley Spirit T'ai Chi Ch'uan

Cloud Hands: T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Ch'i Kung     

 

Cloud Hands: Taijiquan and Qigong Blog

 

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