32 Sword Form
Standard 32 Movements Taijiquan Sword Form
Chinese
National Physical Education Committee 1957 Orthodox 32 Swordplay Form
A Simplified Standardized Sword Form in the Yang Style of T'ai Chi Ch'uan Swordplay
Taijiquan Jian or T'ai Chi Ch'uan Chien (Gim): The Double-Edged Straight Chinese Sword

Research by
Michael P. Garofalo

Bibliography     Links     List of Movements     Quotations     13 Sword Techniques     Learning

Analysis and Descriptions of the Movements of the 32 Sword Form

Comparison of the 32 and 55 Sword Forms in the Yang Style

T'ai Chi Ch'uan Straight Double-Edged Sword - General All Styles 

  Yang Taijiquan Sword     Chen Taijiquan Sword     Wudang Sword Forms    Sun Taji Sword

 

 


Jian - Sword

 

 

October 2, 2011
© Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Green Way Research, 2006-2011, Red Bluff, California
Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

 

 

Disclaimer

Warning:  Practicing with Sword Weapons Can Be a Dangerous Activity for Adults

 

 

Cloud Hands - Yun Shou

Cloud Hands Homepage

 

太极拳 劍 楊氏

 

 

 

 

Bibliography, Links, Resources
T'ai Chi Ch'uan Standardized (Orthodox) Simplified 32 Movements Sword (Jian) Form

© Michael P. Garofalo, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008. 

 

A Note to Readers:  The Cloud Hands website has been online continuously since 2001.  In this past year, 2007, over 1,041,000 webpages (excluding graphics) were served to readers around the world from the Cloud Hands website.  Since 2005, I have also provided an associated blog to point to changes and additions at the Cloud Hands website:  The Cloud Hands: Mind/Body Movement Arts Blog.  Since Cloud Hands is a very well-established and stable website, it provides readers with a good and secure starting point for their online research into Taijiquan and Qigong.  The Cloud Hands website is funded entirely by Green Way Research, with volunteer efforts by Michael P. Garofalo
    Unfortunately, as everyone knows, many other websites and webpages appear and then disappear from the Internet scene.  Authors do not pay to keep up their web hosting services, loose a "free hosting" option, change filenames, or decide to remove webpages for various reasons.  Consequently, links to some good webpages become invalid and the files are no longer found on the Internet.  You may find a some of these "dead links" to nonexistent webpages cited below; and, there is no way to avoid this troublesome situation.  For this reason, when you do find a good and useful webpage, be sure to save the webpage to a folder on your hard drive or server. 
    I welcome and encourage your suggestions for how to improve this webpage.  Your comments, ideas, contributions, and constructive criticism are encouraged.  Send your suggestions to my email box.

 

Alphabetical Index to the Cloud Hands Taijiquan Website 


Analysis and Descriptions of 32 Movements of Standardized (Orthodox) Simplified 32 Movement Sword Form

     Part One:  Movements/Postures 1 - 8

     Part Two:  Movements/Postures 9 -16 

     Part Three: Movements/Postures 17-24

     Part Four: Movements/Postures 25-32 

     Movements 1-32, List     


The Art of Chinese Swordmanship: The Manual of Taiji Jian.  By Yun Zhang.  New York, Weatherhill, 1998.  287 pages.  ISBN: 0834804123.  Sifu Yun
Xhang was a student of Grandmaster Wang Peisheng (Ying Cheng).  A 32 movement Wu short Jian form, by Wang Peisheng is taught.  VSCL.  This is an good book on Taijiquan Jian!    


Bagua Zhang Swordsmanship  


A Brief Introduction to Practicing Taiji Sword.  By Li Tianji. 


Broadsword (Dao): Links, Bibliography, Styles, Guides, Lists of Movements  


Broadsword (Dao) - Techniques 


Cane, Zhang, Short Staff, Jo, Hanbo, Gun Weapons and Exercise Methods, JoDo, Zhang Quan


Chen Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan Swordsmanship:  Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes 


Chen Style Taijiquan   


Chi Kung, Qigong: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Resources, Notes, Instructions 


Chinese Swordsmanship: The Yang Family Taiji Jian Traditions.  By Scott M. Rodell.  Annandale, Virginia, Seven Stars Books and Video, 2003.  304 pages.   Introduction, sword traditions,  history, safety, Yang classical form and Michuan Taiji fighting system.   Review   ISBN: 0974399906.   The Michuan Jian form is meticulously described and photographed and applications shown on pages 73-184, and the Public Yang Jian is likewise described on pages 185-257.  Applications and swordplay with partners are covered.  The basic Jian cuts are explained on pages 41-64.  Scott Rodell online.  It is sometimes difficult to see the details in the small black and white photographs.  The movements are unnumbered.  VSCL. 


Chinese Swordsmen


Classical Tai Chi Sword.  By Petra Kobayashi, Toyo Kobayashi, and Chiang Tao Chi.  Charles E. Tuttle, 2003.   176 pages.  ISBN: 0804834482.  Useful explanation of the 53 movement Yang style sword form.  Clear photographs with directional/movement arrows for each of the 53 movements.  Good detailed descriptions for each movement.  VSCL.   


Classical Tai Chi Sword, List of Movements, Yang Style, 55 Movements, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List,.Detailed, 34 pages  


Classical Tai Chi Sword, List of Movements, Yang Style, 55 Movements, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List, Simple List, 2 pages  


Classical Tai Chi Chuan Sword, Taijiquan Jian 55 in the Yang Style: Comparison of Names or Descriptions for the 55 Movements.”  Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  This document includes a detailed listing of the names or brief descriptions of the 55 movements of the Classical Taijiquan Straight Sword Form in the Yang Style of Taijiquan.  This document includes names or brief descriptions for each movement in English, Romanized Chinese (Pinyin and/or Wade Giles), Chinese characters, Spanish, French, and German.  The document includes source citations and a bibliography.  In PDF format, print only, 267Kb, 34 pages:
Webpage: http://www.egreenway.com/taichichuan/Classical Taijiquan Yang Sword Form 55 List Detailed.pdf 


Classical 13 Sword Techniques


Cloud Hands Blog: Swordplay Posts


Cloud Hands: Taijiquan and Qigong 


Comparison of 32 Sword Form with 53 Yang Form 


Dao, Broadsword - Techniques


Fourth Dan Tai Chi 32 Sword.  DVD.  Demonstration by Li Hui. 


Google Searches:  Sword Tai Chi 32 Movements, Standard 32 Sword Form  


Great Star of the Literary God, Chief Star, Big Dipper   Symbolism, Lore, Myths. 


Hsing I Quan Swordsmanshsip  


Instructional Video Online - 32 Sword Form


Index to the Cloud Hands Website 


Jian -  Wikipedia 


Learning the 32 Sword Form On Your Own at Home 


Li Deyin 32 Taiji Jian.   2 DVDs.  "Taiji Sword is one of short weaponry routines of tai chi boxing integrated with tai chi boxing and swordplay techniques. 32-form taiji sword was adapted from Yang-Style Tai Chi Sword by Chinese martial arts master Li Tianji.  The set of routines is dissected in 2 sections, 2 returns and 32 movements. The 32-form taiji sword was supported by the National Physical Education Committee."  CGC Mall  


Line drawings (black and white illustrations) of all the movements in the standard 32 sword form. 


List of Movements, Classical Taijiquan Sword, Yang Style, 55 Movements, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List   34 pages. 


List of Movements in the 32 Sword Form  


List of Movements in the 32 Sword Form - In Chinese 


List of Movements in the Classical Yang Style 55 Movements Sword Form    PDF, Print, 34 pages.
 

List of Movements, First Half, Movements 1 -16, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List  


List of Movements of 32 Sword on the Tai Chi Sword Page 


List of Movements of 32 Sword from Valley Spirit Taijiquan  PDF, Print, 1 Page.


List of Movements of 32 Sword Form from Stanford University


List of Movements of 32 Sword, 61 black and white illustrations


List of Movements for the 32 Sword from Tai Chi Sword Form 


Names of Movements in the 32 Tai Chi Sword Form


100 Days of Swordsmanship.  A blog by Charlie in Boston. 


Online Instructional Video of 32 Sword Form  


Origin of Yang Family Jian.  By Dave Chesser. 


Orthodox Taiji Sword.  Instructional VHS videotape.  Presented by Madam Wang Ji Yung.  108 minutes.  Step by step teaching of the 32 Form sword set.  Produced by Vecom Development Co..  Includes a 26 page instructional booklet titled "The Orthodox Chinese Tai Ji Sword."  Versions in Mandarin, Cantonese, Japanese and English.  Madame Wang is the Vice Chairman of the Chinese Wushu Association, and Professor at the Shanghai Wushu Investigation Laboratory.   Distributed by Wayfarer.  Chinese Health Video-Cassettes, # 502.  No year of publication given.  VSCL.   


Orthodox (Standardized) Simplified 32 Form, List of Movements, Complete 1-32, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List (PDF format)


Qigong, Chi Kung: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Resources, Notes, Instructions 


Qigong: Taijiquan Sword. 
Taiji Sword, Classical Yang Style: The Complete Form, Qigong and Applications.  By Yang, Jwing-Ming. 


Relaxation (Sung) in Tai Chi Chuan 


Ripening Peaches:  Daoist Studies and Practices.  Taoist scriptures, bibliography, Quanzhen Daoism, Neidan, gardening, tea, history, qigong/daoyin, readings, etc. 


Saber (Dao) Tai Chi Chuan: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes  


Simplified Standard 32 Taiji Sword Form List of Movements from Valley Spirit Taijiquan  PDF, Print, 1 Page.


Simplified Tai Chi Sword Form 32.  Instructional DVD or videocassette.  60 minutes.  Instruction by Master Jesse Tsao, from San Diego, CA.  Tai Chi HealthwaysVideo online version.   No date of publication provided.  The 32 sword form is taught in 8 lessons.  Demonstrations of the entire form from front and back views.  Each lesson consists of:  a) demonstration of 3 or 4 movements with English subtitles, b)  clear, slow, and detailed instructions in English of each component of each movement with multiple demonstrations, and c) continuous demonstration of all movements in the lesson in normal speed with front and side views.  Very nice park setting in the background.  For each lesson, the sound is clear, with ample volume, and the English is quite understandable.  Chinese music is in the background during the continuous demonstrations.  My three favorite instructional DVDs or VHS videotapes for the 32 sword form are by Paul Lam, Jesse Tsao, and
Jiang Jian-ye. VSCL. 


Simplified Tai Chi Sword 32 Form.  Instructional DVD.  By Master Guangzhi Xing.  Includes 24 Short Form, Yang Style, instruction.  Tai Chi for Life.  Turtle Press.  VSCL. 


Simplified 32 Taiji Sword in the Yang Style.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  This popular webpage includes a comprehensive bibliography, scores of links to webpages, an extensive listing of the names and name variations for each movement (English and Chinese), a detailed analysis of each posture and movement sequence with explanations and numbered illustrations, instructions, selected quotations, sword techniques, a comprehensive media bibliography, and a comparison of the 32 and 55 sword forms in the Yang style.  © Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008. 


Solo Practice Methods
 

Staff Weapons (Jo, Bo, Gun) : Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes  


Subject Index to the Cloud Hands Taijiquan Website 


Suggestions, Ideas, Comments, Contributions to this Webpage 


Sun Lu Tang's Internal Martial Arts: Baguazhang, Xingyiquan, Taijiquan, and Qigong.  Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Resources, Instructions.   


Sun Style of T'ai Chi Ch'uan: Standard Competition 73 Movements Form.  Research by Michael P. Garofalo, M.S..  Webpage: 450Kb, June 2008.  This webpage includes an introduction, information on the history of the Sun Taijiquan forms, a detailed bibliography, extensive links, references to video resources, a large collections of quotations about Sun Taijiquan, recommendations on the best media resources on the topic, and suggestions for learning the 73 competition Sun Taijiquan form.  A detailed comparative list of the names of each of the 73 movements is provided, with source references, and the movement names are given in English, Chinese, Chinese characters, French, German, and Spanish.  This webpage includes detailed descriptions of each of the 73 movements with black and white illustrations for each movement sequence along with commentary and comparisons.  Many additional nomenclature lists and section study charts in the PDF format, photographs and graphics are also provided - over 1.3 MB of information.  This webpage is the most detailed and complete document on the subject of the Sun Taijiquan Competition 73 Form available on the Internet.  This document was published by  Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California, 2008.   URL: http://www.egreenway.com/taichichuan/sun73.htm.


Sun Style Taijiquan Swordsmanship   Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes 


The Sword Form: Flying Through Myth and Legend.  By Audi Peal. 


Sword Forms, T'ai Chi Ch'uan: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes    


Sword Techniques:  Taijiquan Broadsword (Saber, Ox Tail Broadsword, Dao)   Chen Taijiquan Dao, Yang Taijiquan Dao, Wushu Competition Dao


Tai Chi Sword.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  This popular webpage includes a comprehensive bibliography, scores of links to webpages; an extensive listing of the names and name variations for each movement  in English, Chinese, French, German, and Spanish; a detailed analysis of each posture and movement sequence with explanations and numbered illustrations and detailed instructions; selected quotations; comments on 20 Taijiquan sword techniques; a comprehensive media bibliography; a chart of performance times; and, a comparison of the 32 and 55 sword forms in the Yang style.  This is the standard, simplified, orthodox, 1957, 32 Taiji Sword Form, in the Yang Style of Taijiquan. This is the standard, simplified, orthodox, 1957, 32 Taiji Sword Form, in the Yang Style of Taijiquan. © Michael P. Garofalo, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008.  245Kb+. 


Tai Chi Sword   By Dan McGrath.  List of movement names and comments. 


Tai Chi Sword.  Instructional DVD.  Master Tang Lai Wei.  Includes applications of 32 sword form. 


T'ai Chi Ch'uan Sword Forms: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes   By Mike Garofalo.  130Kb+. 


Tai Chi Sword   Yang Tai Chi, Chen Tai Chi, and Wushu Styles. 


Tai Chi Sword.  Instructional videotape.  Presentation by Master Liang, Shou-Yu.  Directed by Wu, Wen-Ching.  1999.  VHS.   ISBN:  1889659053.  60 minutes. Multiple demonstrations of each movement section of the 32 Form taiji sword routine.  Wayfarer


Tai Chi Sword.  A detailed analysis of the official Tai Chi Sword form. Clear instruction is also provided in basic double-edged sword techniques. An introduction to two person sword fencing is included.   Poster and instructional DVD.  Master Mark.  CWRI Tai Chi Arts Association. 


Tai Chi Sword.  By Dan McGrath.  10Kb


Tai Chi Sword Blog  By Cheng Zhao.   


Tai Chi Sword Form


Tai Chi Sword Page 


Tai Chi Sword: The 32 Simplified Forms.   By Guangqi, Li; Chen, Zhao PhD; and Don G. Shao (Compiler).  Agilceed Books, England, 2006.  176 pages.  ISBN: 0976118327.  Simple and clear line drawings.  Large but mediocre quality photos.  Large print style of text.  Fairly clear, but brief explanations of each movement sequence.  Questions and answers.  References.  List of movement names: literal, figurative, and in Chinese.  Brief commentary on Tai Chi swordplay.  As far as I know now, the only book in print on the subject in English.  Available from Amazon.  VSCL. 


Tai Chi: The 32 Sword Forms.  Instructional DVD and VHS videotape.  Presentation by Dr. Paul Lam.  ASIN: B00005U59Y.  95 minutes.  Step by step teaching, slow and normal speeds, multiple views.  Includes demonstration of the 48 Form set.  East Action Video, Narwee, Australia, 1996.  The teaching is done indoors in a nice studio with excellent lighting.  Dr. Lam has his students slowly demonstrate the movements as he describes in detail how the movements are to be done.  Then Dr. Lam demonstrates the movement slowly from a front view.  Then the student demonstrates the movement from both front, side and back views at normal speed.  All instruction is in English, with good clear audio, ample volume, and very understandable.  The 32 sword form is demonstrated by Dr. Lam with front and back views.  My three favorite instructional DVDs or VHS videotapes for the 32 sword form are by Paul Lam, Jesse Tsao, and
Jiang Jian-ye. VSCL. 


Taiji Sword and Other Writings .  By Chen, Wei-Ming.  Translated by Barbara Davis.  Berkeley, California, North  Atlantic Books, 2000.  Bibliography, 93 pages. ISBN: 1556433336.  On pages 71-72 is a list of the Taiji Sword postures, 55 movements, from Chen Wei Ming with numbering provided by Barbara Davis. 


Taiji Sword, Classical Yang Style: The Complete Form, Qigong and Applications.  By Yang, Jwing-Ming.  Edited by James C. O'Leary.  Boston, Mass., YMAA Publications, 1999.  Index, glossary, list of form postures, 205 pages.  ISBN: 1886969744.  VSCL.  The standard 53 Yang sword form.      


Taiji Sword, Classical Yang Style, 55 Movements: List of Movements 


Taiji Sword, Classical Yang Style: The Complete Form, Qigong and Applications.  Instructional VHS videotape.  Presented by Yang, Jwing-Ming.  YMAA Publications, 1999.  82 minutes.  ISBN: 1886969817.  The standard 53 Yang sword form.   


Taijiquan.  By Li Deyin.  London, Singing Dragon, 2004, 2008.  In English.  402 pages.  ISBN: 9781848190047, 1848190042.  Includes a complimentary DVD.  Includes descriptions, with photographs, of the 81 Yang Taijiquan form, Simplified 24 Taijiquan, Competition 42 Taijiquan, Competition 42 Taiji Sword, and the 32 Taiji Sword. 


Taijijian - Wikipedia   


Taijiquan Jian: Secuencia Simplificada de 32 Formas.   List of movements in Spanish.  Descriptions of movements in Spanish with black and white illustrations.  


Techniques - Broadsword


Techniques - Sword


13 Sword Techniques 


13 Taijijian Techniques (13 Tai Chi Sword Techniques).  Research by Michael P. Garofalo.  Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, 2008.  1.  Ji  击
  Strike, hit, break attack, beat, stroke.  2.  Ci  刺   Trust, pierce, sting, prick, stab.  Ge  割   Cut off, Divide, Block Off, Sever, Quarter, Obstruct, Scroll, Blocking.  4.  Xi  洗  Brush Off, Sweep Away, Wash Off, Clean Off.  5.  Chou  抽  Pull Out, Cut Out, Extract.  6. Dai  带   Carry, Leading, Deflecting, Slicing, Lead, Carrying.  7.  Ti  提  Upwards Stroke, Lifting Up, Lift, To Carry Up.  8.  Dian  点  Point, Dot, Spot, Poke.  9.  Peng  迸   Burst Forth, Split Open, Tipping, Gush Out, Burst, Wardoff.   10.  Pi    Split, Hack, Chop, Split Open, Chopping, Cut Apart, Split, Splitting.  11.  Jie  截   Cut Off, Stop, Obstruct, Cutting, Intercept.  12.  Jiao    Stir, Stirring, Mix, Disturb, Agitate.  13.  Ya  搅  Press, Pressing, Press Down, Push Down, Crush, Pressure. 


32 Movements Yang Style Tai Chi Sword.  Videocassette. 


32 Step Tai Chi Sword.  Tai Chi Place.  3 different listings of the names for the 32 form.  This webpage includes an earlier version of the list which I prepared for this webpage.  


32 Step Tai Chi Sword.  By Jiang Jian-ye.  Instructional VHS videotape.  Step by step teaching and demonstrations.  90 minutes.   Jiang's Tai Chi Videos.  
My three favorite instructional DVDs or VHS videotapes for the 32 sword form are by Paul Lam, Jesse Tsao, and Jiang Jian-ye.  VSCL.  


32 Step Taiji Sword Form.  Demonstrated by Chen Sitan.  3:00 minutes.  Includes names in English and Chinese, and numbering.  UTube Video. 


32 Sword Form.  Line drawing of all movements in the 32 sword form. 


32 Sword Form, Simplified, Yang Style, Taijiquan Jian.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  This popular webpage includes a comprehensive bibliography, scores of links to webpages; an extensive listing of the names and name variations for each movement  in English, Chinese, French, German, and Spanish; a detailed analysis of each posture and movement sequence with explanations and numbered illustrations and detailed instructions; selected quotations; comments on 20 Taijiquan sword techniques; a comprehensive media bibliography; a chart of performance times; and, a comparison of the 32 and 55 sword forms in the Yang style.  This is the standard, simplified, orthodox, 1957, 32 Taiji Sword Form, in the Yang Style of T'ai Chi Ch'uan.  © Michael P. Garofalo, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008.  245Kb+. 


Symbolism and Lore about the Taijiquan Sword Postures

     Great Star of the Literary God, Chief Star, Big Dipper


32 Sword Form Chart   Laminated Wall Chart


32 Sword Form, List of Movements, Complete 1-32, Valley Spirit Taijiquan   PDF, Print, 1 Page.


Traditional Yang Style Taijiquan 67 Movement Sword Form - List of Postures  This is the version of the Taiji sword form currently taught by Master Yang Jun (1968-), 6th generation, head of the International Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan Association.  He was taught this sword form by his grandfather, Yang Zhen Duo (1926-, 4th generation). 

 


Videos Online - 32 Standard Sword Form


Simplified Tai Chi Sword Form 32  4:48 minutes   Master Jesse Tsao.  Sample of instructional DVD. 


Simplified Tai Chi Sword Form 32  4:48 minutes  Master Jess Tsao.  Sample of instructional DVD. 


Simplified Tai Chi Sword   3:30 minutes. 


Tai Chi 32 Sword.  UTube, 4:09 minutes.  11Aug2007.  Man in forest setting. 


Taiji Sword 32 三十二式太极剑   UTube, 3:02 minutes. 


Tai Chi Sword, Traditional Yang Style, 54 Forms   4:33 minutes. 


32 Point Sword Form Video  3:04 minutes   MetaCafe 


32 Step Taiji Sword Form.  Demonstrated by Chen Sitan.  3:00 minutes.  Includes names and numbering.  UTube Video. 


32 Sword Form   3:04 minutes  YouTube  Demonstrated by Simone Sabistiani. 


32 Sword Form.  Demonstrated by Taiji sword master Xue An Ri.  3:45 minutes.  UTube Video. 


32 Sword Form, Simplified, T'ai Chi Ch'uan, Yang Style.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  This popular webpage includes a comprehensive bibliography, scores of links to webpages; an extensive listing of the names and name variations for each movement  in English, Chinese, French, German, and Spanish; a detailed analysis of each posture and movement sequence with explanations and numbered illustrations and detailed instructions; selected quotations; comments on 20 Taijiquan sword techniques; a comprehensive media bibliography; a chart of performance times; and, a comparison of the 32 and 55 sword forms in the Yang style.  © Michael P. Garofalo, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008.  245Kb+. 


32 Tai Chi Sword.  UTube, 1:35


32 Taiji Sword Show, Vancouver, 2007.  AOL Video, 2:38. 


Way of the Short Staff.  By Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.  A comprehensive guide to the practice of the short staff, cane, jo, walking stick, gun, zhang, whip staff, 13 Hands Staff, and related wood short staff weapons.  A detailed and annotated guide, bibliography, lists of links, resources, instructional media, online videos, and lessons.   Includes use of the short staff and cane in martial arts, self-defense, walking and hiking.  Separate sections on Aikido Jo, Cane, Taijiquan cane and staff, Jodo, exercises with a short staff, selected quotations, techniques, selecting and purchasing a short staff, tips and suggestions, and a long section on the lore, legends, and magick of the short staff.  Includes "Shifu Miao Zhang Points the Way."  Published by Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California.  Updated on a regular basis since October, 2008.  Filesize: 275 Kb.  Related to Mike's popular webpage on the Staff.


Yang Style Taiji Sword (32 Forms) 楊式太極劍  2:45  UTube Video, Demonstration. 


Yang Tai Chi DVD.  Master Xing.  1 minute

 


 

Valley Spirit Center Taijiquan   Red Bluff, California. 


VSCL =  Valley Spirit Center Library of Mike Garofalo


Yang Style Sword Form, Classical Tai Chi Sword, List of Movements, 55 Movements, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List


Yang Style Sword Form, 55 Movements, Taijiquan: Bibliography, Links, Resources, List, Quotes, Notes


Yang Style Sword Form, Comparison of 32 and 53 Forms 


Yang Style, Standard (Orthodox) Simplified 32 Sword Form, List of 32 Movements, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List


Yang Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan Swordsmanship: Bibliography, Links, Quotes, Notes 


Yang Style Tai Chi Sword, Classical, List of Movements, 55 Movements, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List,.Detailed, 34 pages  
Classical Tai Chi Chuan Sword, Taijiquan Jian 55 in the Yang Style: Comparison of Names or Descriptions for the 55 Movements.”  Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  This document includes a detailed listing of the names or brief descriptions of the 55 movements of the Classical Taijiquan Straight Sword Form in the Yang Style of Taijiquan.  This document includes names or brief descriptions for each movement in English, Romanized Chinese (Pinyin and/or Wade Giles), Chinese characters, Spanish, French, and German.  The document includes source citations and a bibliography.  In PDF format, print only, 267Kb, 34 pages:
Webpage: http://www.egreenway.com/taichichuan/Classical Taijiquan Yang Sword Form 55 List Detailed.pdf 


Yang Style Tai Chi Sword, Classical, List of Movements, 55 Movements, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List, Simple List, 2 pages  


Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan 3: The 32 Movement Yang Tai Chi Chuan Sword Form.  DVD, 50 minutes.  Featuring Grandmaster Doc Fai Wong.  Plum Blossom Instructional Videos.


Yang Taijiquan Long 108 Hand Form 


Yang Taijiquan Standard Simplified 24 Hand Form


 

 

Return to the Main Index on this Webpage

 

 

 

 

 

Jian Shu - Swordsmanship

 

 

 

List of Movements
32 Movement Standard Simplified T'ai Chi Ch'uan Sword Form

 

© Michael P. Garofalo, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008. 

List of Movements, Complete 1-32, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List (PDF format)

On Guard Position, Beginning Stance, Standing in Readiness, Preparation,
Starting Form, Opening Posture, 預備式:
 

 

1.  Three Rings Around the Moon  

Right Bow Stance, Cross Step and Open Arms, Place Feet Together and Point Sword Down 
Three Rings Around the Moon: Brush Knee, Immortal Points the Way, Dragonfly Touches the Water
Dragonfly Dips Water 
Point Sword with Feet Together
Circling the Moon Three Times
Stand with Feet Together and Point 
Three Rings Around the Moon  [PL] 
Dragonfly Touching Water  [JT] 
Point Sword with Closing Steps  [GLCZ] 
Three Rings Around the Moon  [MG1] 
Three Rings Circle the Moon [MPG 2] 
San Huan Tao Yue  (Ch.) 
Trois Anneaux Entourent la Lune
  (Fr.) 
Drei Ringe Kreisen den Mond
  (Gr.)
Tres Anillos Circundan la Luna  (Sp.)
三環套月 : Three Rings Circle the Moon

 

2.  The Big Dipper

Standing on Right Leg, Thrusting the Sword   
Thrust Backward Independently 
Big Dipper Constellation
The Evil Deity Standing on One Leg 
Stand on One Leg and Thrust  
One-Leg Stance, Circle and Chop Down|
Standing on One Leg to Thrust  [PL] 
Big Dipper  [JT] 
Opposite Pierce with One-Leg Stand  [GLCZ] 
The Big Dipper  [MG1, MG2] 
Da Kui Xing, Kui Xing Shi  (Ch.)  
La Constellation De Grand Huit  (Fr.)
Die Wagen-Konstellation  (Gr.) 
La Constelación Del Cucharón Grande  (Sp.)
大魁星 : Big Chief Star
魁星势 : Big Dipper   
Symbolism and Lore about the Big Dipper Posture

 

3.  The Swallow Skims Across the Water  

Cut Down Right, Crouch Down, Sweep Sword from Low Right to High Left, Step into Right Bow Stance
Sweep the Sword with Falling Step
Swallow Skims Over the Pond 
Sweep Sword in Crouch 
Crouch Stance and Sweep to the Side 
Swallow Flying Over the Water
Swallow Skimming Across the Water  [PL] 
Swallow Skimming Across Water  [JT] 
Crouch Down and Sweep Sword  [GLCZ]
The Sallow Skims Across the Water  [MG1, MG2]
Yan Zi Chao Shui  (Ch.)  
L'hirondelle Écrčme ŕ Travers L'eau  (Fr.) 
Die Schwalbe Gleitet über dem Wasser  (Gr.)
El Trago Desnata a Través del Agua (Sp.)
燕子抄水 : The Swallow Dips Its Beak in the Water

 

4.  Block and Sweep to the Right   

Slice Horizontally Right, Intercept and Block Sword to the Right Side, Left Bow Stance
Looking for a Snake in the Grass to the Right Side
Sweep to the Right 
Right Block and Sweep 
Swallow Moving Right 
Obstruct and Sweep Right 
Carry Sword to the Right  
Level Bringing to the Right
Detain and Come Forward Right
Horizontal Draw to the Right 
Carrying Sword to the Right  [PL, JT] 
Right Slice with Bow Stance  [GLCZ]
Block and Sweep to the Right  [MG1, MG2]  
You Lan Sao  (Ch.)  
Bloc et Champ vers la Droite
  (Fr.) 
Lenken Sie ab und Schleife Rechts  (Gr.) 
Bloque y Barrido a la Derecha  (Sp.)
右边拦扫 : Block and Sweep, Right
右边拦扫 : Block and Sweep, Right, You Bian Lan Sao
左右攔掃 : Left Sweep and Right Sweep   
Techniques:  Dai (Deflecting), Xi (Catching), and Chou (Cutting)  

 

5.  Block and Sweep to the Left    

Slice Horizontally Left, Intercept and Block Sword to the Left Side, Right Bow Stance
Looking for a Snake in the Grass to the Left
Sweep to the Left 
Left Block and Sweep 
Swallow Moving Left 
Obstruct and Sweep Left 
Carry Sword to the Left  
Level Bringing to the Left
Detain and Come Forward Left
Horizontal Draw to the Left 
Carrying Sword to the Left  [PL, JT] 
Left Slice with Bow Stance  [GLCZ]
Block and Sweep to the Left  [MG1, MG2]  
Zou Lan Sao  (Ch.) 
Bloc et Champ vers la Gauche  (Fr.)
Lenken Sie ab und Schleife Nach Links  (Gr.) 
Bloque y Barrido a la Izquierda  (Sp.)
左右攔掃 : Left Sweep and Right Sweep
左边拦扫 : Block and Sweep, Left  
Techniques:  Dai (Deflecting), Xi (Catching), and Chou (Cutting)  

 

6.  Searching the Sea  

Stand on Right Leg, Left Knee Up, Chop Down with Sword, Point Sword Down
The Little Dipper
Little Chief Star  
Split Independently
Single Leg Stance Reaching into the Sea
Stand on One Leg and Cut with Arm Swing 
One-Leg Stance, Circle, and Chop Down 
Sounding the Sea  [PL] 
Searching the Sea  [JT] 
Wheel Chop Sword with One-leg Stand  [GLCZ]
Searching the Sea  [MG1]
The Little Star of the Big Dipper  [MG2]
Xiao Kui Xing  (Ch.) 
Le Peu Tiennent le Premier Rôle de la Constellation de Grand Huit  (Fr.) 
Der Kleine Stern der Wagen-Konstellation  (Gr.)    
La Pequeńa Estrella de la Constelación del Cucharón Grande  (Sp.)
小魁星 : Little Star of Dipper
夜叉探海  
TechniquesYa (Pressing or Pushing Down), and Chou (Cutting Upward)

 

7.  Holding the Moon   

Drawing Sword to Left Hip, Turn Body to Side, Left Leg Empty Stance
Draw Back with T Step
Pull Back Sword with T-Stance
Sword Withdraws and Feet Retire
Withdraw Sword in T-Step
T-Stance and Pull Back 
Step Back and Withdraw Sword 
Embrace the Moon
Holding the Moon with the Arms 
Withdrawing Sword in Empty Stance  [PL]
Embracing the Moon  [JT] 
Step Back and Pull Sword  [GLCZ]
Holding the Moon  [MG1]  
Holding the Moon in the Arms  [MG2]   
Huai Zhong Bao Yue  (Ch.)
Tenir la Lune dans les Bras  (Fr.)
Umklammern des Mondes zum Busen  (Gr.)
Sostener la Luna en Los Brazos  (Sp.)
懷中抱月 : Clasp the Moon to the Bosom

 

8.  The Bird Returns to the Tree at Dusk   

Stand on Right Leg, Left Knee Up, Thrust Sword Forward and Up with Two Hands  
Sleepy Birds Returning to the Forest
The Birds Return to the Forest Trees at Dusk 
Split Upward Independently 
Evening Birds Returning to the Forest
Stand On One Leg and Thrust   
One-Leg Stance and Stab Up
Birds Returning to the Tree at Dusk  [PL,JT] 
Upward Pierce Sword with One-Leg Stand  [GLCZ]
The Bird Returns to the Tree at Dusk  [MG1] 
The Bird Flies Into the Forest  [MG2] 
Su Niao Tou Lin  (Ch.) 
L'oiseau Vole dans la Foręt  (Fr.)
Der Vogel Fliegt in den Wald  (Gr.)
El Pájaro Vuela en el Bosque  (Sp.)
宿鳥投林 : Sleepy Birds Return to Forest
宿鸟投林 : Birds Lodging in the Forest  

 

9.  The Black Dragon Whips His Tail     

Draw Sword Back and Up to Left, Sweep Downward/Horizontally to Right, Right Leg Empty Stance
Dragon Sweeping Tail
Sever Downward with Empty Step  
Black Dragon Swings His Tail 
Plunge Sword Downward in Empty Stance
Empty Stance and Intercept Downward 
Dragon Sweeping Tail  [PL,JT]  
Empty Stance and Slice Downward  [GLCZ]
The Black Dragon Whips His Tail  [MG1, MG2] 
Su Niao Tou Lin  (Ch.) 
Le Dragon Noir Fouette Sa Queue  (Fr.) 
Der Schwarze Drache Peitscht Sein Endstück  (Gr.) 
El Dragón Negro Azota Su Cola  (Sp.)
烏龍擺尾 : Black Dragon Whips Its Tail     
乌龙摆尾 : Black Dragon Swings Tail

 

10.  The Green Dragon Emerges from the Water    

Stab Forward, Step Back to Right Side, Stab Forward, Step to Left Leg Bow Stance
Blue Dragon Out of Water
Split with Left Bow Step  
Green Dragon Emerges from the Water
Green Dragon Coming Out of the Water   
Thrust in Left Bow Stance 
Left Bow Stance and Stab 
Green Dragon Emerging from Water  [PL, JT] 
Pierce with Left Bow Stance  [GLCZ]
The Green Dragon Emerges from the Water  [MG1, MG2]
Qing Long Chu Shui  (Ch.) 
Le Dragon Vert Émerge de L'eau  (Fr.) 
El Dragón Verde Emerge del Agua  (Sp.)
Der Grüne Drache Taucht vom Wasser Auf  (Gr.)
青龙出水 :  Green Dragon Comes Out of the Water 
青龍出水 : Green Dragon Emerges from the Water
绿色龙从水出来    

 

11.  Turning Around and Carrying the Sword    

Turn the Body Clockwise, Bring Sword Diagonally and Slice, Right Leg Bow Stance   
Wind Curls Up Lotus Leaves  
The Wind Blowing the Lotus Leaves
Turn the Body and Draw on a Slant 
Lotus Swirls Around in the Wing 
Turning Round and Carrying Sword  [PL] 
Wing Curling the Lotus Leaves  [JT] 
Pull-back Turn and Skew Slice Sword  [GLCZ]
Turning Round and Carrying Sword  [MG1] 
The Wind Blows the Lotus Leaves  [MG2]   
Feng Juan He Ye  (Ch.) 
Le Vent Souffle les Feuilles de Lotus  (Fr.) 
Der Wind Brennt die Lotos-Blätter Durch  (Gr.) 
El Viento Sopla las Hojas del Loto  (Sp.)
風捲荷葉 : Wind Blows the Lotus Leaf   
风卷荷叶 : Lotus Swirls Around in the Wind

 

12.  The Lion Shakes His Mane    

Stab Diagonal Right, Shrink Back, Step into Right Leg Empty Stance, Stab Horizontal with Two Hands
Bring Diagonally, Shrinking 
Retreat and Carry the Sword
The Lion Shakes Its Head  
The Lion Shakes His Mane
Lion Nods Head
Contract the Body and Draw on a Diagonal 
Stepping Back and Carrying Sword  [PL] 
Lion Turning Head  [JT]   
Contract Body and Skew Slice Sword   [GLCZ]
The Lion Shakes His Mane  [MG1, MG2] 
Feng Juan He Ye, Zhi Zi Yao Tou   (Ch.) 
Le Lion Secoue Sa Tęte  (Fr.)
Der Löwe Rüttelt Seinen Kopf  (Gr.)
El León Sacudare Su Cabeza  (Sp.)
夜叉探海 : Lion Shakes Its Head   
狮子摇头 : Lion Shakes Its Head 

 

13.  The Tigress Holds Her Head   

Step Back and Open Arms, Stand on Left Leg, Stab Forward with Two Hands
Sword Taken Up and Knees Lifted  
Tiger Holds Its Head  
Holding the Tiger's Head
Lift Knee and Hold Sword with Both Hands 
Tiger Holds Its Head Between Its Paws
Raise the Knee and Hold the Sword  
Tiger Holding Head  [PL, JT] 
Raise Knee and Hold Sword  [GLCZ]
The Tigress Holds Her Head  [MG1, MG2]    
Hu Bao Tou  (Ch.) 
Le Tigress Tient Sa Tęte  (Fr.)
Das Tigress Hält Ihren Kopf  (Gr.) 
El Tigress Lleva a Cabo Su Cabeza  (Sp.)
虎抱頭 : Tiger Holds Its Head

 

14.  The Wild Horse Leaps Over the Creek  

Level Stab, Jumping  
Wild Horse Jumps Over the Creek 
Hop and Thrust 
Wild Horse Jumps the Mountain Stream 
Jump Step and Stab with Flat Sword 
Mustang Jumps the Ravine
Wild Horse Leaping Over Creek  [PL, JT] 
Jump and Flat Pierce Forward  [GLCZ]   
The Wild Horse Leaps Over the Creek  [MG1]
The Wild Horse Jumps Over the Creek MG2]  
Ye Ma Tiao Jian  (Ch.) 
Le Cheval Sauvage Saute par-dessus la Crique  (Fr.) 
Das Wilde Pferd Springt über den Nebenfluß  (Gr.)
El Caballo Salvaje Salta Sobre el Cala  (Sp.) 
野馬跳澗 : The Wild Horse Jumps the Stream   
野马跳涧 : Mustang Jumps the Ravine

 

15.  Cutting Upward in a Left Empty Stance  

Circle Sword Counterclockwise to Left, Cut Upward, Left Leg Empty Stance 
Hold Up with Left Empty Step
The Little Dipper Constellation
Wheel Chop to Left Empty Stance
The Little Evil Deity Standing on One Leg     
Empty Stance and Slice Upward 
Cutting Upward in Empty Stance  [PL] 
Little Dipper  [JT]   
Swing Sword with Left Empty Bow Stance  [GLCZ]
Cutting Upward in a Left Empty Stance  [MG1] 
The Little Star of the Big Dipper [MG2] 
Xiao Kui Xing  (Ch.) 
Le Peu Tiennent le Premier Rôle de la Constellation de Grand Huit  (Fr.) 
Der Kleine Stern der Wagen-Konstellation  (Gr.)    
La Pequeńa Estrella de la Constelación del Cucharón Grande  (Sp.)
小魁星 : Little Star of Dipper
夜叉探海 

 

16.  Scooping the Moon from the Bottom of the Sea    

Draw Sword Right and Down, Swing Sword from Below to Slice Upward, Step Into Right Bow Stance
Hold Up with Right Bow Step
Fishing the Moon Out from the Bottom of the Sea 
Swing Up Sword in Right Bow Stance
Scoop the Sea Bottom for the Moon
Pick Up the Moon from the Sea Bottom     
Right Bow Stance and Slice Upward 
Scooping the Moon from Sea Bottom  [PL] 
Scooping the Moon from the Sea Bottom  [JT] 
Swing Sword with Right Bow Stance  [GLCZ]
Scooping the Moon from the Bottom of the Sea  [MG1] 
Scoop Up the Moon from the Bottom of the Sea  [MG2]  
Hai Di Lao Yue  (Ch.) 
Godet vers le Haut de la Lune du Fond de la Mer  (Fr.)
Schaufel Herauf den Mond von der Unterseite des Meeres  (Gr.) 
Cucharada Encima de la Luna del Fondo del Mar  (Sp.)
海底撈月 : Pick Up the Moon from the Sea Bottom   

 

17.  The Rhinoceros Gazes at the Moon    

Rhinoceros Gazes at the Moon, Turn and Chop Down, Shoot the Wild Goose
Withdraw Sword Rotating Body 
Turn Around and Withdraw Sword  
Shooting at the Wild Geese 
Turn the Body and Pull Back 
Rhinoceros Gazing at the Moon  [PL,JT] 
Turn and Pull Sword Back  [GLCZ]   
The Rhinoceros Gazes at the Moon  [MG1, MG2]   
Xi Niu Wang Yue  (Ch.) 
Le Rhinocéros Regarde Fixement la Lune  (Fr.)
Der Rhinoceros Starrt den Mond  (Gr.) 
El Rhinoceros Mira en la Luna  (Sp.)
犀牛望月: The Rhinoceros Looks at the Moon  
預備式 : Shooting at Wild Geese  
射雁势 :  Shooting the Wild Goose, She Yan Shi

 

18.  The White Ape Offers the Fruit   

Turn, Bring Feet Together, Squat, Stand Up, Stab Upward with Two Hands
Level Stab and Gathering Feet
Thrust with Feet Together   
White Monkey Presents Fruit 
Stand Upright with Feet Together and Stab with Flat Sword
White Ape Offering Fruit   [PL,JT] 
Close Steps and Flat Pierce  [GLCZ]   
The White Ape Offers the Fruit  [MG1, MG2]  
Bai Yuan Xian Guo  (Ch.)  
La Singe Blanche Offre le Fruit  (Fr.)     
Der Weiße Affe Bietet die Frucht  (Gr.)
El Mono Blanco Ofrece la Fruta  (Sp.)
猿献果 : White Ape Presents the Fruit 
白色猴子提供果子

 

19.  Parrying in Left Bow Stance  

Cut to Right, Squat on Right Leg, Swing Slice Sword Right to Left, Left Bow Stance 
Dusting in the Wind, Left
Block with Left Bow Step  
Left Bow Stance and Block  
Parrying in Left Bow Stance  [PL] 
Whisking Dust from the Wind - Left  [JT]   
Obstruct Sword with Left Bow Stance  [GLCZ]     
Parrying in Left Bow Stance  [MG1] 
Shaking the Duster in the Wind  [MG2] 
Ying Feng Fu Chen, Zuo Ying Feng Dan Chen  (Ch.) 
Secousse du Chiffon dans le Vent
  (Fr.)
Rütteln des Staubtuchs im Wind  (Gr.) 
Sacudarir el Plumero en el Viento  (Sp.) 
震动喷粉器在风 
迎風撣塵 左 : Dusting in the Wind, Left    

迎风掸尘
左 : Dusting in the Wind, Left
迎風撣塵 左 : Dusting in the Wind, Left   

 

20.  Parrying in Right Bow Stance    

Swing Slice Sword Left to Right, Right Bow Stance
Block with Right Bow Step 
Dusting the Wind, Right
Right Bow Stance and Block
Parrying in Right Bow Stance  [PL] 
Whisking Dust from the Wind - Right  [JT]   
Obstruct Sword with Right Bow Stance  [GLCZ]   
Parrying in Right Bow Stance  [MG1] 
Shaking the Duster in the Wind  [MG2] 
Ying Feng Fu Chen  (Ch.) 
Secousse du Chiffon dans le Vent
  (Fr.)
Rütteln des Staubtuchs im Wind  (Gr.) 
Sacudarir el Plumero en el Viento  (Sp.) 
震动喷粉器在风 
迎風撣塵 右 : Dusting in the Wind, Right    

迎风掸尘
右 : Dusting in the Wind, Right
迎風撣塵 右  : Dusting in the Wind, Right 

 

21.  Parrying in Left Bow Stance   

Swing Slice Sword from Right to Left, Left Bow Stance
Block with Left Bow Step 
Dusting the Wind Left 
Left Bow Stance and Block
Parrying in Left Bow Stance  [PL]  
Whisking Dust from the Wind - Left  [JT]   
Obstruct Sword with Left Bow Stance  [GLCZ]   
Parrying in Left Bow Stance  [MG1] 
Shaking the Duster in the Wind  [MG2] 
Ying Feng Fu Chen  (Ch.) 
Secousse du Chiffon dans le Vent
  (Fr.)
Rütteln des Staubtuchs im Wind  (Gr.) 
Sacudarir el Plumero en el Viento  (Sp.) 
震动喷粉器在风 
迎風撣塵 左 : Dusting in the Wind, Left    

迎风掸尘
左 : Dusting in the Wind, Left

 

22.  Pushing the Boat with the Current    

Cross Step and Immortal Points the Way; Step Forward into Left Bow Stance, Stab Downward
Stepping Forward and Piercing Back
Step Forward and Plunge Backward
Twist, Advance, and Thrust Forward
Step In and Stab Backhand
Pushing the Boat Into the Current
Push Boat with the Current   
Stepping Forward and Pushing Back  [PL] 
Pushing the Boat with River Current  [JT] 
Step Forward and Opposite Pierce  [GLCZ]   
Pushing the Boat with the Current  [MG1] 
Push the Boat with the Current  [MG2] 
Shun Shui Tui Zhou  (Ch.) 
Poussez le Bateau avec le Courant  (Fr.) 
Drücken Sie das Boot mit dem Strom  (Gr.)   
Empuje el Barco con la Corriente  (Sp.) 
順水推舟: Push Boat with Current  

 

23.  The Comet Chases the Moon    

Turn Body, Chop Down, Right Bow Stance
Turn Body and Split Back 
Turn Around to Cut 
Reverse Body and Chop Behind 
Shooting Stars Chase the Moon  [Meteor Runs After Moon]  
The Flying Star Chasing the Moon  
Comet Chasing the Moon  [PL, JT] 
Reposition and Chop Back  [GLCZ]   
The Comet Chases the Moon  [MG1]
The Comet Flies by the Moon  [MG2]
Liu Xing Gan Yue  (Ch.: Chinese)   
La Comčte Vole par la Lune  (Fr.: French) 
Der Komet Fliegt durch den Mond  (Gr.: German) 
La Estrella que Tira Persigue la Luna  (Sp.: Spanish)
流星趕月 : Shooting Stars Chase the Moon 
彗星飞行由月亮 : Comet Flies by the Moon

 

24.  The Heavenly Horse Gallops Across the Sky    

Cut Down with Sword, Step to Left Empty Stance, Point Sword Downward 
Point Sword with Empty Step
Point Sword in Right Empty Stance  
Empty Stance and Point the Sword  
The Bird Flies Over the Waterfall
Heavenly Horse Galloping Across the Sky
Heavenly Steed Soars Across the Sky
Flying the Horse in the Sky  
Heavenly Horse Flying Across the Sky  [PL]
Pegasus Flying Across the Sky  [JT] 
Point Sword with Empty Stance  [GLCZ]   
Heavenly Horse Gallops Across the Sky  [MG1, MG2]  
Tian Ma Xing Kong  (Ch.) 
Le Cheval Merveilleux Galope ŕ Travers le Ciel  (Fr.)
Das Himmlische Pferd Galoppiert über den Himmel  (Gr.) 
Los Galopes Divinos del Caballo a Través del Cielo  (Sp.) 
飛馬行空 : Heavenly Horse Gallops Across the Sky  
天马飞瀑 : Heavenly Steed Flies Over the Waterfall
鸟飞行在瀑布 : The Bird Flies Over the Waterfall 

 

25.  Lifting the Door Curtain  

Step of Cross Step Stance, Circle Sword Down and Up Clockwise, Stand on Right Leg and Lift Sword
Independent Level Support 
Stand on One Leg and Hold Sword Level 
Hook Up the Curtain 
One-Leg Stance and Lift Horizontally  
Standing on One Leg and Lifting Sword  [PL] 
Lifting Up Curtain with Sword  [JT] 
Hold Sword with One-Leg Up  [GLCZ]   
Lifting the Door Curtain  [MG1]   
Roll Up the Screen  [MG2] 
Tiao Lian Shi  (Ch.) 
Enroulez l'écran  (Fr.)
Rollen Sie Oben den Vorhang  (Gr.)
Ruede Para Arriba la Pantalla  (Sp.) 
挑簾式 :  Hold Up the Curtain   
挑帘势 : Lifting up the Curtain

 

26.  Left Wheeling Chop Into a Right Bow Stance    

Circle Sword Down and Up on Right, Chop Down in Right Leg Bow Stance  
Split with Bow Step
Bow Stance, Hook and Chop 
Cutting in a Bow Stance  [PL]
Cutting Sword in Bow Stance  [JT] 
Hang-Up Chop with Right Bow Stance [GLCZ]   
Left Wheeling Chop Into a Right Bow Stance  [MG1] 
Cart-Wheel Sword to the Left and Right  [MG2]  
Zuo You Che Lun Jian  (Ch.) 
Épée de Rue au Gauche et Droit  (Fr.)
Linke und Rechte Wagenrad-Klinge  (Gr.) 
Los Círculos de la Espada Tienen Gusto de un Rueda de un Carro  (Sp.)
左輪劍  :  Left Wheeling Sword 
左车轮 : Left Cart Wheel

 

27.  Right Wheeling Chop Into a Right Empty Stance    

Draw Sword Back to Right, Step Left, Circle Sword Up and Slice Down, Step into Right Leg Empty Stance
Split with Empty Stance   
Empty Stance, Circle Sword and Chop
Cutting Downward in Empty Stance  [PL] 
Cutting Sword in Empty Stance  [JT] 
Wheel Chop with Empty Stance  [GLCZ]      
Right Wheeling Chop Into a Right Empty Stance  [MG1]     
Cart-Wheel Sword to the Left and Right  [MG2]    
Zuo You Che Lun Jian  (Ch.) 
Épée de Rue au Gauche et Droit  (Fr.)
Linke und Rechte Wagenrad-Klinge  (Gr.) 
Los Círculos de la Espada Tienen Gusto de un Rueda de un Carro  (Sp.)
右车轮 : Right Cart Wheel 
右輪劍 : Right Wheeling Sword 
燕子啣泥  

 

28.  The Phoenix Spreads Its Wings    

Step Back, Cross Hands, Slice Cockwise Backward, Open Both Arms 
Retreat Step and Attack Backward to Right Side
Counter Attack, Feet Withdrawn  
Step Back to Strike 
Back Step, Circle Sword and Chop 
Phoenix Spreads Its Wings
Great Roc Spreads Its Wings 
The Condor Spreading Its Wings 
Giant Geese Spreading Wings  [PL] 
Giant Hawk Spreading Wings  [JT]
Retreat Step and Attack Backward  [GLCZ]   
The Phoenix Spreads Its Wings  [MG1, MG2] 
Feng Huang Shuang Zhan Chi  (Ch.)
Phoenix Répand Ses Ailes  (Fr.)
Das Phoenix Verbreitet Seine Flügel  (Gr.)
La Phoenix Separa Sus Alas  (Sp.)
大鵬展翅 :  Phoenix Spreads Its Wings   
凤凰双展翅 : Phoenix Opens Both its Wings  

 

29.  The Bee Enters the Hive 

Left Empty Stance, Step to Right Bow Stance, Stab Forward
Stepping Forward and Making a Level Stab in Right Bow Stance 
Step Forward to Thrust 
Step in and Stab with Flat Sword
Wasp Enters Its Nest 
Yellow Bee Returns to Nest  
The Hornet Flying Into the Hive 
Stepping Forward to Thrust  [PL] 
Yellow Jacket Returning to Hive  [JT] 
Step Forward and Flat Pierce  [GLCZ]   
The Bee Enters the Hive  [MG1, MG2]
Huang Feng Ru Dong  (Ch.) 
L'abeille Entre dans la Ruche  (Fr.)
Die Biene Kommt den Bienenstock  (Gr.)
La Abeja Entra en la Colmena  (Sp.)
黃蜂入洞 : Wasp Enters Its Nest        

 

30.  Holding the Moon 

Drawing Sword to Left Hip, Turn Body to Side, Left Leg Empty Stance
Withdrawing the Sword in an Empty Stance    
Draw Back with T Step
Sword Withdraws and Feet Retire
Step Back and Pull Sword 
Withdraw Sword in T-Step
T-Stance and Pull Back 
Step Back and Withdraw Sword 
Embrace the Moon
Holding the Moon with the Arms 
Withdrawing Sword  [PL]
Embracing the Moon  [JT] 
Pull Back Sword with T-Stance  [GLCZ]   
Holding the Moon  [MG1]  
Holding the Moon in the Arms  [MG2]   
Huai Zhong Bao Yue  (Ch.)
Tenir la Lune dans les Bras  (Fr.)
Umklammern des Mondes zum Busen  (Gr.)
Sostener la Luna en Los Brazos  (Sp.)
懷中抱月 : Clasp the Moon to the Bosom

 

31.  The Wind Sweeps the Plum Blossoms     

Circle Clockwise, Spin Sword Horizontally and Smear
Turn and Erase
Circle Sword Horizontally
Turn Around and Smear Horizontally 
Wind Sweeps the Plum Blossoms 
The Wind Sweeping the Plum Flower Petals
Wind Sweeping Plum Blossoms  [PL, JT] 
Rotate and Flat Slice  [GLCZ]    
The Wind Sweeps the Plum Blossoms  [MG1, MG2]
Feng Sao Mei Hua  (Ch.) 
Le Vent Balaye les Fleurs de Prune  (Fr.) 
Der Wind Fegt die Pflaume-Blüten  (Gr.) 
El Viento Barre las Flores del Ciruelo  (Sp.)
風掃梅花 : Wind Blows Away the Plum Flowers     
凤扫梅花 : Plum Flowers Being Swept by the Wind
風清掃李子開花 
   

 

32.  The Compass Needle      

Step Forward to Right Bow Stance, Stab/Thrust Forward, Palms Up
Stab Straight with Bow Step
Thrust Forward in Bow Stance
Bow Stance and Stab Straight
Thrusting Forward in Bow Stance  [PL] 
Compass Needle Pointing South  [JT]  
Forward Pierce with Left Bow Stance  [GLCZ]   
The Compass Needle  [MG1, MG2] 
Zhi Nan Zhen  (Ch.) 
L'Aiguille De Boussole  (Fr.)
Die Kompass-Nadel  (Gr.)
La Aguja Del Compás  (Sp.)
指南针 : The Compass

黃龍獻爪  

 

Ending Posture, Conclusion 收勢, Closing Movement, Return to On Guard Posture, Closing Position,
Transfer Sword and Return to Wuji
Step forward with right foot, transfer sword to the left hand, bring sword over to the left side,
push down with the right hand, settle into a high squat, slowly stand up, and take Wuji stance.   

 

Reference Sources for 32 Sword Form Movement/Posture Names:

[PL]   Paul Lam, "Tai Chi: The 32 Sword Forms." Instructional DVD and VHS, 1996.
[JT]    Jesse Tsao, "Simplified Tai Chi Sword Form 32."  Instructional DVD.  
[GLCZ]   Guangqi, Li and Chen, Zhao.  "Tai Chi Sword: The 32 Simplified Forms."  Book, 2006, p.15-16. 
[MG1]   Mike Garofalo, "32 Sword Form: List of Movements,"  2008, 1 page, PDF Print.
[MG2]   Mike Garofalo, List of Movements, Yang Tai Chi Straight Sword, 55 Movements, 2008, 34 pages, PDF Print.

"The Orthodox Chinese Tai Ji Sword" by Madame Master Wang Ji Yung. 
"Tai Chi Sword: The 32 Simplified Forms."   By Guangqi, Li and Chen, Zhao PhD, 2006, p.135-137.  
[Other Names for the Movements from books by Kobayashi, Rodell, Yun, Yang, and webpages, etc., cited above.]       
The Chinese characters for the movement names can be found in various books and webpages cited above
 

List of Movements, Complete 1-32, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List

List of Movements, First Half, Movements 1 -16, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List  

List of Movements, Second Half, Movements 17-32, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List

Classical Tai Chi Sword, List of Movements, Yang Style, 55 Movements, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, 34 pages  

 

 

Part One:  Movements/Postures 1 - 8

Part Two:  Movements/Postures 9 -16 

Part Three: Movements/Postures 17-24

Part Four: Movements/Postures 25-32

 

 

 

Complete Performance of the Standard 32 Tai Chi Sword Form
      

Time Performer Source
              
4:31 Lam, Paul Tai Chi: The 32 Sword Forms, 1996
  Xing, Guangzhi Simplified Tai Chi Sword 32 Form, 2005
2:22 Wang, Ji Yung Orthodox Chinese Tai Chi Sword
  Jiang Jian-ye 32 Step Tai Chi Sword,
3:06 Tsao, Jesse Simplified Tai Chi Sword Form 32
3:02 Unknown - UTube

32 Sword Form.  UTube, Video Demonstration

3:45 Xue An Ri

32 Sword Form.   UTube Video Demonstration. 

3:00 Chen Sitan 32 Sword Form.   UTube Video Demonstration. 
2:56 Sabistiani, Simone 32 Sword Form.   UTube Video Demonstration. 
2:23 Unknown: Carter-Video 32 Sword Form.   UTube Video Demonstration.
  Average Performance Time  


 

 

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Analysis and Descriptions
32 Standardized (Orthodox) Simplified Sword Form Movement Sequence

© Michael P. Garofalo, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008. 

 


0.  Preparation and Opening

Stand with feet together or less than shoulder width.  Face to the North (N12).  Hold the sword in the left hand, with the sword along the back side of the left arm, sword tip facing up.  Rest the hands at the side of the hips.  Take up the Wuji meditation posture: stand up straight, relax body and mind (sung), sink energy to dan tien, tuck the bottom of the pelvis slightly forward, hold the chin slightly tucked, keep the crown of head held high, keep the lips slightly parted, rest the tongue on the roof of the mouth behind the front teeth, keep your weight centered over hips and legs in central equilibrium (zhong ding), etc.  This is a preparation posture for beginning to root the feet and legs into the power of the earth, ground the energetic forces (Qi) of the body, center and concentrate the mind (Yi) on the task at hand, and raise the spirit (Shen) by Returning to the One.    

Execute a ceremonial bow as is appropriate to your Taijiquan school's tradition and practice.  Many raise hands to chest height, touch hands or cross the hands, bow the head, then return the hands to the side of the hips.  Many Yang style players do a "Raise Hands and Lower Hands" movement.  They raise both hands, palms down, on an inhale, to about chest height, and then lower both hands back to sides of the hips on the exhale. 

Stand quietly in Wuji meditation for awhile to gain mental, physical and spiritual composure.  Quiet the mind.  Become fully present in both time and place.  Focus on being here and now.  Wuji stands for "no limit, emptiness, nothingness, without definition, before all movement, spontaneity, freedom and chaos"; whereas, Taiji stands for "at the limit, after movement, multiplicity, space-time emergence, extreme limits, yin and yang evolution, regularity, law and cosmos." 

"In Daoist ritual the first act is also called, “calling the qi to order.” To call the qi to order one must first invoke the Perfected Warrior, Zhen Wu. This is done by standing still using the physicality of the method described above. It is a totally ready stance–able to instantaneously issue force in all directions.  But Zhen Wu is not just a physicality, he is a whole way of seeing the world, and he is the first stage in the practice of jindan (golden elixir).  Zhen Wu is visualized in his armor with skin like the night sky drawing inward, chain and silk is woven into his hair.  He has bare feet and he is energetically on the edge of his seat.  Think of him as holding a sword in one hand, without a sheath, the tip of the blade is dragging on the ground.  He is the embodiment of the taijiquan concept song (or sung, let go, sink) he is utterly fearless, the god of nothing-to-lose."
Weakness With a Twist - Daoist Ritual Standing

Step to the left (W9) with the left leg.  You are now in position 1a as shown below.  Settle into a stable centered stance, knees slightly bent, legs about shoulder width apart.  You should be facing to the North (N12).  Hold the sword in the left hand, tip of the blade point up to the sky, sword behind the left arm.  Rest the hands at the side of the hips.  The index finger and middle finger are on the side facing forward along with the back of the hand, both fingers extended downward; the thumb, ring finger and little finger all curl around and hold the sword on the hilt. 

List of Movements, Complete 1-32, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List (PDF format)

 

 

Part One:  Movements/Postures 1 - 8

 

1.  Three Rings Around the Moon   (1a-1g)

 

 

This movement, #1, has various names: Three Rings Around the Moon, Circling the Moon Three Times, Place Feet Together and Point Sword, Point Sword with Closing Steps, Dragonfly Dips Water, Three Halos Around the Moon, Three Rings Envelop the Moon. 

Begin by facing to the N12 direction.  The sword is in the left hand, with the sword  facing upward (1a).  The left hand is down along the left hip, with the sword being held in the reversed holding position (fanwo).  The right hand is held in the sword hand position (index and middle finger pointed, thumb curled and touching the ring finger).  The position of the empty hand is also called the "finger sword" (jianjue, qijian).  Raise both hands to shoulder height (1a).  Turn upper torso to the right side to face NE2, raise left hand and sword to eye level (1c), lower right hand to waist. Step with left foot back to face W9, and place left leg in a left bow stance (i.e., 70% of weight in left leg, 30% in right leg).  Turn torso to face W9.  Extend right arm forward towards W9.  Bring left hand and sword to left hip, sword facing upward (1d).  Position 1d is sometimes called: The Immortal Points the Way, The Fairy Shows the Way (仙人指路,  Xian Ren Shi Lu).  Moving from 1c to 1d corresponds to the Yang Taijiquan hand form movement called 'Brush Knee.'

 

 

[A note on the illustrations.]

Step forward with right leg, right foot facing N12.  Bend both knees and squat down a little in a twist step stance, with left knee tucked behind right knee (1e).  Open right arm and extend arm to point with sword hand to E3 (1e).  Extend left hand to point to W9, sword behind left arm.  Look back to E3 (1e). 

Step forward with left leg into a left bow stance, turning the torso to facing W9 (1f).  Draw sword back and up in clockwise circular manner (1f0 to end with sword facing W9 (1g).  Torso is acing W9 (1f).  Transfer sword from left hand to the right hand (1f).  Bring right foot up to left foot and bend knees, torso facing W9 (1g).  Extend arms to W9 at chest height (1g).  Lower the tip of the sword towards floor (1g).  1g is called "Point Sword with Feet Together." 

All of steps 1a - 1g are done in a flowing, graceful, and slow manner.  When a part of the body is moving, all other parts of the body are moving in a smooth coordinated manner.  For example, at the "finish" of 1e all parts of the body arrive in their positions at the same time.  Emphasize coordinated and timed flowing, and avoiding any jerkiness. 

At the end of each movement or posture, the sword blade is held in a specific position.  The blade of the sword can be held with the "sharp" edge of the sword held in a vertical or perpendicular position, one edge pointing directly down to the floor the other to the sky, the zhimian position.  The blade of the sword can be held with the "sharp" edge of the sword held in a horizontal or parallel position relative to the floor, the sword blade flat relative to the ground, the pingmian position.  Finally, the blade of the sword can be held with the "sharp" edge of the sword held at an angle relative to the floor, tilted to the side, slanted, or angled to the right or left side.  In position 1g, the sword blade edge is held in a vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian

In general, during the practice of Taiji sword, the posture is held upright, we stand tall, we keep our back straight, we relax the shoulders and chest, we center the weight in the waist, we draw our chin in slightly, and we keep the crown of the head held high.  We strive for nimbleness, alertness, poise, precision, and dignity. 

Keep in mind that although the one sentence at a time descriptions that follow might imply a kind of step-by-step or one-two-three mechanical and jerky sort of movement sequence, in actual practice the movements "flow" smoothly together.  Sometimes, multiple movements of the arms and legs occur simultaneously.  When practicing alone at home, be sure to carefully study the DVDs, VHS, or UTube video demonstrations or instructions (listed above) on how to perform, to move, to play, to dance, to properly perform this 32 sword form.  Sword forms are fluid, graceful, controlled, and expressive.

I have chosen to describe the movements using the clock diagram shown on this page, starting the 32 sword from a position of facing N12.  Once you know how to do the 32 sword form, you can begin your sword practice facing in any direction that is convenient depending upon time and place.  For example, when I practice the 32 sword form outdoors in the early morning, I begin by facing NW10:30 and move along a SW8 and NE2 line, so I don't face the low morning sun as much.   

 

 

2.  The Big Dipper   (2a-2d)

 

 

This movement, #2, has various names: Big Dipper, Standing on One Leg and Thrusting the Sword, Standing on One Leg to Thrust, Thrust Back Independently, Opposite Pierce with One-Leg Stand, Big Dipper Constellation, Big Chief Star. 

Begin by stepping back (2a) with the right leg with foot at N12 (2b).  Draw sword in arc down to point to NE1.  Raise sword to point directly upward.  Turn torso to look to NE1 (2c).  Draw left leg back to toe stance.  Transfer weight into the right leg.  Look to NE1 (2c).  Draw left leg in the air, knee facing W9, balancing on right leg.  Lift sword over head, and point sword tip to W9, sword parallel to floor (2d).  Extend left arm to W9, fingers in the sword hand position.  Look towards W9 (2d).  Position 2d reminds us of the Yang Taijiquan hand form position called 'Golden Rooster Stands on Right Leg.'  In position 2d, the sword blade edge is held in the vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian

"Chen Weiming calls the empty hand (predominately the left hand) literally "the hand pinched into a secret sword (shou nei jian jue), which is know elsewhere as "finger sword."  I have rendered it "feigned sword."  The empty hand keeps the feigned sword position throughout the form, with only a few exceptions that will be noted, such as when supporting the back of the hand holding the sword.  In general, the empty hand follows the sword hand.  This task serves to counter-balance the sword, to back it up energetically, to support the sword hand physically, and quite practically, to keep the empty hand out of the path of the sword."
-  Barbara Davis, Taiji Sword and Other Writings, p. xv.

Symbolism and Lore about the Big Dipper Posture

 

 

3.  The Swallow Skims Across the Water   (3a-3c)

 

 

This movement, #3, has various names: Swallow Skims Across the Water, Swallow Skimming Across the Water, Sweep the Sword with Falling Step, Crouch Down and Sweep Sword, Swallow Skims Over the Pond. 

Begin by drawing the left foot down to floor, and step back with left leg to SW7 (3a).  Swing sword in arc down and point sword to NE2 (3a).  Right leg in bow stance (3b).  Touch left hand to right wrist (3b).  Turn the torso to face W9 (3c).  Pivot on left heel till left foot pointing SW7.  Left leg in bow stance (3c).  Swing sword from NE1 down and up in arc to point to W9.  Sword pointed slightly up at chest height towards W9.  Left hand raised above head, left arm out from body, with left palm facing to S6 (3c).  Right palm holding sword is up.  In position 3c, the sword blade edge is held at an angle relative to the floor.   

 

On the above book cover, Petra Kobayashi demonstrates The Big Dipper (3a) and The Swallow Skims Across the Water (3b).  He draws the right knee very low for 3b, and then draws the sword very low along the ground and then upward.  The rising movement (2c,2d) and then the deep lowering movement (3a,3b) provides those with more strength, flexibility, and martial arts athletic skills the opportunity to show a more dramatic demonstration of the transition between the movements 2 and 3. 

When in group or private classes with a Taijiquan teacher, please very carefully follow your teacher in class and repeat, mimic, and replicate the movements as he or she demonstrates them to you.   In most cases, the specific movement sequencing and positioning will be pretty close to what is described herein; nevertheless, when differences occur, follow your instructor's demonstrations and all the details that they teach.  Teachers have different styles of teaching: some say very little, some always do the form all the way through every time, some modify the forms somewhat to suit their temperament and physical skills, some will break the form into each movement and have you drill each movement over and over before proceeding, some encourage outside study using media and print resources, some provide more information on the martial arts applications, etc.  The student just needs to adapt, be flexible, be open-minded, show respect to the teachers, and always remember the distinction between the purpose/benefits/spirit of the activities and the details of the activities.      

 

 

 

4.  Block and Sweep to the Right   (4a-4b)

 

 

This movement, #4, has various names: Block and Sweep to the Right, Drawing the Sword to the Right, Carrying the Sword to the Right, Level Bringing to the Right, Right Slice with Bow Stance, Sweep to the Right. 

Begin by pushing the sword forward a little towards W9 (4a).  Turn right palm down and rotate the sword in a tight counterclockwise circle.  Step forward with right leg into right bow stance (4b).  Left fingers touch right hand holding sword (4b).  Front of body faces W9.  Position 4a reminds us of the Yang Taijiquan hand form position called 'Fair Lady Works the Shuttles.'  In position 4b, the sword blade edge is held at an angle relative to the floor.   

 

 

5.  Block and Sweep to the Left   (5a-5b)

 

 

This movement, #5, has various names: Block and Sweep to the Left, Drawing the Sword to the Left, Carrying the Sword to the Left, Level Bringing to the Left, Left Slice with Bow Stance, Sweep to the Left.  

Begin by pushing the sword forward a little towards W9 (5a).  Turn right palm up and rotate the sword in a tight clockwise circle.  Step forward with left leg into left bow stance (5b).  Left foot and knee aim towards SW8.  Sword is pointed slightly up at chest height towards W9.  Left hand raised above head, left arm out from body, with left palm facing to S6 (5b).  Right palm holding sword is up.  Front of body faces W9.    In position 5b, the sword blade edge is held at an angle relative to the floor.   

 

 

6.  Searching the Sea   (6a-6d)

 

 

This movement, #6, has various names: Little Dipper, Small Star of the Big Dipper, Sounding the Sea, Split Independently, Wheel Chop Sword with One-leg Stand, Small Star of the Literary God.      

Begin by stepping forward with the right leg (6a) and placing the right foot by the left foot (6b).  Lower the left hand (6a) down to touch the right wrist (6b).  Rotate at the waist and turn to look to SE5 (6c) as you draw the sword down in an arc towards SE5 (6b) and then up and moving in an arc (6c) to finally point the sword down to NW10 (6d).  Step forward to NW10 with the right leg.  Turn the torso to face W9.  Raise the left leg up with knee high and the left foot turned inward (6d).  Balance on the right leg.  Left hand is raised above head, left arm out from body, with left palm facing to SW7 (6d).  Point the sword downward, with the blade in a vertical position.  Look at the tip of the sword.    In position 6d, the sword blade edge is held in a vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian

 

 

7.  Holding the Moon   (7a-7b)

 

 

This movement, #7, has various names: Step Back and Pull the Sword, Holding the Moon, Withdrawing Sword in Empty Stance, Sword Withdraws and Feet Retire, Embrace the Moon. 

Begin by lowering the left leg and stepping back (7a) with left foot.  Draw the left hand down (7a) towards left hip.  Bring the right hand back towards the body (7a) and move the end knob and handle down to the left hip.  The left fingers touch the right hand.  The sword points up at an angle (7b).  The body faces to W9.  Touch the right toe on the floor, drawing the body weight back into the left leg in a toe stance (7b).  Look forward to W9.    In position 7b, the sword blade edge is held in a vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian.

This posture (7b) is repeated in 30b below.  

 

 

8.  The Bird Returns to the Tree at Dusk   (8a-8b)

 

 

This movement, #8, has various names: Birds Returning to the Trees at Dusk, Split Upward Independently, Upward Pierce Sword with One-Leg Stand, Sleepy Birds Returning to the Forest, Birds Lodging in the Forest. 

Begin by stepping forward slightly with the left foot (8a).  Shift weight into the right leg, drawing left leg off the ground with the knee high (8b).  The left foot is turned inward.  Extended both arms with sword pointed upward in W9 direction (8b).  Both hands hold the sword, with the palms facing upward.    In position 8b, the sword blade edge is held in a horizontal position relative to the floor, pengmian.  Look forward towards W9 towards the tip of the sword. 


 

 

 

Part Two:  Movements/Postures 9 -16 

 

 

9.  The Black Dragon Whips His Tail   (9a-9b)

 

[A note on the illustrations.]

This movement, #9, has various names: Black Dragon Whips His Tail, Dragon Sweeping Tail, Sever Downward with Empty Step, Empty Stance and Slice Downward, Dragon Whips Its Tail, Black Dragon Swings Its Tail. 

Begin by lowering the left leg (9a) and moving it back so that the foot faced towards SW7 (9b).  As the leg is draw back move the sword in a counterclockwise arc downward (slicing downward) so that the sword ends up pointing towards NW 11, and the sword hand's palm is facing down (9b).  The sword hilt is at about hip height.  The left hand is moved from the forward position (9a) in a clockwise arc and ends being raised above head, left arm out from body, with left palm facing to SW8.  The body is turned at the waist toward NW10 (9b).     In position 9b, the sword blade edge is held in a angled or slanted position relative to the floor. The eyes look to NW10.  Position 9b reminds us of the Yang Taijiquan hand form position called 'White Stork Cools Its Wings.' 

 

 

10.  The Green Dragon Emerges from the Water   (10a-10c)

 

 

This movement, #10, has various names: Green Dragon Emerging from Water, Split with Left Bow Step, Pierce with Left Bow Stance, Green Dragon Comes out of the Water. 

Begin by drawing the right leg back (10a) and place the foot facing N11; as the sword is lifted up and thrusted forward.  Turn the torso to face N12 (10b).  The right hand draws the sword to about face height, with palm facing down, with the sword flat relative to the earth.  The left sword finger touches the right wrist.  Draw the left foot near the right foot into a left empty stance (10b).  Look to W9.  Step to the left into a left bow stance (10c).  The sword is draw in a clockwise arc (10b) and ends pointing to W9.  The left hand is moved in a clockwise arc and ends being raised above the head, left arm out from body, with left palm facing to SW8 (10c).  In position 10c, the sword blade edge is held, palm up,  in a horizontal position relative to the floor, pengmian

 

 

11.  Turning Around and Carrying the Sword   (11a-11c)

 

 

This movement, #11, has various names: Turning Round and Carrying Sword, Bring Diagonally and Turn Body, Pull-back Turn and Skew Slice Sword, Wind Curls Up Lotus Leaves, Wind Blows the Lotus Leaf.   

Begin by drawing the weight to the right, while remaining upright.  Pivot on the left heel, drawing the toes clockwise (11a).  Draw the left sword finger hand to touch the right wrist at about chest height (11b).  Draw the left leg next to the right leg (11b).  Turn from the waist to the right in a clockwise arc.  Step with the left leg towards SE4 into a left bow stance (11c).  In position 11c, the sword blade edge is held in a horizontal position relative to the floor, pengmian.  We are turning 195ş from 11a to 11c.  End in 11c by facing to the SE4.  Look at the tip of the sword.  

 

 

12.  The Lion Shakes His Mane   (12a-12b)

 

 

This movement, #12, has various names: Stepping Backward Carrying Sword; Bring Diagonally, Shrinking; Contract Body and Skew Slice Sword, Lion Shakes Its Head, The Lion Shakes His Mane.   

I have seen conflicting demonstrations and descriptions of this movement amongst different teachers.  Here are two of the options I have seen demonstrated:

1.  Begin (12a) by drawing the left foot up next to the right foot, gently touching the toe to the ground.  Then move the left foot back (12a).  Draw the sword back towards the left side of the body in a counterclockwise arc (12a).  Draw the right foot back into a right empty stance (12b).  Draw the sword to the center.  The torso and sword face towards E3.  In position 12b, the sword blade edge is held, palm up, in a horizontal position relative to the floor, pengmian.  The left sword finger touches the right wrist. 

2.  Begin (12a) by drawing the left foot up next to the right foot, gently touching the toe to the ground.  Then move the left foot back.  Step backward with the right foot to near the left foot (12b).  Open the arms to the side (arms as in 13a, but feet reversed).  The sword finger and sword both point towards the center, forming an inverted "V" shape.  Step forward slightly with the right foot into a right empty stance (12b).  Draw the sword to the center.  The torso and sword face towards E3.  The left sword finger touches the right wrist.  In position 12b, the sword blade edge is held, palm up, in a horizontal position relative to the floor, pengmian.   

 

 

13.  The Tigress Holds Her Head   (13a-13c)

 

 

This movement, #13, has various names: Tiger Holding Head, Sword Taken Up and Knee Lifted, Raise Knee and Hold Sword, Tiger Holds Its Head. 

Begin (13a) by drawing the right foot back.  Settle the weight back into the right leg.  Step back just a little with the left toe.  Open the arms (13b).  The left sword finger and tip of the sword point to a center point in front of the body.  The body faces E3.  The right sword and sword finger kind of make a reverse V shape.  Step forward slightly with the left heel (13b), and draw all the bodyweight into the left foot (13c).  Move the right knee up off the ground, knee level with the right hip, right toe down and foot turned inward slightly (13c).  Draw the right and left hands together in front of the chest.  Place the left hand under the right hand and grasp the right hand.  In position 13c, the sword blade edge is held in a horizontal position relative to the floor, pengmian.  The body is facing E3.  Look at the tip of the sword (13c). 

© Michael P. Garofalo, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008. 

 

14.  The Wild Horse Leaps Over the Creek   (14a-14d)

 

 

This movement, #14, has various names: Wild Horse Leaping Over Creek; Level Stab, Jumping; Jump and Flat Pierce Forward; Wild Horse Jumps the Stream; Mustang Jumps the Ravine.   

Begin (14a) by stepping the right foot forward towards E3.  Draw the full weight into the right leg in a deep bow stance.  Extend both arms forward, thrusting the sword towards E3 (14b).  Lean forward into right leg until you are about to loose balance and fall forward.  Leap off the right leg and jump forward with the left foot (14b).  Settle all the weight into the left foot, stand up straight, and raise the right toe slightly off the ground (14c).  The hands separate from (14b) and are drawn down to the side of the hips (14c).  Step forward from (14c) with the right leg into a right bow stance (14d).  Extend the right arm forward and thrust the sword tip in the direction of E3 (14d).  The right palm is held upward.  In position 14d, the sword blade edge is held in a horizontal position relative to the floor, pengmian.  The left hand is moved from the left hip (14c) upwards in a clockwise arc and ends being raised above head, left arm out from body, with left palm facing to N12.  Look towards E3 at the tip of the sword.     

 

 

15.  Cutting Upward in a Left Empty Stance   (15a-15c)

 

 

This movement, #15, has various names: Cutting Upward in Empty Stance, Hold Up with Left Empty Step, Swing Sword with Left Empty Bow Stance, Little Dipper, the Little Dipper Constellation.  

Begin (15a) by stepping back with the right leg into a right toe stance (15b).  Draw the sword in the right hand in a clockwise arc from the right side to the left side of the body, sword point up, drawing the left hand downward in a clockwise arc to about hip height, and hold the sword at about hip height.  Bring the left sword fingers to the right wrist (15b).  Turn the upper torso to face NW11 (15b), as you step forward with the right leg.   Draw the sword downward in a wide counter-clockwise arc.  Pivot on the right toe.  Step forward with the left leg into a left empty stance (15c).  Turn the body to have the torso face towards SE5, with the head and sword facing E3.  Draw the sword up to about eye level.  In position 15c, the sword blade edge is held in a vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian.  The sword points to E3 and the eyes look at the tip of the sword (15c).   

 

 

16.  Scooping the Moon from the Bottom of the Sea   (16a-16c)

 

 

This movement, #16, has various names: Scooping the Moon from the Sea Bottom; Hold Up with Right Bow Step; Swing Sword with Right Bow Stance; Scoop the Sea Bottom for the Moon; Fishing for the Moon at the Sea Bottom.   

Beginning in position (16a), step forward slightly with the left foot.  Draw the sword in a clockwise arc above the head from front to back, turning the torso to face back towards SW8 (16b).  The sword is draw down to waist height, keeping the left sword finger on the right wrist (16b).  Step forward with the right leg into a right bow stance, facing E3, as you draw the sword down and forward in a wide clockwise arc (16b).  The sword is drawn upward with the wrist turning so that at the end (16c) the wrist is turned up.  As you step forward into position 16c, the sword blade edge is held in a vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian.  The left hand is draw in counterclockwise arc from the far right side (16c) to the left side, and ends being raised above the head, left arm out from body, with left palm facing to N12.  Look towards E3 at the tip of the sword.     

 

 

 

Part Three:  Movements/Postures 17 - 24 

 

 

17.  The Rhinoceros Gazes at the Moon   (17a-17d)

 

 

This movement, #17, has various names: Rhinoceros Gazing at the Moon, Withdraw Sword Rotating Body, Turn and Pull Sword Back, Shooting the Wild Goose. 

Begin (17a) by pivoting on the left heel, and drawing the body weight into the right leg, sinking the right knee, and rotating at the waist so that the chest faces N12 (17b).  Draw the sword from the right side to the left side, moving to the center of the body, holding the sword about face level, right sword finger touching left hand, with the sword pointed to R3 (17b).   In position 17b, the sword blade edge is held in a vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian.  Position 17b is called "Rhinoceros Gazes at the Moon." 

Draw the sword in a counter-clockwise arc over the body, from left to right, slicing downward with the sword.  Lift the body upwards, move the weight into the right leg, and move the left leg back into an empty left stance (17d).  As the sword is drawn back to the right hip, sword tip facing more upward (17d), move the left hand out, at chest height, sword finger pointing upward.  In position 17d, the sword blade edge is held in a vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian.  Position 17d is called "Shooting the Wild Goose."    Drawing one arm back and the other forward at shoulder height reminds one of the Yang hand form movement called "Repulse Monkey." 

 


Rhinoceros Gazing at the Moon
     

 

 

18.  The White Ape Offers the Fruit   (18a-18b)

 

 

This movement, #18, has various names: White Ape Offering Fruit, Level Stab and Gathering Feet, Close Steps and Flat Pierce, White Monkey Presents Fruit. 

Begin (18a) by stepping the left leg to the left, slightly back, and forward, keeping the knee bent slightly.  Rotate the torso to the left until the chest faces W9 (18b).  Bring the right foot up next to the left foot, again keeping the knees bent.  Move the sword up to the center of the body, and place the left hand under the right hand.  Slowly rise up to full height from the bent knee position.  As you rise up, extend the arms outward at chest height, and thrust the sword forward.  In position 18b, the sword blade edge is held in a horizontal position relative to the floor, pengmian.  Gaze over the sword tip pointing to W9.   

 

 

19.  Parrying in a Left Bow Stance   (19a-19c)

 

 

This movement, #19, has various names: Parrying in Left Bow Stance, Block with Left Bow Step, Obstruct Sword with Left Bow Stance, Dusting in the Wind. 

Begin (19a) by pivoting slightly to the left on the right heel.  Turn the torso to face N1 as you move the left hand to the right side to touch the sword finger on the right hand.  The sword is drawn in a clockwise arc towards N2, with both hands touching, then down and up toward the left side (19b).  Step out with the left leg into a left bow stance with knee and torso facing towards SW8 (19c).  The sword is drawn upwards, slicing upwards, palm up, and the sword blade edge is held in a angled position relative to the floor (19c).  The right hand is draw in clockwise arc from the far right side (19b) to the far left side (19c), and ends being raised above the head, left arm out from body, with left palm facing to S6.  Look towards the tip of the sword.   The sword is held high, above the head, with arms away from the body.  This position (19c) reminds us of the Yang hand form movement of "Fair Lady Works the Shuttles."     

 

 

20.  Parrying in a Right Bow Stance   (20a-20b)

 

 

This movement, #20, has various names: Parrying in Right Bow Stance, Block with Right Bow Step, Obstruct Sword with Right Bow Stance, Dusting in the Wind. 

Begin (20a) by stepping forward with the right leg into a right bow stance, with leg and torso facing NW11 (20b).  As the right leg moves forward, the arms carry the sword in a wide counterclockwise arc upwards from right to left and then downwards from left to right (20a).  The left arm also follows a counterclockwise arc and comes to rest on the right wrist at the end of the movement (20b).  The sword blade edge is held in a angled position relative to the floor (20b).  Look towards NW11.  The sword is held high, above the head, with arms away from the body (20b). 

 

 

21.  Parrying in a Left Bow Stance   (21a-21b)

 

 

This movement, #21, has various names: Parrying in Left Bow Stance, Block with Left Bow Step, Obstruct Sword with Left Bow Stance, Dusting in the Wind. 

Begin (21a) by pivoting slightly to the left on the right heel.  Turn the torso to face N1 as you move the left hand to the right side to touch the sword finger on the right hand.  The sword is drawn in a clockwise arc towards N1, with both hands touching, then down and up toward the left side (21b).  Step out with the left leg into a left bow stance with knee and torso facing towards SW8 (21b).  The sword is drawn upwards, slicing upwards, palm up, and the sword blade edge is held in a angled position relative to the floor (21b).  The right hand is draw in clockwise arc from the far right side (21a) to the far left side (21b), and ends being raised above the head, left arm out from body, with left palm facing to S6.  Look towards the tip of the sword (21b).   The sword is held high, above the head, with arms away from the body.  This position (21b) reminds us of the Yang hand form movement of "Fair Lady Works the Shuttles."   Position 21b is a repetition of 19c.    

 

 

22.  Pushing the Boat with the Current   (22a-22c)

 

 

This movement, #22, has various names: Stepping Forward and Piercing Back, Advance and Thrust Forward, Step Forward and Opposite Pierce, Push Boat with the Current; Twist, Advance and Thrust. 

Begin (22a) by stepping forward with the right leg into a twist step type of stance with the right knee and foot pointing to N12 (22b).  The left knee is tucked behind the right knee (22b).  As we step forward with the right leg, we turn the torso to the right bringing the center of the body to face N12 (22b).  As the body turns right, the sword is drawn downward in a counter-clockwise arc movement from the left side to the right side.  The sword points to E3 and we look towards E3 (22b).  The left arm moves downward and then points to W9 (22b).  From 22b, step forward with the left leg, moving into a left bow stance facing W9 (22c).  Draw the sword from right to left in a counter-clockwise arc, moving the sword to thrust in the direction of W9 (22c).  Move the left hand sword finger to touch the right wrist.  Hold the sword about head level and point the sword tip slightly down (22c).  The sword blade edge is held in a vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian.  Look towards the tip of the sword towards W9.  

 

 

23.  The Comet Chases the Moon   (23a-23b)

 

 

This movement, #23, has various names: Comet Chasing the Moon, Turn Body and Split Back, Reposition and Chop Back, Shooting Stars Chase the Moon, The Flying Star Chasing the Moon.   

Begin (23a) by transferring the weight of the body into the right leg while bending the right knee.  Pivot on the left heel, then gradually turn the torso to the right, clockwise from W9 towards E3.  Draw the sword overhead in a clockwise arc as you turn the torso to the right side (23a).  Pivot on the right heel, then draw the right leg back towards the left leg in a right empty stance.  Continue to turn to the right until your chest faces E3.   Step out with the right heel towards E4 and gradually settle into a right bow stance (23b).  The sword cuts downward until the blade is at shoulder height, with the tip of the sword facing E3.  The sword blade edge is held in a vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian.  The left hand ends being raised above the head, left arm out from body, with left palm facing to N12.  Look towards E3 at the tip of the sword.       

 

 

24.  The Heavenly Horse Gallops Across the Sky   (24a-24b)

 

 

This movement, #24, has various names: Heavenly Horse Flying Across the Sky, Point Sword with Empty Step, Point Sword with Empty Stance, Heavenly Horse Galloping Across the Sky, Flying Horse in the Sky.  

Begin (24a) by moving the left leg more towards the right into the center of the body, and then step forward with the left leg into an empty left stance.  At the same time, turning the torso counter-clockwise to face N12.  The sword is raised up to above the head, palm facing up, with the sword facing E4.  The left hand is draw down to about waist height.  (I think that there should be another illustration here between 22a-22b.)  Next, bring the weight down into the left leg, and step forward with the right leg into a right empty toe stance.  The torso faces at a slight angle towards N1.  The sword rises in an arc and then cuts downward.  Both arms are extended out at about shoulder height, with the left hand touching the right wrist, palms facing down.  The wrists are bent, and the sword is held so that the sword tip is low, pointing to the earth. .  The sword blade edge is held in a vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian.  Gaze towards the tip of the sword. 

 

 

Part Four:  Movements/Postures 25 - 32 

 

 

25.  Lifting the Door Curtain   (25a-25b)

 

 

This movement, #25, has various names: Standing on One Leg and Lifting Sword, Independent Level Support, Hold Sword with One Leg Up, Hook Up the Curtain, Lifting the Door Curtain. 

Begin (25a) by stepping back with the right leg behind the left leg.  Bring the right knee behind the left knee in a twist step stance.  At the same time as stepping back, bring the sword upward, palms facing up, left hand touching right wrist, and point the sword towards E2.  Move the sword in a counter-clockwise arc from right side up towards the left and then down, as the body sinks into more of a squatting position.  (I think another illustration is needed here between 25a-25b.)  Continue to swing the sword in an counter-clockwise arc from low right to high left.  As the sword moves upward, gradually rise up from the squatting position turning the body to face E3, and lifting the left leg up, drawing the knee upwards pointing towards E4, standing on the right leg (25b).  The arms move up to slightly above the head.  Hold the sword parallel to the floor, with the sword blade edge held in a vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian.   The right palm faces S6, and the left sword fingers touch the right hand.  Gaze towards E3. 

 

 

26.  Left Wheeling Chop Into a Right Bow Stance   (26a-26c)

 

 

This movement, #26, has various names: Cutting in a Bow Stance, Split with Bow Step, Hang-up Chop with Right Bow Stance, Left Wheeling Sword, Left Cart Wheels Sword.  

Begin (26a) by stepping forward with the left leg and placing the right knee behind the left knee in a twist step (26b), as the body turns to face N12.  As the body turns to the left the sword is drawn down in a clockwise arc from left to right (26a-26b).  The left hand continues to touch the right wrist until the arms reach the waist (26b).  The left hand releases from the right wrist at the waist.  The sword the continues upward in a clockwise arc (the Cart Wheel or Wheeling Chop movement) and then chops or cuts downward (26b).  The left arm is drawn in a counter-clockwise arc to a position above the head.  The body turns to face towards E3, stepping forward with the right leg into a right bow stance.  The sword stops at shoulder height, sword tip pointing to E3, with the sword blade edge held in a vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian.  The left hand ends being raised above the head, left arm out from body, with left palm facing to N12.  Look towards E3 at the tip of the sword.       

 

 

27.  Right Wheeling Chop Into a Right Empty Stance   (27a-27c)

 

 

This movement, #27, has various names: Cutting Downward in Empty Stance, Split with Empty Step, Wheel Chop with Empty Stance, Right Wheeling Sword. 

Begin (27a) by rotating the right heel to point the foot towards SW4 as you drawn the weight slightly back into the left leg..  Step forward with the left leg in a curve until the left foot faces toward NW2.  As the body turns to the right the sword is drawn down in a counter-clockwise arc from left to right (27a-27b).  The left hand is drawn towards the right shoulder (27b).  The head looks to SW7 and the sword points to SW7.  Rotate the right palm upward.  The sword the continues upward in a counter-clockwise arc (the Cart Wheel or Wheeling Chop movement) and then chops or cuts downward (27b-27c).  As the sword swings forward and downward (27b),  the torso turns to the left, the right leg steps forward into a right empty stance (27c), with the right toe facing N1 (27c).  As the body turns, the left arm is drawn in a clockwise circle to the left and then back to center.  The sword cuts downward and ends pointing towards the earth at an angle, with the sword blade edge held in a vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian (27c).  The left sword finger touches the right elbow.  The right wrist is relaxed, sword tip pointing downward. The torso is turned towards N1 (27c).   

 

 

28.  The Phoenix Spreads Its Wings   (28a-28b)

 

 

This movement, #28, has various names: Giant Geese Spreading Wings, Counter Attack with Feet Withdrawn, Retreat Step and Attack Backward, Phoenix Spreads Its Wing, Great Roc Spreads Its Wings, The Condor Spreads Its Wings. 

Begin (28a) by stepping with the right leg backwards until the right toe faces SW7, ending in a right bow stance (28b).  The left leg pivots on the left heel and the left foot turns to the right.  The sword slices upward, backwards, in a clockwise arc until the sword is pointing to SW7, at about shoulder height.  Pivot on the right heel to the left.  The left hand releases from the right forearm and opens so as to point to E2.  The sword blade is held at an angle, palm up.  Look towards the sword blade (28b). 

The movement from 28a to 28b reminds us of the Yang Taijiquan hand form movement called 'Slant Flying.'


“In the northern depths, there is a fish called the Kun It is countless leagues in size. This fish changes into a bird whose name is the Roc. Its back is countless leagues in breadth. When it rouses in flight, its wings are like clouds draping down over the heavens. The sea begins to move, as this bird is about to migrate to the southern depths, the Pool of Heaven."
-  Zhuangzi, 300 BCE

 

 

29.  The Bee Enters the Hive   (29a-29c)

 

 

This movement, #29, has various names: Stepping Forward to Thrust, Steps Forward Making Level Stab, Step Forward and Flat Pierce, Wasp Enters Its Nest, Yellow Bee Returns to Nest, The Hornet Flying Into the Hive.   

Begin (29a) by drawing the left leg back to the right leg, and lifting the left foot off the floor, and bringing the knee up. (29b).  The torso turns to the left to face S6.  Draw the sword blade in a counter-clockwise arc toward the left so as to bring the sword to shoulder height, blade tip pointed to E3 (29b).  The left sword finger is drawn toward the right to the right shoulder.  Step forward with the left leg and heel towards E3.  Then step forward with the right leg into a right bow stance (29c).  As the legs move towards E3, the torso also turns to the left until the chest faces E3 (29c), and the left hand is drawn in an arc towards the left side. The sword is thrust forward towards E3, held a shoulder height, palm up, with the sword blade horizontal relative to the floor, pengmian.  The left hand ends being raised above the head, left arm out from body, with left palm facing to N12.  Look towards E3 at the tip of the sword.         

 

30.  Holding the Moon   (30a-30b)

 

 

This movement, #30, has various names: Withdrawing Sword, Draw Back with T-Step, Pull Back Sword with T-Stance, Embrace the Moon, Holding the Moon with the Arms, Holding the Moon to the Bosom, Withdrawing the Sword in an Empty Stance. 

Begin (30a) by drawing the right hand towards the body and then moving the right hand down to the left hip area.  Step back with the left leg into a left empty stance.  Turn the torso towards the left side, chest facing N12 (30b).  Look towards E3.  The sword tip points upward, the sword blade is held in a vertical position relative to the floor, zhimian; and the left sword finger touches the right wrist (30b).  

This sequence and posture (30b) also appears in 7b above.  

 

 

31.  The Wind Sweeps the Plum Blossoms   (31a-31d)

 

 

This movement, #31, has various names: Wind Sweeping the Plum Blossoms, Turn and Erase, Rotate and Flat Slice, Wind Sweeps the Plum Blossoms, The Wind Sweeping the Plum Flower Petals, Plum Flowers Being Swept by the Wind. 

Begin (31a) by stepping with the right leg forward and to the right, toe pointing towards SE4 (31b).  Rotate sword so that the palm of the right hand is facing down (31a-31b).  The left sword fingers are on the right wrist.  Turn the body to the right in a clockwise circle, and as the body rotates keep the sword at about chest height, blade parallel with the floor.  Swing the left leg in a clockwise arc and then place the left foot so that the toes face W9, as the body rotates to face W9 (31c).  Swing the right leg in an arc back to the right and end by placing the foot to point to NE1.   The arms open and lower to waist/hip height.  The left hand points to NW10 and the right hand to NE2 (31d).  The sword tip points to N12, the sword blade at an angle.  The chest faces N12.  Draw the left leg into the body and take a left empty stance, with the weight in the back right leg (31d).   

 

32.  The Compass Needle   (32a-32d)

 

 

This movement, #32, has various names: Thrusting Forward in a Bow Stance, Step Straight with Bow Step, Forward Pierce with Left Bow Stance, Compass Needle Pointing North/South, The Compass Needle and Closing. 

Begin (32a) by stepping forward with the left leg towards NW11 into a left bow stance.  Thrust the sword forward at chest height towards NW11 (32b). 
Draw the weight back into the right leg, pivot on the left foot until the toe face N12.  Turn the torso towards NE2 as the sword is drawn back to the body, bending the right elbow (32c).  Grab the hilt of the sword with the left hand (32c).  The left hand moves forward as the sword is brought back behind the left arm, hilt facing down, sword tip to the sky, as the left hand is brought back beside the left thigh (32d).  Bring the right foot forward until the feet are in line, toes and torso facing N12, knees slightly bent, feet shoulder width apart (32d).  Draw the right hand up to about the nose, then slowly lower the right sword finger down, palm facing the earth.  As the right hand lowers, the knees unbent.  When the right hand comes down along the right thigh you should be standing up straight (32d).    

 

Conclusion, Closing, Ending

Stand in position (32d).  Feet are shoulder width.  Stand up straight, head held high.  Sword is in the left hand, sword tip pointed upwards.  The left hand is in the sword fingers position holding the sword hilt behind the hand.  Look forward to N12.  Right hand is alongside the right leg (32d).  Maintain this position for awhile.  Step with the left leg and bring the left foot beside the right foot. 

 

 

 

 

A note on the black and white illustrations: 

I believe that the illustrations (line drawings) came from the book:  "Simplified Taijiquan Sword, 32 Forms."  This is a small paperback textbook from the Beijing University of Sports Education, China, 55 pages, b&w.  The instructional book included 61 line drawings of the 32 movements.  The book was probably first published in the early 1960's, since the form was approved in 1957.  I do not have a copy of the publication, as of 10/1/07; but am seeking one. 

There is a readily available print publication with a complete set of these 61 black and white illustrations:  Tai Chi Sword: The 32 Simplified Forms (By Guangqi, Li; Chen, Zhao PhD; and Don G. Shao (Compiler).  Agilceed Books, England, 2006.  176 pages.  ISBN: 0976118327.)  Also, a complete or partial set of these illustrations are also being distributed on the Internet in .pdf, .gif, or .jpg formats on various webpages, blogs and newsgroups as cited above.

I reorganized the 61 illustrations into groups according to the Simplified 32 sword form movement sequence.  I repeated some illustrations to show the sequence of movements better for each movement group.  To my knowledge, this arrangement by 32 groups is unique to this webpage.  I modified and touched up the illustrations, placed them on a transparent background, and converted them into a more condensed .gif format.  I am seeking permission for inclusion of this modified version of these nice illustrations in this webpage from the Beijing University of Sports Education.  Hopefully, permission will be granted for educational purposes.  Keep in mind, however, that Chinese publishing is not bound by United States copyright laws, and vice versa.   

List of Movements, Complete 1-32, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List (PDF format)

 

 

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Disclaimer

Warning:  Practicing with Sword Weapons Can Be a Dangerous Activity for Adults

 

 

 

 

Jian Shu - Swordsmanship

 

 

 

Quotations
32 Movement Standard T'ai Chi Ch'uan Sword Form

Taijiquan Swordsmanship: Quotations, Notes, Tips, Commentary, History, Health, Mental, Principles

 

    "The 32 sword form is based on the principles of Yang style Tai Chi and is therefore not a vigorous exercise and is suitable for the elderly. With the exception of the preparation position and conclusion, this form contains 32 movements divided into four sections. The complete exercise when learnt lasts
about two to three minutes and can be practiced alone or in a group."
-   Tai Chi Australia  

 

    "Taiji Sword is one of short weaponry routines of tai chi boxing integrated with tai chi boxing and swordplay techniques. 32-form taiji sword was adapted from Yang-Style Tai Chi Sword by Chinese martial arts master Li Tianji.  The set of routines is dissected in 2 sections, 2 returns and 32 movements. The 32-form taiji sword was supported by the National Physical Education Committee."
-   CGC Mall

 

    "Tai Chi Sword is a weaponry form of Tai Chi practice, in which the sword is viewed as an extension of body, not a separate part of Tai Chi practice. All Tai Chi weaponry forms preserve the same principles of Tai Chi Chuan (the hand form of Tai Chi). The practice of Tai Chi sword requires a person to follow the sword forms correctly, to balance the sword with body well, and to apply power to the right of point of force. It also requires the person to understand and display as well the meanings of offensive and defensive moves within each form. It is important to show accurately shift of body weight,
the empty (insubstantial) and solid (substantial) moves, and the variations of sword forms. The ultimate goal is to move the body and sword in unity with right balance and rhythm.
    In 1957, the Chinese Sports Committee developed a simplified version of Tai Chi Sword based primarily on the Yang style.  This simplified form is a series of 32 sword forms that can be performed in about three or five minutes. It was designed as an easily learned series of movements that could be used by anyone to improve their health."
-  Cheng Zhao, Ph.D, Indiana State University, Tai Chi Sword - The 32 Simplified Forms

 

Taijiquan Swordsmanship: Quotations, Notes, Tips, History, Health, Techniques, Mental, Principles

13 Sword Techniques

 

 

 

 

Jian Shu - Swordsmanship

 

 

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Principles of Taijiquan Sword Practice

Principles of Tai Chi Ch'uan Swordplay by Mike Garofalo

13 Sword Techniques

Quotations and Poems about Taiji Swordplay

 

 

 


Jian - Sword

 

 

 

Comparison

Comparison of the Standardized Simplified 32 Sword Form with the Yang Style 55 Taijiquan Sword Form

© Michael P. Garofalo, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008. 

 

Sword forms, sword practice routines, sword fencing, swordplay in theater, and sword dances are all of very ancient origin in China.  Professor Hermann Bohn told me that "There always has been a distinct differentiation between the sword dancers (like Li Bo and other literati), who did the wenjian, lighter and more for self-cultivation; and, on the other side, the martial swordsmen, who did the heavier, warfare orientated wujian."  Most soldiers and sword fighters were trained to use the curved broadsword or saber (Dao), which is heavier, single edged, cheaper to manufacture, and easier to learn how to use. 

The Chen style of Taijiquan included broadsword, staff and spear practices starting in the 1670's, but the teachings were not made available to the general public.  By the middle of the 1800's, Taijiquan had become recognized in China as a distinct style of martial arts.  However, various scholars have reported that there is little documentation or evidence showing how the double edged straight sword (jian) was being taught in private Taijiquan schools.  The founder of Yang Style Taijiquan, Yang Lu Chan (1799-1872) lived during the time of the active use of swords and other traditional weapons in self-defense, and was familiar with sword fencing, swordsmanship, and the practical applications of sword techniques.   However, his sons, Yang Pan Hou (1837-1890) and Yang Jian Hou (1839-1917), lived during the period when the availability of firearms and artillery, and their use in military and police actions, rendered the use of swords, spears, staff, and the bow and arrow obsolete.  Also, the Republic of China was established in 1912, replacing the Qing Dynasty, and ended the restrictions on the public study and practice of martial arts or folk wushu.  Therefore, in the early 1900's, some teachers began teaching internal martial arts and Taijiquan to the general public, e.g., Sun Lu Tang 孫祿堂 (1861-1933) and Yang Cheng Fu 楊澄甫 (1883-1936).  These teachers emphasized a slower and more refined Taijiquan for fitness, self-cultivation, health maintenance, group camaraderie, integration with Taoist philosophy, qigong, public health, sports competition, and the perseveration of traditional martial arts. 

In 1928, the first small book on the Taijiquan double edged straight sword (Jian) form was published: The Taiji Sword.  It's author, Chen Weiming 陳微明 (real name: Chen Zengze 陳曾則) (1881-1958) was a scholar, historian, and taijiquan instructor.  Chen Weiming studied with Sun Lu Tang, and with General Li Jing Lin (Fang Chen) (1885-1931), a Wudang sword master.  Chen Weiming was a senior student and close friend of the famous Taijiquan Grand Master Yang Cheng Fu, and collaborated with Yang Cheng Fu when publishing three taijiquan books.  Chen says little about techniques, and notes that Yang Cheng Fu "never taught a specific set of sword (Jian) fencing."  By 1928, the emphasis was upon sword form practice; and, not on fencing, applications drills, and techniques.  The sword form described and pictured in the 1928 book, Taiji Sword, with 55 movements, has become the public version of the  "classical" or "traditional Yang Taijiquan" straight sword form after it was integrated into the Yang style of Taijiquan curriculum in the early 1900's.   There are numerous variations of this 55 movement form, but the core movements remain.    

Chen Weiming's book was translated into English with a commentary by Barbara Davis in 2000.  Numerous authors, all cited above, have also written books about the 55 movement classical public Taijiquan sword form in the Yang style, e.g., Petra Kobayashi (2003), Scott M. Rodell (2003), and Yang Jwing Ming (1999).  Numerous instructional media also exist for learning the Taijiquan Yang 55 Sword Form.      

In 1955, a Taijiquan Physical Education Taijiquan Subcommittee used the "classical" taijiquan sword form in the Yang style, 55 movement form, as documented by Chen Weiming in 1928, and other swordplay sources, as the foundation for creating the Standard (Orthodox) Simplified Taijiquan 32 Sword Form.  In 1957, the Chinese National Physical Education Committee approved the subcommittee's recommendations, and decided that the Standardized (Orthodox) Simplified 32 Sword Form would be used in physical education and wushu classes as an introductory Taijiquan swordplay form.  Since then, the standard simplified 32 sword form has become very popular in China and all around the world.  Numerous instructional media, books, and webpages exist for learning the 32 Taijiquan Sword Form.    

Keep in mind that some Yang style Taijiquan teachers teach 32 sword form and some the 55 sword form, and a few might not appreciate your confusing the two forms.  Remember, the 32 sword form was developed by a sports committee sponsored by the Communist Party government.  On the other hand, some Taijiquan Masters of the Yang Style from Taiwan or Hong Kong, and those who actively supported the Chinese Nationalist Party in the 1940's, like Professor Cheng Man Ching, significantly influenced Taijiquan sword teaching in the USA.  So ... be flexible, sensitive, and 'when in Rome do as the Romans do.'  You might learn both the 32 and 55 Yang style sword forms to expand your Taijiquan swordplay horizons, skills, and expertise.   The 32 sword form is practiced by many persons, even by those who do not practice Yang Style Taijiquan.     

As with most longer Taijiquan sword forms, the ordering of the moves and the numbering sequence differs a little from teacher to teacher in the long "classical" Taijiquan sword form.  You will see the public and common Classical Taijiquan Sword Form, adopted by the Yang Taijiquan tradition, in versions with 50 movements, 51 movements, 53 movements (Petra Kobayashi), 54 movements (Yang Jwing Ming, Sam Masich), 55 movements (Chen Weiming), 56 movements (Peter Lim Tian Tek), 61 movements (Stuart Alve Olson), 64 movements (Xin Qi Shen Dojo), and 67 movements (Yang Zhen Duo and Yang Jun, Jiang Jian-ye).  It will depend on whether or not opening and closing movements are included, how some longer movement sequences are defined and numbered, added repetitions, and unique variations, etc.  Also, the directions of some of the movements do vary from teacher to teacher. 

List of Movements, Complete 1-32, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List  

Classical Tai Chi Sword, List of Movements, Yang Style, 55 Movements, Valley Spirit Taijiquan List

 

 


 

 

Simplified Taiji 32 Sword Form (1957)

 

Classical Taiji 55 Sword Form (1928)

 

     Preparation and Opening  #1.  Taiji Sword Beginning Posture

Part One:  Movements/Postures 1 - 8
 

 
1.  Three Rings Around the Moon #2.  Three Rings Circle the Moon 
2.  The Big Dipper #3.  Great Star of the Literary God 
3.  The Swallow Skims Across the Water #4.  Swallow Searches the Water
4.  Block and Sweep to the Right #5.  Right Block and Sweep
5.  Block and Sweep to the Left  #6.  Left Block and Sweep
6.  Searching the Sea  #7.  Small Star of the Literary God 
7.  Holding the Moon #18, #36.  Clasping the Moon to the Bosom 
8.  The Bird Returns to the Tree at Dusk
 
#19.  Bird Goes to Roost in the Forest
 

Part Two:  Movements/Postures 9 -16 
 

 
9.   The Black Dragon Whips His Tail  #20.  Black Dragon Wags Its Tail
10.  The Green Dragon Emerges from the Water #21.  The Wind Curls the Lotus Leaves
11.  Turning Around and Carrying the Sword  #21.  Wind Curls the Lotus Leaves, #21.  Lion Shakes Its Head
12.  The Lion Shakes His Mane  #22.  Lion Shakes Its Head
13.  The Tigress Holds Her Head #22, #48.  Tiger Holds Its Head
14.  The Wild Horse Leaps Over the Creek #24.  Wild Horse Jumps the Mountain Stream
15.  Cutting Upward in Left Empty Stance   
16.  Scooping the Moon From the Bottom of the Sea
 
#35  Fishing the Moon Out from the Bottom of the Sea 
 
Part Three: Movements/Postures 17-24
 
 
17.  The Rhinoceros Gazes at the Moon  #38.  Rhinoceros Gazes at the Moon
#39, #43.  Shooting the Wild Goose 
18.  The White Ape Offers the Fruit #40, #44.  White Ape Presents the Fruit 
19.  Parrying in Left Bow Stance #28.  Shaking the Duster in the Wind
20.  Parrying in Right Bow Stance #28.  Shaking the Duster in the Wind
21.  Parrying in Left Bow Stance #28.  Shaking the Duster in the Wind
22.  Pushing the Boat with the Current #29.  Following the Current, Pushing the Boat
23.  The Comet Chases the Moon  #30.  Shooting Star Catches Up with the Moon
24.  The Heavenly Horse Gallops Across the Sky
 
#31.  Heavenly Horse Travels the Void
 
Part Four: Movements/Postures 25-32
 
 
25.  Lifting the Door Curtain #32.  Roll Up the Screen 
26.  Left Wheeling Chop Into a Right Bow Stance #33.  Left and Right Cart Wheels Sword
27.  Right Wheeling Chop Into a Right Empty Stance #33.  Left and Right Cart Wheels Sword
28.  The Phoenix Spreads Its Wings #34.  Great Peng Spreads Wings 
#41.  Phoenix Spreads Its Wings
29.  The Bee Enters the Hive #11.  The Wasp Enters the Cave
30.  Holding the Moon #36.  Clasping the Moon to the Bosom 
31.  The Wind Sweeps the Plum Blossoms  #52.  Wind Sweeps the Plum Blossoms   
32.  The Compass Needle #54, #27.  The Compass
        Withdrawing the Sword and Closing #55.  Enfolding the Sword, Return to the Beginning


 

 

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Jian - Sword

 

 

 T'ai Chi Ch'uan Straight Sword Techniques

13 Taiji Jian Techniques

Taijiquan Sword and Broadsword Techniques

 


 

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Learning the Simplified 32 Sword Form

 

© Michael P. Garofalo, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008. 

 

    If you are fortunate enough to be working directly with a Taijiquan sword instructor in a group class or in private lessons, then listen carefully to your instructor, carefully repeat the movements as they are taught to you, and practice on a daily basis. 

    Many Taijiquan enthusiasts live in areas where there are no Taijiquan sword instructors.  Fortunately, however, in this contemporary "Electronic Age," we have an ample number of very useful options and resources to help us continue our study and progress in learning the Taijiquan sword.  There are many fine Taijiquan master teachers who have worked diligently to develop, produce, and publish Taijiquan sword instructional DVDs or instructional videotapes for us to use.  Also, there are numerous print publications and websites on the Taijiquan sword for us to utilize. 

    The suggestions that follow below are intended for a person that does not have in-person and live access to a Taijiquan sword instructor.  It assumes that they will be learning the 32 sword form on their own at their home using electronic and print resources.   

    I have not been able to review all the resources available that provide instructions and/or demonstrations of the Simplified 32 sword form; but, I have seen, studied and reviewed quite a few of these resources

 

Here are my recommendations for learning resources: 


1.  Tai Chi: The 32 Sword Forms.  Instructional DVD and VHS videotape.  Presentation by Dr. Paul Lam.  ASIN: B00005U59Y.  95 minutes.  Step by step teaching, slow and normal speeds, multiple views.  Includes demonstration of the 48 Form set.  East Action Video, Narwee, Australia, 1996.  The teaching is done indoors in a nice studio with excellent lighting.  Dr. Lam has his students slowly demonstrate the movements as he describes in detail how the movements are to be done.  Then Dr. Lam demonstrates the movement slowly from a front view.  Then, the student demonstrates the movement from both front, side and back views at normal speed.  All instruction is in English, with good clear audio, ample volume, and very understandable.  The entire 32 sword form is demonstrated by Dr. Lam with front and back views.  $39.95 VHS from various vendors.  


2.   Tai Chi Sword: The 32 Simplified Forms.   By Guangqi, Li; Chen, Zhao PhD; and Don G. Shao (Compiler).  Agilceed Books, England, 2006.  176 pages.  ISBN: 0976118327.  Simple and clear line drawings.  Large but mediocre quality photos.  Large-print style of text.  Fairly clear, but brief explanations of each movement sequence.  Questions and answers.  References.  List of movement names: literal, figurative, and in Chinese.  Brief commentary on Tai Chi swordplay.  As far as I know now, the only book in print on the subject in English.  $19.95 book from Amazon.   


3.   Simplified Tai Chi Sword Form 32.  Instructional DVD or videocassette.  60 minutes.  Instruction by Master Jesse Tsao, from San Diego, CA.  Tai Chi HealthwaysVideo online version.   No date of publication provided.  The 32 sword form is taught in 8 lessons.  Demonstrations of the entire form from front and back views.  Each lesson consists of:  a) a demonstration of 3 or 4 movements in the lesson with English subtitles, b)  clear, slow, and detailed instructions in understandable English of each component of each movement with multiple demonstrations, and c) continuous demonstration of all movements in the lesson in normal speed with front and side views.  Very nice park or lush backyard setting in the background.  For each lesson, the sound is clear, with ample volume, and the English is easy to understand.  Slow Chinese music is in the background during the continuous demonstrations.   $34.95 DVD or VHS from Tai Chi Healthways.  There are some minor differences between the 32 Form as taught by Dr. Lam and Dr. Tsao.  The DVD format is easy to use with a good functional Menu structure.   


4.  Sword - T'ai Chi Ch'uan, 32 Form, Yang Style, Taijiquan Jian.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  This popular webpage includes a comprehensive bibliography, scores of links to webpages; an extensive listing of the names and name variations for each movement  in English, Chinese, French, German, and Spanish; a detailed analysis of each posture and movement sequence with explanations and numbered illustrations and detailed instructions; selected quotations; comments on 20 Taijiquan sword techniques; a comprehensive media bibliography; a chart of performance times; and, a comparison of the 32 and 55 sword forms in the Yang style.  © Michael P. Garofalo, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, January 2008.  245Kb+. 
 

 

Here are some methods, techniques, tips, recommendations, and suggestions for learning on you own at home: 


1.  Purchase the recommended instructional VHS videotape, book and instructional DVD.  These purchases will cost under $100.000. 

2.  Purchase a Tai Chi sword: wood or metal.  This purchase will cost from $30 to $100.  If you use a cane or stick, it may cost you nothing.  While holding the sword in your hand by your left hip, in the starting position, the sword tip should be around the level of your left ear. 

3.  View or read all four of the above resources one time in one week.  Read the instructions for learning given below.  Think about your tactics for learning the 32 sword form.  Set up a 3 ring binder notebook to help you organize all your notes and printouts while learning the 32 sword form.     

4.  Decide on whether you will use Dr. Lam (DVD or VHS) or Master Tsao (DVD or VHS) as you first 32 sword form instructor.  Use one or the other at first, but not both.  Some people prefer using a VHS videotape and others a DVD.  If you only use DVDs, then consider purchasing other instructional DVD media listed above, e.g., Jiang Jian-ye's DVD. 

5.  Carefully study the first lesson (Movements #1 - #4) on the instructional DVD/VHS.  Observe and study very carefully.  Refer to Part One:  Movements/Postures 1 - 8.  I prefer studying and then practicing two movements at a time. 

6.  Practice the first lesson on your own until you are satisfied that you are performing the moves correctly.  Memorize the names for each movement.  Practice the movements with a sword, and sometimes with just a stick or cane the same length as your sword.   Keep in mind that movement names and techniques mentioned vary from teacher to teacher - keep and open mind. 

7.  Read and study the recommended book.  Write out the instructions for difficult or hard to learn movements.   Add your notes to your 3 ring binder.   Writing yourself helps you memorize the postures and movement sequences. 

8.  Some movements are more complex than others.  You may need to practice just one movement over and over until you feel confident and comfortable with that movement.  Don't rush.  Relax.  Practice the first lesson over and over and over until you are satisfied that you are performing the moves correctly. 

9.  Read and study the recommended webpage.  Follow some of the links.  View some of the online UTube videos.  Read the instructions on the webpage for the first lesson.  Print out this webpage. 

10. Practice the first lesson over and over until you are satisfied that you are performing the moves correctly.  Memorize all of the names of the movements.  Write out instructions for difficult or hard to learn movements.  Repeat in your mind the names and correct sequence for each movement; the verbal repetition of instructions is one technique for learning.  Listen carefully to your instructor on the DVD or VHS.   

11.  Read and study the recommended book.  Print out the lists of movements from the recommended webpage.  We must be able to "picture" the movement in our minds; therefore, look a photographs or graphic illustrations of the movements.  Study the printouts when you are fresh and relaxed.  

12.  Proceed to study the second lesson (Movements #5 - #8).  Repeat the learning method above (Steps 5 - 11) for Lesson 2.  Refer to Part One:  Movements/Postures 1 - 8

13.  Practice movements #1 - #8 over and over and over until you are satisfied that you are performing the moves correctly.  Mentally visualize doing the form many times.  Write in your journal about your progress.  Some people make a voice recording of the names of the movements on audiotape or MP3, and play the recording while practicing. 

14.  Repeat the above learning method (Steps 5 -13) for all eight lessons.   Refer to Part Two:  Movements/Postures 9 -16,  Part Three: Movements/Postures 17-24Part Four: Movements/Postures 25-32.  Continue, however, to drill by separate lessons as well as working on a continuous combination of 2 or 3 lessons (i.e., 8 -12 movements). 

15.  Practice movements #1 - #32 over and over and over until you are satisfied that you are performing the moves correctly.  Rehearse the movements in your mind before you go to sleep.  Browse the book to refresh your memory.  Watch videos of different students and masters performing the 32 sword form. 

16.  Practice movements #1 - #32 over and over and over until you are satisfied that you are performing the moves correctly.  We must feel the movements in our body, kinesthetic learning, for us to be able to "learn" them and make them our own in the body-mind-spirit.   

17.  Study the second VHS/videotape carefully.  Note and consider variations.  Consider purchasing other instructional media on the 32 sword form. 

18.  Read and study the recommended book.  Use photographs, illustrations, and video to help you clearly visualize every movement.  Browse the book during your lunch hour, in the early morning, during a quiet moment in the evening.  Reading and re-reading helps you learn. 

19.  Memorize all the names of the 32 movements.   I cannot over emphasize the and verbal components for learning and memorization. 

20.  See if you can find or interest others in your "local" area with whom you might start a Tai Chi sword study group.  With more eyes and ears, and with group practice, you can often learn even more; as well as have others to practice sword techniques with in drills.  You could get the ball rolling and coordinate communications.  Everyone could participate in some aspect of sharing something new about Taiji swordsmanship that they have learned.  For example, each could study and learn about one Taijiquan sword technique and then share with others at your next meeting.  What techniques are being used in each movement?  You could drill together on sword attack and response techniques; after you put on good eye cover and padded hand gloves and are using wooden swords-  for safety purposes.  Please use caution and note my Disclaimer

25.  Practice movements #1 - #32 over and over and over until you are satisfied that you are performing the moves correctly.   Explore all links and references on the recommended webpage.  There are many useful resources online.  Use wide reading to gain more knowledge.   Practice the form at a  different pace: from fast to slow. 

26.   If possible, consider attending a 32 Tai Chi sword form workshop or take a private lesson from a Taijiquan sword instructor to get feedback, ideas, and further instructions.  Direct personal instruction is invaluable.  However, for many of us, travel and workshops/lessons can be quite expensive, and traveling a considerable distance does have some negative environment impact.  Learning on your own at home is far less expensive: from $130 to $300 in total expenses, and your learning resources are available to you all the time (24/7).  You might spend more than $200 just to travel to a single 32 sword workshop in a big city in America, or to travel to a few private lessons in a big city in America; not even including the cost of the training (instructor's fees) or lodging expenses.  Consider purchasing additional 32 sword form instructional DVD/VHS products ... move the teacher to you, rather than you moving yourself to the teacher.   

27.  Practice movements #1 - #32 over and over and over until you are satisfied that you are performing the moves correctly.  You learn by repetition.  You learn by continuous practice.  Let the form become your form by conscious efforts and ongoing practice.    

28.  Review the instructional DVD or VHS, book and webpage over and over to help you learn the 32 sword form.  You learn by carefully observing and respectfully listening to the master teachers.  Keep and open mind.  Note and compare differences in the performances of the movements. 

29.  Start learning more about the Classical Yang Taijiquan Sword 55 Movement Form.  The 32 sword form evolved out of the 55 Yang Sword Form. 

30.  Practice movements #1 - #32 over and over and over until you are satisfied that you are performing the moves correctly.  You should be able to verbally describe each movement, have the name of each movement memorized, and be able to repeat the entire sequence verbally from memory.  You should be able to clearly visualize the entire 32 Sword form.  Can you help a beginner learn the 32 sword form?  Providing instruction to beginners can help you refine your understanding and skills. 

31.  Read and learn more about Chinese swords and sword masters.  Read and learn about Japanese swords and sword masters.  Read and learn about the Chinese broadsword.   Watch some sword movies, e.g., "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon."  Learn more about the techniques of the Taiji sword.  Learn more about the fearsomeness, calmness, bravery, attitudes, history, psychology, and philosophy of the swordsman. 

32.    Pat yourself on the back!   Rejoice!   Congratulate yourself!  Your are in better physical condition from all of your sword practice.  You can perform a very beautiful Taijiquan sword form!  You have increased confidence because of your success.  You have learned how to learn on your own.  You have learned the most popular Taijiquan sword form practiced all around the world.  You know something about Chinese swordsmanship.  You have started along the Way of the Sword.  Have you saved enough to purchase a good Taiji straight sword as a reward for learning the 32 Sword Form?  You now have much more to learn and many hundreds of hours of practice ahead of you to improve your skills.  Always keep a beginner's mind, an open mind, a "Can Do" attitude, a willingness to listen, and an enthusiasm for continued progress.  Set up some new objective and goals for learning about the Taijiquan sword and broadsword.  Yes!  Good Work!! 

Again ....  Bravo, Kudos, Congratulations! 

Best wishes for continued success,

Mike Garofalo
January 2008
Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California

 

 

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© Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California, 2006-2011.  All Rights Reserved.
First Distributed on the Internet in November, 2006.

Michael P. Garofalo's E-mail

 

Valley Spirit Taijiquan

Red Bluff, Tehama County, North Sacramento Valley, Northern Central California, U.S.A.
Cities in the area: Oroville, Paradise, Durham, Chico, Hamilton City, Orland, Willows, Corning,
Rancho Tehama, Los Molinos, Tehama, Proberta, Gerber, Manton, Cottonwood,
Anderson, Shasta Lake, Palo Cedro, and Redding, CA, California.

Who is Michael P. Garofalo

Cloud Hands: Taijiquan and Qigong

 
 
© Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, 2006-2011

太极拳 楊氏

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TAGS   INDEX  Subject Headings    Search Terms

32 Sword Taiji Taijiquan Tai Chi Chuan
32 Taiji Taijiquan Tai Chi Chuan Sword Jian Swordplay
Thirty Two 32 Taiji Taijiquan Tai Chi Chuan Sword Jian Swordplay
32 Tai Chi Sword Jian Gim  Yang Tai Chi Chuan  Taijiquan Style
Yang Style 32 Sword Form
Standard Simplified Orothodox 32 Tai Chi Sword Routine Form
Simplified Thirty Two Sword Form
32 Straight Sword Routine  32 Jian
32 Taiji Taijiquan Tai Chi Chuan Sword Jian Swordplay
32 Form Taiji Sword
32 Swordplay Postures
32 Jian Shu, 32 Jian Shi
Yang 32 Sword Jian Form
32 Sword Form Yang Style 
Tai Chi Yang Sword Form 32 Jian 
32 Simplified Yang Style Sword Form