Chen Style Taijiquan
Grandmaster Chen Xiao Wang
19 Movements Routine, 1995


Research by

Michael P. Garofalo




Bibliography     List of Chen 19 Movements     Instructions and Comments     Videos     Links

Old Frame, First Form (Laojia Yilu) 74     Chen Style of Taijiquan     Taijiquan     Qigong    

Silk Reeling     Standing     Fang Song - Relax     Rooting     Learning Notes     New    

Chen Taijiquan 18 Form     Hunyuan Chen Taijiquan 24     Taiji Stick  


Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

Chen Style Taijiquan "Short" Routines

Includes Information on many Chen Taijiquan "Short" Routines (Forms): 13, 18, 19, 24, 36, 38, 56

Green Way Research, Michael P. Garofalo, Valley Spirit Center, Fir Grove, Vancouver, Washington, 2018-
 


 

 

 

 

Bibliography, Links, Resources, Research

 

Chen Style Taijiquan
Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang's Short Tai Chi Hand Form of 19 Movements, 1995
 

 

This short Chen Taijiquan Form was created by Grandmaster Chen Xiao Wang in 1995.    


Ancestral Chen Tai Chi Posture 19 Forms.  Teaching by Chen Xiaowang.  Instructional DVD. 


Beginning the Study of Chen Taijiquan  


Cane, Short Staff, and Staff Weapons of Chen Style Taijiquan    Chen Staff Forms  I practice the lively Chen Broadsword (Dao, Saber) Routine with my cane. 


Chen: Living Taijiquan in the Classical Style.  By Master Jan Silberstorff.  Jessica Kingsley Publications, 1st Edition, June, 2009.  320 pages.  ISBN: 1848190212.  "Chen style Taijiquan is the oldest of the five main Taijiquan styles. In this book, Master Jan Silberstorff, a leading Chen practitioner, student of Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang, shares his expertise and insights. He explains the background to Taijiquan, and its key principles, and gives the reader a true insight into the Chen system. Master Silberstorff sets this within the historical context of Taijiquan in China, its country of origin, and explains the martial, health and spiritual aspects of traditional Chen Taijiquan. He discusses the different Chen forms and the importance of each, as well as the place of competition and the effect on participants. The book also contains the complete sequences for both the empty hand and weapon forms. This accessible and comprehensive guide to Chen style Taijiquan is ideal for beginners and will also be useful to advanced practitioners wanting to deepen their practice."  VSCL. 


 

Chen Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan: Thirty Six and Fifty-Six Movements.  By Xing Yanling.  Translated by Mei Xuexiong.  Japan Pub., 1993.  173 pages.  ISBN: 978-0870409097.  VSCL. 


Chen Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan, Wikipedia

 
Chen Style Tai Chi Essential 18 Postures with Patrick Martin.  Instructional DVD, 2 DVDs, 238 minutes.  Disk 1, 130 Minutes.  Jade Dragon Tai Chi International, Empty Circle Productions, 2008.  VSCL.  Patrick Martin is a student of Grandmaster Chen Zhenglei, and has been practicing and teaching Chen style Tai Chi for the last 20 years.  Detailed instruction for each movement sequence. 


Chen Style Tai Chi Old Frame Routine One.  Lao Jia Yi Lu, Old Frame, First Form.  Demonstration and instruction by Master Jesse Tsao.  2 instructional DVDs or VHS videotapes, 60 minutes each DVD.  All instruction is in the English language.  Includes a good Menu system on the DVD that works.  The instruction is a bit rushed and lacks the good detailed instruction found on other DVDs by Master Tsao that I own.  Master Tsao speaks as he moves, and the audio is clear.  The background is an outdoor scene, with shrubbery as a background, in color, and good clear footage. Front and back views of each movement are provided, with summary performances of sections with a ocean shoreline background view.   "The original Chen style Tai Chi is the oldest style practiced today and is widely acknowledged to be the ancestor of all other styles. It is characterized by whole-body twining, coiling movements, and occasionally explosive releases of power. It is an ancient form which fully encompasses the Tai Chi principles from stillness via soft relaxed movements to fast & dynamic applications, which can be performed vigorously or gently according to the condition of ones body.  This DVD video teaches the Old Frame Routine One posture by posture in both front view and back view with review and explanations by Master Tsao.  There are also self-healing and self-defense applications explained throughout the teaching."  Produced by Tai Chi Healthways, San Diego, California.   Master Tsao told me that "Yes, my DVD on the Old Frame First Routine was based on Chen Zhenglei's teaching. He has come to me [in San Diego] for the last five years."  Complete demonstration on Tape 2, rear view, 11:03 minutes, by Jesse Tsao.  VSCL.   


Chen Style Taijiquan.  Written and compiled by Feng Zhiqiang and Feng Dabiao.  Hong Kong, Hai Feng Publishing Co., Zhaohua Publishing House, 1984.  227 pages.  ISBN: 9622380166.  Overview, profiles of teachers, review of 83 movement form, and a very informative review of attack and defense using the Chen style movements.  One of the first books in English on Chen Style Taijiquan.  VSCL.  


The Chen Style Taijiquan for Life Enhancement.  Written by Chen Zhenglei and translated by Xu Hailing.  Zhongzhou Classic Publishing House, Zhengzhou, China, 2002.  Text in English and Chinese.  ISBN: 7534821819.  149 pages.  "Describes the principles of Chen style for life enhancement, basic training, Taiji Skills for Preserving Energy and The 18 Forms of the Chen Style. Many photos of Chen Zhenglei doing Exercises and forms. Chen Zhenglei is one of the top Chen stylists in China. Paperback.149 pp. 5 1/2' by 8'. $19.00."  -  Wayfarer Publications   "It covers the content of the health exercise silk reeling video, and is a useful reference,  giving more detail, especially on theory." 
Wushu Center.  VSCL   


Chen Style Taijiquan: Bibliography, Guides, Links, Lessons, Forms, Weapons  


Chen Style Taijiquan Notepad.  By Christopher David Weinmann.   Comprehensive index of resources on Chen Taijiquan. 


Chen Style Taijiquan, Old Frame First Form, Lao Jia Yi Lu.  By Michael P. Garofalo.  Detailed bibliography of books, media, and articles.  Extensive selection of Internet links.  List of movement names in English, Chinese characters, Chinese Pinyin, French, German, and Spanish; and citations for sources of the movement names.  Detailed list of videos available online.  Extensive notes on the author's learning the Old Frame, First Routine, Lao Jia Yi Lu; and on learning Chen Taijiquan.  Record of performance time of this form by many masters.  Breakdown by sections, with separate lists for each section.  General information, history, facts, information, pointers, and quotations. 


Chen Style Taijiquan 56 Competition Form Standard


Chen Style Taijiquan: The Source of Taiji Boxing.  By Davidine Siaw-Voon Sim and David Gaffney.  Berkeley, CA, North Atlantic Books, 2002.  Index, charts, 224 pages.  ISBN: 1556433778.   Provides an excellent introduction to Chen style Taijiquan history and legends, outlines the major forms, discusses the philosophy and foundations of the art, and gives very good information on training methods, push hands, and weapons.  Very well written, highly informative, and a unique contribution to the field.  Essential reading for all learning the Chen style of Tai Chi Chuan.  The Hand Forms (Taolu) are described on pp. 110-141.  VSCL. 


Chen Style Taijiquan: The 36 forms.  By Professor Kan Gui Xiang and Dr. Paul Lam.  Sydney, Australia, East Action Publishing, 1992.   189 pages.  Photographs by John Tourtas.  ISBN: 0646069934.  Professor Kan Gui Xing was an Associate Professor of Physical Science at the Beijing Institute of Physical Science for 36 years and retired in 2000.  She was born in 1940.  This excellent book, with an accompanying DVD or videotape, that can be used by beginners to learn this fine modern simplified version of the Chen family Taijiquan.  The DVD/videotape is titled "Tai Chi Chen Style 36 Forms" by Dr. Paul Lam.  It includes step-by-step instructions by Dr. Lam for one of the world's best known Chen style short forms.  The DVD/videotape includes a demonstration by the creator, Professor Kan.  Produced in Narwee, Australia, by East Action Video in 1993.  The videotape is 100 minutes long.  VSCL.  

 


 

Chen Tai Chi Academy, Poole, England.  Sifu Mark Ditcher.  18 Form instructions and videos.   


Chen Tai Chi Chuan, Old Frame First Form , Lao Jia Yi Lu, 74 Movements


Chen Tai Chi Fighting Applications.  Instructional DVD by Sifu Ken Gullette.  3 DVD discs.  Sifu Gullette explores Laojia Yilu, a 75-movement Chen Taijiquan form and the first major form in Chen Tai Chi.  In this one form, he uncovers over 400 realistic and powerful fighting techniques, and and no movements are repeated.  Sifu Gullette goes even deeper than just the fighting applications.  He explains and demonstrates the internal body mechanics that give these techniques their power.  The fighting techniques in this form involve punches, palm strikes, kicks, knee strokes, shoulder and elbow strikes, chin-na, throws and takedowns.  It's a complete fighting art in one form. These DVDs have been praised even by disciples of Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang.  Since some movements are similar to those of other tai chi styles, any tai chi student and teacher will get insights into their art by watching the principles and techniques in these DVDs."  VSCL. 


Chen Tai Chi Laojia Yilu.  By Ken Gullette.  Instructional DVD, 2 Disc Set, 5 hours and 3 minutes of Instruction, NTSC Format.  Moline, Illinois, Internal Fighting Arts, 2015.  In-depth coaching on internal body dynamics.  Internal Fighting Arts of Ken Gullette, copyright 2015.  Sifu Ken Gullette was certified in 2005 as an instructor through Grandmaster Chen Xiaoxing's school in the Chen Villiage, China.  Sifu Gullette demonstrates the complete form from both a front and back view.  Detailed and informative verbal instructions and precise physical demonstrations are provided by Sifu Gullette for each of the 75 movements in this traditional form.  A strong emphasis on internal body mechanics.  Spiraling methods are given for the arms and hands.  Martial applications are shown.  Excellent coaching by Sifu Gullette for beginners learning this form.  Instruction is done with front, side, and rear views to facilitate visual learning.  Good English language is used: direct, explicit, detailed, informative, with a calm and pleasant voice in a typical practical American style.  Very good attention to the legs: postures, movements, weighting, shifting, stepping angles, and principles.  Five hours of superior instruction for an very affordable DVD at $29.95 in 2016.  This DVD lacks a good menu system - its only drawback.  You have to jump forward section by section to get to where you want to go. Sifu Gullette teaches Chen Style Taijiquan.  VSCL.  


Chen T'ai Chi, Volume 1: Traditional Instructions from the Chen Village.  Various authors: Michael DeMarco, Asr Cordes, Stephan Berwich, David Gaffney, Miriam O'Conner, Dietmar Stubenbaum, Jiaxiang Wong.  Via Media Publishing Company, 2015.  132 pages.  ISBN: 978-1893765085.  "When we think of martial arts in old China, we get visions of violent convulsions of dynastic change, devastating rebellions, civil wars, and banditry. Throughout the centuries there was a need for masters who possessed highly effective martial skills for positions in the military, protection services, and law enforcement. Out of this historical reality emerged a national treasure we call taijiquan. Chen tai chi's mystique remains fundamentally a true fighting art, including bare-handed forms and applications, plus an arsenal of weapons that includes the spear, straight sword, broadsword, and halberd. Then there are the associated training methods used to master this complete system, such as qigong, push-hands, and standing post. All of these practices are infused with knowledge associated with the physical and mental aspects of the human condition. Any serious taiji practitioner or scholar should have some understanding of the Chen family roots to get a vision of the whole tree. This two-volume anthology brings much of the rich heritage conveniently together for your reading. In this first volume, prepare yourself to sit at the feet of the main representatives of the Chen Village, including Chen Xiaowang, Chen Xiaoxing, and Wang Xian. Perhaps of greater importance are the clear explanations outlining each step in the learning process toward mastering Chen-style tai chi. Chapters included here clarify what proper training entails and why much time and effort (gongfu) are necessary to gain results."
 

 

 


Chen Taijiquan 19 Form.  Instructional DVD by Sifu Ken Gullette.  NTSC format, color, 2 hours and 34 minutes.  Internal Fighting Arts, L.L.C., Newly revised and expanded, 2017.  Amazon.   English language narration with excellent audio track.  Very good video quality.  The form is demonstrated in its entirety from both front and back views.  Sifu Gullette provides detailed instructions for each movement and some coaching of a student.  His descriptions are clear, accurate, and very informative.  VSCL.  This is the instructional DVD that I study each day, and therefore, my standard or model or exemplar for this Chen 19 Form.   


Chen Taijiquan 19 Form: A Detailed Step-by-Step Reference for the Short Beginner's Form of Chen Tai Chi.  EBook by Sifu Ken Gullette.  Internal Fighting Arts, 2013, 250 pages, more than 200 photographs.  Promotional review of EBook.  "With more than 200 photographs and detailed instruction on body mechanics, this book is unlike any Taiji instructional book you've ever seen. It provides a detailed, step-by-step, frame-by-frame reference for the short beginner's form of Chen Tai Chi. A lot of books show a movement, then the next movement, but sometimes, books do not show specifically how to get from one movement to the next. In this book, Ken Gullette shows all the details. The Chen 19 Form takes about 5 minutes to perform. It was designed in 1995 by Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang, a direct descendant of Tai Chi's creator, Chen Wangting. Grandmaster Chen designed the 19 Form after being asked by students around the world for a shorter form than the 75-movement Laojia Yilu. He based the 19 Form primarily on the longer form. Ken Gullette learned the Chen 19 Form beginning in 1998 from his teachers, Jim and Angela Criscimagna of Rockford, Illinois, and from their teacher, Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang, who visited Rockford to teach Chen Taiji workshops. This is the first in a two-part series of e-books. The second volume will teach self-defense applications of the movements in the Chen 19 Form. In this book, Ken shows the movements and reminds you of what is happening inside, including the ground path, spiraling, whole-body movement, peng jin, Dan T'ien rotation, and opening/closing the kua. The book is a companion and reference for Ken's Chen 19 Form DVD, but the book was designed to stand alone as an instructional tool. Ken began studying martial arts in 1973 at the age of 20, inspired by Bruce Lee and the Kung-Fu TV show. It became a way of life. He is a tournament champion, winning trophies from 1974 to 2013, including two National Titles at the 1990 AAU Kung Fu National Championships, and numerous tournament wins for forms, weapons, and sparring. Ken began teaching in 1997 and still teaches a small group of students in the Quad Cities (Iowa and Illinois) plus his membership website has members around the world, and he teaches through DVDs and ebooks. Ken is a teacher and a student, always working to get better and passing on what he learns to those who are not as far along the path of internal kung-fu."  - Amazon  Purchase EBook from Amazon for $4.99.  VSCL. 


Chen Taijiquan 19 Short Form  A PDF file that includes detailed descriptions of each movement, 12 pages, 2011.  From Madison Chen Style Taijiquan Studio.


Chen Taijiquan, Old Frame First Form , Lao Jia Yi Lu, 74 Movements


Chen Taijiquan: The Theory and Practice of a Daoist Internal Martial Art: Volume 1, Basics and Short 18 Form.  By Thomas Hayes and Wang Hai Jun.  Mirador Pub., 2016.  480 pages.  ISBN: 978-1911473480. 


Chen Taijiquan 38 Form.  Instructional DVD from Master Ren Guangyi.  Instructional DVD, 2 Disc Set, NTSC.  120 minutes.  2007. 


Chen Taiji Self-Defense, Fighting Applications of the Chen Family Tai Chi 19 Form.  By Sifu Ken Gullette.  Kindle E Book, 2013.  202 pages. 


Chen Village.  Documentary DVD, 80 Minutes .  Featuring Chen Xiaowang and Chen Xiaoxing.  Directed by Jon Braeley.  Review


Classics of Taijiquan 

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 


Cloud Hands Website: T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Ch'i Kung   By Michael P. Garofalo.  


Cloud Hands (Taijiquan and Qigong) Website - Subject Index
  


Comparison of Movements of Chen Short 19 Form and Chen Old Frame First Form (Laojia Yilu) 


Cultivating the Civil and Mastering the Martial: The Yin and Yang of Taijiquan.  By Andrew Townsend.  CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, no publisher listed on titlepages, 2016.  No index, brief bibliography, 424 pages.  Small typefont.  This volume is a huge compendia of information, comprehensive in scope, with good explanations, observations, insights, and summaries, etc..  This thick book includes some precise and detailed movement descriptions, sound Taijiquan teaching on many topics, and more than five hundred photographs and illustrations.  A heavy reference volume for your desktop; ebook versions for your tablet or phone or Kindle.  ISBN: 978-1523258536.  VSCL.  "Andrew Townsend has been practicing martial arts for more than forty years and began practicing taijiquan in 1990.  Mr. Townsend is a certified taijiquan instructor and a senior student of Grandmaster Jesse Tsao.  He is a retired college professor and has been actively teaching taijiquan for the past ten years.  He lives and teaches in Ormond Beach, Florida." 


The Dao of Taijiquan: Way to Rejuvenation  By Jou, Tsung Hwa.   Edited by Shoshana Shapiro.  Warwick, New York, Tai Chi Foundation, 1980.  263 pages.  First Edition.  MGC.  ISBN: 0804813574.  An excellent comprehensive textbook.  A Third Edition is now available.  Master Jou was very knowledgeable about Chen Taijiquan, and recommended that you learn Chen Taijiquan first.  A significant portion of this book is about the Chen Taijiquan.  The First and Second Form movements are listed and illustrated on pp. 11-41.  Silk Reeling is covered on pp. 148-158.  This was a landmark book - the first comprehensive textbook on Taijiquan in the English language.  Master Jou was a very influential teacher and workshop organizer on the East Coast of the USA.  [Jou Tsung Hwa 1980]  


Embrace the Moon, Seattle, Kim Ivy   Interview with Kim Ivy


The Essence of TaijiquanBy David Gaffney and Davidine Siaw-Voon Sim.  CreateSpace Publishing, 2012.  Interviews, bibliography, 288 pages.  ISBN: 978-1500609238.  VSCL.  Highly informative!  Excellent information on Taijiquan training principles, methods, and progression.  Strong emphasis upon training for combat skills.  Interesting observations about everyday life in the Chen village, ancestor respect and rituals, and overcoming the repression of the Maoist Cultural Revolution. 


The Essence of T'ai Chi Ch'uan: The Literary Tradition.  Translated and edited by Benjamin Pang Jeng Lo; Martin Inn, Robert Amacker, and Susan Foe.  Berkeley, California, North Atlantic Books, 1979, 1985.  100 pages.  ISBN: 0913028630.  VSCL.    


56 Movements, Chen Taijiquan 56 Competition Form Standard


The Five Levels of Taijiquan  By Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang.  Commentary by Master Jan Silverstorff.  Translated by Christina Schulz.  Singing Dragon, 2012.  112 pages.  ISBN: 184819093X.  $26.37.  VSCL. 

 

   

    

Sifu Ken Gullette (1956-)

Instructional DVDs with Detailed Teaching of the Chen Style Taijiquan 19 Form and Chen Style Taijiquan Laojia Yilu 74 Form
Books and ebooks about Chen Style Taijiquan martial arts applications in the 19 Form
The Internal Fighting Arts Online School (2009-) of Sifu Ken Gullette.

Sifu Ken Gullette has was certified to teach Chen Taijiquan by Master Chen Xiaoxing in Chen Village, China; and he is certified as an instructor with the U.S. Chen Family Chen Jiajou Taiji Quan Federation.  Sifu Gullette has over forty years of martial arts training and experience, and has studied with such noted teachers as Chen Xiaoxing, Sin The, Karen Vaughn, Phillip Starr, Mark Wasson, Jim and Angela Criscimagna, and Chen Xiaowang.  Sifu Gullette has been teaching internal martial arts since 1997.  He and his wife, Nancy, live in Bettendorf, Iowa. 

I highly recommend Sifu Gullette as a fine Chen Style Taijiquan teacher for his excellent quality instructional DVDs and ebooks.  In 2018, I am learning the Chen Style Taijiquan 19 Form by the daily detailed study of Sifu Ken Gullette's instructional DVDs, and the books/ebooks listed below:    


Chen Taijiquan 19 Form.  Instructional DVD by Sifu Ken Gullette.  NTSC format, color, 2 hours and 34 minutes.  Internal Fighting Arts, L.L.C., Newly revised and expanded, 2017.  Amazon.   English language narration with excellent audio track.  Very good video quality.  The form is demonstrated in its entirety from both front and back views.  Sifu Gullette provides detailed instructions for each movement and some coaching of a student.  His descriptions are clear, accurate, and very informative.  VSCL.  This is the instructional DVD that I study each day, and therefore, my standard or model or exemplar for this Chen 19 Form.  


Chen Taijiquan 19 Form: A Detailed Step-by-Step Reference for the Short Beginner's Form of Chen Tai Chi.  EBook by Sifu Ken Gullette.  Internal Fighting Arts, 2013, 250 pages, more than 200 photographs.  Promotional review of EBook.  "With more than 200 photographs and detailed instruction on body mechanics, this book is unlike any Taiji instructional book you've ever seen. It provides a detailed, step-by-step, frame-by-frame reference for the short beginner's form of Chen Tai Chi. A lot of books show a movement, then the next movement, but sometimes, books do not show specifically how to get from one movement to the next. In this book, Ken Gullette shows all the details. The Chen 19 Form takes about 5 minutes to perform. It was designed in 1995 by Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang, a direct descendant of Tai Chi's creator, Chen Wangting. Grandmaster Chen designed the 19 Form after being asked by students around the world for a shorter form than the 75-movement Laojia Yilu. He based the 19 Form primarily on the longer form. Ken Gullette learned the Chen 19 Form beginning in 1998 from his teachers, Jim and Angela Criscimagna of Rockford, Illinois, and from their teacher, Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang, who visited Rockford to teach Chen Taiji workshops. This is the first in a two-part series of e-books. The second volume will teach self-defense applications of the movements in the Chen 19 Form. In this book, Ken shows the movements and reminds you of what is happening inside, including the ground path, spiraling, whole-body movement, peng jin, Dan T'ien rotation, and opening/closing the kua. The book is a companion and reference for Ken's Chen 19 Form DVD, but the book was designed to stand alone as an instructional tool. Ken began studying martial arts in 1973 at the age of 20, inspired by Bruce Lee and the Kung-Fu TV show. It became a way of life. He is a tournament champion, winning trophies from 1974 to 2013, including two National Titles at the 1990 AAU Kung Fu National Championships, and numerous tournament wins for forms, weapons, and sparring. Ken began teaching in 1997 and still teaches a small group of students in the Quad Cities (Iowa and Illinois) plus his membership website has members around the world, and he teaches through DVDs and ebooks. Ken is a teacher and a student, always working to get better and passing on what he learns to those who are not as far along the path of internal kung-fu."  - Amazon  Purchase EBook from Amazon for $4.99.  VSCL. 


Chen Taiji Self-Defense, Fighting Applications of the Chen Family Tai Chi 19 Form.  By Sifu Ken Gullette.  Kindle E Book, 2013.  202 pages. 


Silk Reeling with Sifu Ken Gullette  Instructional DVD, 2 disc set, 150 Minutes.  18 silk reeling exercises with detailed instruction in body mechanics.  Detailed coaching.  Includes some information on pole shaking.  VSCL. 


Chen Tai Chi Laojia Yilu.  By Ken Gullette.  Instructional DVD, 2 Disc Set, 5 hours and 3 minutes of Instruction, NTSC Format.  Moline, Illinois, Internal Fighting Arts, 2015.  In-depth coaching on internal body dynamics.  Internal Fighting Arts of Ken Gullette, copyright 2015.  Sifu Ken Gullette was certified in 2005 as an instructor through Grandmaster Chen Xiaoxing's school in the Chen Villiage, China.  Sifu Gullette demonstrates the complete form from both a front and back view.  Detailed and informative verbal instructions and precise physical demonstrations are provided by Sifu Gullette for each of the 75 movements in this traditional form.  A strong emphasis on internal body mechanics.  Spiraling methods are given for the arms and hands.  Martial applications are shown.  Excellent coaching by Sifu Gullette for beginners learning this form.  Instruction is done with front, side, and rear views to facilitate visual learning.  Good English language is used: direct, explicit, detailed, informative, with a calm and pleasant voice in a typical practical American style.  Very good attention to the legs: postures, movements, weighting, shifting, stepping angles, and principles.  Five hours of superior instruction for an very affordable DVD at $29.95 in 2016.  This DVD lacks a good menu system - its only drawback.  You have to jump forward section by section to get to where you want to go. Sifu Gullette teaches Chen Style Taijiquan.  VSCL.  


Chen Tai Chi Fighting Applications.  Instructional DVD by Sifu Ken Gullette.  Volume 1 Volume 2.   Volume 3.  3 DVD discs.  Moline, Illinois, Internal Fighting Arts.  Sifu Gullette explores Laojia Yilu, a 75-movement Chen Taijiquan form and the first major form in Chen Tai Chi.  In this one form, he uncovers over 400 realistic and powerful fighting techniques, and and no movements are repeated.  Sifu Gullette goes even deeper than just the fighting applications.  He explains and demonstrates the internal body mechanics that give these techniques their power.  The fighting techniques in this form involve punches, palm strikes, kicks, knee strokes, shoulder and elbow strikes, chin-na, throws and takedowns.  It's a complete fighting art in one form. These DVDs have been praised even by disciples of Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang.  Since some movements are similar to those of other tai chi styles, any tai chi student and teacher will get insights into their art by watching the principles and techniques in these DVDs."  VSCL. 


Chen Tai Chi Quan, Laojia Yilu, Old Frame, First Form, Chen Style of Taijiquan

 

 

                                       

 

 

 

Chen Taijiquan "Short" Routines (Forms): 13, 18, 19, 24, 36, 38, 56

 

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Five Levels of Skill in Chen Style Taijiquan.  By Grandmaster Chen Xiao Wang translated by Tan Lee-Peng, Ph.D.


The Hidden Song Taizu Chang Quan Roots of Chen Taiji.  By Salvatore Canzonieri.  Shaolin Kung Fu Magazine, January/February, 2007, Article #30.  Utube demonstrations of Shaolin Taizu Chang Quan:  One, Two


How many minutes will it typically take to perform the entire Chen Taijiquan, Short 19 Form? 


The Internal Athlete: An Interview with Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang.  2016. 


The Internal Fighting Arts Online School (2009-) of Sifu Ken Gullette.  Chen Style Taijiquan lessons and martial applications. 


Internal Training in Chen Taijiquan


Interview with Grandmaster Chen Xiao Wang


Lao Jia Yi Lu, Chen Style Taijiquan, Old Frame First Form , 74 Movements


List of Movements in Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang's Short 19 Form   (1 Page, PDF)   English Only.  By Mike Garofalo.


List of Movements in Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang's Short 19 Form   (1 Page, PDF)   English and Chinese.  By Mike Garofalo. 


List of Movements in Chen Taijiquan, Old Frame, First Form, Laojia Yilu   (2 pages, PDF)  English and Chinese.  By Mike Garofalo. 


Magic Pearl Qigong: A Tai Chi Medicine Ball Exercise Routine and Meditation Technique 


Medical Benefits of Taijiquan Practice 


Notes on Learning Chen Style Taijiquan - A Beginner's Notebook by Mike Garofalo 


Old Frame, First Form, Laojia Yilu, Chen Style Taijiquan, 74 Movements  


The Origins of Tai Chi: The Chen Camp   Literati Tradition, Xiansheng Bing F. YeYoung


Plumb Publications: Chen Taijiquan 


Power and Serenity.  By Master Ren Guang Yi.  Instructional DVD in NTSC format.  The Short 19 Form from Grand Master Chen Xiao-Wang, and Silk Reeling exercises from Grand Master Chen Xiao Wang.  70 minutes.  2010.  VSCL. 


Qi Cultivation and the Secrets of Manipulating Energy: Chen Style Tai Chi Progressive Silk Reeling, Series I.  Instructional DVD by Jose Figueroa, 91 Minutes.  Instructional DVD in NTSC format.  Dragon Door Publications, 2008.  Shifu Figueroa also offers two other instructional DVDs for Chen Taijiquan students: The Deeper Secrets of Moving with Strength and Energy, Fa Jin and the Secrets of Explosive Power.  Jose Figueroa studied with Master Ren Guang Yi and Grand Master Chen Xiao Wang.  Also available from Amazon


Quotations about Chen Style Taijiquan


Relaxation - Song 


Ripening Peaches:  Daoist Studies and Practices.  Taoist scriptures, bibliography, Quanzhen Daoism, Neidan, gardening, tea, history, qigong/daoyin, readings, etc. 


Resources for the Study of Chen Style Taijiquan


Saber (Dan Dao), Broadsword, Saber Weapon, Chen Style Taijiquan 


The Sage's Way: Teachings and Commentaries.  By Ray Grigg.  Trafford Pub., 2004.  172 pages.  ISBN: 978-1412021685.


Seattle School of Chen Taijiquan



Short Forms of Chen Style Taijiquan

18 Movements, Created by Grandmaster Chen Zhenglei, 2001

19 Movements, Created by Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang, 1995

24 Movements, Hun Yuan Chen Taijiquan 24 Form, Created by Grandmaster Feng Shi Qiang

36 Movements, Created By Professor Professor Kan Gui Xiang

38 Movements, Created by Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang 

56 Movements, Competition Form

74 Movements, Long Form, Old Frame, First Form (Laijia Yilu)  Traditional Chen Family Form from 1800

 

Silk Reeling, Chan Ssu Gong:  Links, bibliography, quotes, notes.  Chan Si Gong (Reeling Silk Training): Bibliography, Links, Resources.  Internal Training Exercises Using Spiraling, Coiling, Twining, Winding, Reeling, or Circling Methods.  Chen Taijiquan Qigong, Internal Training Exercises. 


Silk Reeling with Sifu Ken Gullette  Instructional DVD, 2 disc set, 150 Minutes.  18 silk reeling exercises with detailed instruction in body mechanics.  Detailed coaching.  Includes some information on pole shaking.  VSCL. 


Standing Meditation, Standing Like a Tree, Post Standing, Zhan Zhuang  


Styles of Chinese Martial Arts, Martial Arts World


Subject Index to the Cloud Hands (Taijiquan and Qigong) Website 


Sword (Jian), Double Edged Straight Sword, Chen Style Taijiquan


Suggestions for Beginning Your Study of Chen Taijiquan 


Tai Chi - Chen Style 36 Forms.  By Dr. Paul Lam.  Instructional DVD, NTSC Format.  Tai Chi Productions, 1993.  ISBN: 978-0975200377.  VSCL. 


Tai Chi for Health.  By Grandmaster Chen Zhenglei and Master Liming Yue.  Chen Style Tai Chi Centre, Manchester, U. K, 2005.  ISBN: 194719112.  208 pages.  Color photographs.  "By Chen Zhenglei and his student, Liming Yue. In English. Includes principles of Tai Chi for Health, foundation training exercises, Taji skills for preserving energy, illustrations of the 18 forms, Comments from Westerners about Tai Chi plus interviews with Tai Chi practitioners. Many photos. Paperback. 7 1/4 X 10 1/.4. #9.99."  -  Wayfarer Publications.   AmazonTai Chi Centre  "Tai Chi for Health was officially released at the International Tai Chi Festival and the third International Exchange Competition opening ceremony in China in August 2005. This full color book focuses on the health benefits of Tai Chi, concentrating on the official Chen Style 18 Short Form, Silk Reeling Energy and Qigong exercises. The book contains detailed illustrated instructions and in-depth discussion of the theories behind the practice. The text offers an unprecedented insight into the techniques and theory of Chen Style Tai Chi. The authors bring together their vast knowledge, teaching experience and cultural understanding to create a work that is accessible to western students whilst keeping all the important detail often lost in translations. The book has been written over a two and a half year period by Grandmaster Chen Zhenglei and Master Liming Yue with the assistance of several of Master Liming Yue's senior students. Grandmaster Chen Zhenglei is the 11th Generation head of the Chen Style Tai Chi and 19th generation of the Chen family.  Master Liming Yue is one of Europe's foremost Tai Chi masters and holds a seventh Duan Wei officially issued by the Chinese Wu Shu Association China."  -  Tai Chi Center, U.K.   The Tai Chi Centre offers two free downloadable sections of this book.  Chen Style Taijiquan Short 18 Form.  Performance by Master Chen Zhenglei.  UTube, color, 3:38 Minutes, 2007.  VSCL. 


Tai Chi--The Perfect Exercise: Finding Health, Happiness, Balance, and Strength  By Arthur Rosenfeld.  Da Capo Lifelong Books, 2013.  ISBN: 978-0738216607.  VSCL. 


The Taijiquan Classics: An Annotated Translation.  Translated by Barbara Davis.  Commentary by Chen, Wei-ming.  San Francisco, North Atlantic Books, 2004.  200 pages.  ISBN: 1556434316.  VSCL. 


Taijiquan: Cultivating Inner Strength  By C. P. Ong.  Bagua Press, 2013.  366 pages.  ISBN: 978-0615874074.  VSCL.  "This book diverges from traditional exposition on Taijiquan (Tai Chi Chuan) as it engages rather than shuns the role of muscles in elucidating the cryptic practice dictum of using yi (mind) and not li (muscle force). It centers on the core principle of Taiji balancethe balance of yin and yang, but presents the metaphysics of balance the way the body comprehends it, developmentally, through practice in the musculo-skeletal framework. In the process, the fog of mystique lifts, and the many abstruse concepts of Taijiquan become clear. Taijiquan training is physical at the initial phase, but the slow-motion exercise nurtures a meditative discipline of the mind. As it progresses, the soft methodology grows into one of building qi-energy, and then the practice becomes more internalized. The process fortifies the body with qi and cultivates a holistic balance of the organ systems. The book explains how the training methodology, in pursuing Taiji balance, leads to the development of a highly refined strength called neijin (inner strength). By incorporating the training of silk-reeling energy in Taiji balance, the practitioner develops the coiling power (chanrao jin) that underlies the magic of Taijiquan kungfu."  Dr. Ong has a Ph.D. in mathematics from U.C. Berkeley.  C.P. Ong is a 20th generation Chen Family Taijiquan disciple of both Chen Xiaowang and Chen Zhenglei. He has traveled with them, as well as with Zhu Tiancai, for a few years in their U.S. workshop tours.

 

 

                                    

 

 

Taijiquan: The Art of Nurturing, The Science of Power  By Yang Yang with Scott A. Grubish.  Champaign, Illinois, Zhenwu Publications, Center for Taiji Studies, 2005.  Bibliography, index, notes, glossary, 219 pages.  ISBN: 0974099007.  Emphasis upon the theory and methods of Taijiquan, exercise science, and health benefits.  VSCL. 


Talking Chen Tajiquan with David Gaffney  Blog. 


Taoism and the Tao Te Ching


Taoism and the Philosophy of Tai Chi Chuan  


Training Success Characteristics


Tutorial on the Chen 19 Form by Grandmaster Chen Xiao Wang.  UTube, 65 minutes, color.  Chinese music plays in the background throughout.  Chinese voice narration with English language subtitles.  Poor visual video quality - a bootleg copy of his instructional DVD. 


25 Secrets of Tai Chi: Chen Family Taijiquan 25 Key Disciplines.  By Bosco Seungchui Baek.  Create Space Independent Pub. Platform, 2017.  140 pages.  ISBN: 978-1548554552.


Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Vancouver, Washington.  Instructor: Michael P. Garofalo, M.S. 


VSCL =  Valley Spirit Center Library, Red Bluff, California 
 

Yang Style of Taijiquan   Bibliography, links, resources, quotes, notes. 


Yang Style Taijiquan, Standard 24 Movement Short Form


Zhan Zhuang, Standing Like a Tree, Post Standing, Standing Meditation  

 

 

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The Five Levels of Taijiquan  By Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang.  Commentary by Master Jan Silverstorff. 

Chen: Living Taijiquan in the Classical Style.  By Master Jan Silberstorff.  2009

Chen T'ai Chi, Volume 1: Traditional Instructions from the Chen Village.  2015

 

 

 

 

 

Videos


Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang's Chen Taijiquan 19 Form, 1995


Chen Taijiquan 19 Movements Routine Performances on UTube

 

There are many demonstrations of this Chen 19 Form on UTube.   Unfortunately, all performances by Grandmaster Chen Xiao Wang have very poor quality video.
However, there are some good video quality performances by Master Ren GuangYi, Sifu Seiji Hori, Sifu Oscar M. Galeano, and others

The time required to do a complete performance of this form ranges from 3:20 to 4:00 minutes, judging by these UTube performances. 

 

 

Sifu Oscar Muňoz Galeano performing the Chen Taijiquan 19 Form, 3:51 Minutes, Front View

 

 

Master Ren GuangYi performing the Chen Taijiquan 19 Form, 3:41 Minutes, Front View

 

 

Sifu Chen Ziaoxing performing the Chen Taijiquan 19 Form, 3:51 Minutes, Front View

 

 

Classroom Group performing the Chen Taijiquan 19 Form, 2:52 Minutes, Side View

 

 

Young Man at tournament performing the Chen Taijiquan 19 Form, 3:39 Minutes, Front View

 

 

Other Performances of the Chen Taijiquan 19 Movements Routine on UTube

 

 

Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang's Performances of Taijiquan on UTube

 

Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang performing the Chen Taijiquan 19 Form, 3:38 Minutes, Front View, Rather Unfocused

 

 

Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang performing Chen Taijiquan in 2015 at age 70, 5:07 Minutes, Front View

 

 

Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang Performing the Chen Taijiquan Old Frame, First Form, Lao Jia Yilu, 20:54 Minutes

 

Other Performances of Taijiquan on UTube by Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang

 

 

 

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Quotations

Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang's Chen Taijiquan 19 Form, 1995

 

 

"The Chen 19 Form was created by Grandmaster Chen Xiao Wang in 1995 in response to demand from students around the world for a short routine suitable for beginners. The form is composed of 19 movements (and so its name) , divided into four sections. The form is easy for novice to learn, yet offers the experienced practitioner room to express and develop the basic principles, energies and techniques of the style. The form is a combination of postures from the three traditional Chen style taijiquan routines: Lao Jia (Old Frame), Xin Jia (New Frame), and the Xiao Jia (Small Frame). It contains several postures from the Xin Jia style, including Shang Bu Xie Xing, Dao Juan Hong, and Yeh Ma Fen Zhong. These postures are fairly simple, and avoid the complex coils that are the signature of the style. Also included are postures from the Xiao Jia style, including Shuang Tui Shou, Shan Tong Bei, and Liu Feng Si Bi. The remainder of the form (about 2/3) is from the Lao Jia Yi Lu routine."
Madison Chen Style Taijiquan Studio
 

 

"This form was developed by Chen Xiao Wang, 19th generation grandmaster of Chen Style Taijiquan. It serves as a good introduction to important moves in the primary Chen form, lao jia yi lu. It is an easy form to begin utilizing Chen Xiao Wang's reeling silk principles. It is also very well balanced with right-side/left side moves. Postures of this form are derived from Chen first set forms as listed below:  New Frame First set (Xin Jia Yi Lu): Step up walk obliquely (Shang bu xie xing), Whirling upper arms (Dao juan hong), Part wild horses mane (Yeh ma fen zhong).  Small Frame First set (Xiao Jia Yi Lu): Push with both hands (Shuang tui shou), Flashing the back (Shan tong bei), and Six sealing four closing (Liu feng si bi).  Old Frame First Set (Lao Jia Yi Lu) Remainder of moves.  The form is composed of four sections that run back and forth on a straight line, with each section primarily running in one direction. Assuming that we start facing North,
1st section East to West; 2nd section West to East; 3rd section East to West; 4th section West to East."
Rochester Chen Style Tai Chi Chuan

 

 

"The fundamental principles for Chen Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan are summarized as follows:

Keeping the head upright (虚领顶劲, xū ling ding jin)

Keeping the body straight (立身中正, lshēn zhōngzhng)

Drop the shoulders and sink the elbow (松肩沉肘, sōng jiān chn zhou)

The chest curve inwards and the waist pressed forward.(含胸塌腰, hn xiōng tā yāo)

Sink the energy to the dantian (心气下降, xīn q xi jing)

Breathe naturally (呼吸自然, hū xī z rn)

Relax the hips and keep the knees bent (松胯屈膝 ,sōng ku qū xī)

The crotch is arch shaped (裆劲开圆, dāng jn kāi yun)

Keep the mind pure and clear (虚实分明, xū sh fēn mng)

The top and bottom work together (上下相随. shng xi xiāng su)

Adjust hardness and softness (刚柔相济, gāng ru xiāng j)

Alternate fast and slow (快慢相间, (kui mn xiāng jin)

The external shape is curved (外形走弧线, wi xng zou h xin)

The internal energy travels a spiral path (内劲走螺旋, ni jn zou lu xun)

The body leads the hand (以身领手, yi shēn ling shou)

The waist is an axis (以腰为轴, yi yāo wi zhu)

Chen Style T'ai Chi Ch'uan, Wikipedia

 

 

A Few Highlights of Chen Taijiquan History

"According to the Li Family Genealogy, the early patriarchs of Li, Chen (Chen Bu), and three other families became sworn brothers on their migration from Shanxi in the fourteenth century. This event took place in the Qianzai Temple of Tang Village in Boai County, which is about 30 miles away from the present Chen Village. By the ninth generation, the Li patriarchs Zhong and Xin, and their inter-marriage cousin Chen Wangting again swore themselves to be brothers like their forefathers, and took the abbot Bogong Wudao as their master at the Taiji Gate of Qianzai Temple. The contents of the papers day that Chen and the Li brothers created taiji yangshen gong, or "the art of Taiji Cultivating Life," and practiced and transmitted wuji yangshen gong, or "the art of Wuji Cultivating Life," shisanshi tongbei gong , or "the Thirteen Postures Boxing." "The art of Wuji Cultivating Life" and "the Thirteen Postures Boxing" had been created by the Qianzai Temple priest Shi Li (614-741), or Li Daozi, according to stone tablets at the temple, who well studied the Three Teachings, Qianjin yifang: "Revised Prescriptions Worth a Thousand Pieces of Gold;" daoyin: "guiding and pulling"; and tunai: "expelling the old breath and drawing the new." It is said that various martial art postures (from nearby Shaolin and other sources, such as the Chang Nai Chous Nei Jia Quan, from the neighboring Wen county) were combined with classic Chinese internal health theories of passages of blood, air flow, and energy. This new art eventually became known as Chen family boxing. By the 1700's, Chen Wang Ting's style had developed into the Five Routines of Pao Chuoi and Hong Quan, a 32- and a 108-posture Tai Ji form, and one Duan Da (short strike) form. Over time many of these forms were said to have been lost. By the end of the century, the art had been passed to Chen Chang Xing, 14 th generation, who united and simplified the various routines. It is said by some that Chen Chang Xing re-introduced Nei Jia Quan into his Chen family art via teachings from Wang Zong Yue and Jian Fa. According to an interview (by Yuan Quan Fu) with Li Libing, the present eighteenth generation of Li family, Wang Zong Yue came from Shanxi, and lived in the Tang village as a schoolteacher for five or six years. There, Wang studied martial arts with Li Helin, who was born in 1721, the twelfth generation of the Li Family. (Chen Chang Xing was also the teacher of Yang Lu-chan, originator of Yang Tai Ji Quan. What is very interesting is that the Chen linage, Yang Lu Chan, and Wu Yu Xiang and his brothers, ALL had learned Shaolin Hong Quan in their youth. Many of the ideas and movements seen in Yang style, but not obvious in Chen style, can be found in Hong Quan forms, especially the Xiao Hong Quan form. The concept and movements of Tai Ji Quans Push Hands are also found in the Step Forward Push Palms postures in Xiao Hong Quan, along with the Fair Lady Works at Shuttles movement.)"
-   The Hidden Song Taizu Chang Quan Roots of Chen Taiji.  By Salvatore Canzonieri.  Shaolin Kung Fu Magazine, January/February, 2007, Article #30. 

The Origins of Tai Chi: The Chen Camp   Literati Tradition, Xiansheng Bing F. YeYoung 

 

Chen Wangting, 1600-1680, 9th Generation in Chen Village, Creator of the original Chen Taijiquan corpus of Seven Routines.
He is considered the founder of Chen Style Taijiquan. 

               
                                                    
                                                           Chen Wangting (1600-1680)

 

Chen Changxing, 1771-1853, 陳長興, 14th Generation in Chen Village, utilized the hand forms of the original Seven Routines of Chen Wangting's Taijiquan and consolidated and rearranged them into the Chen Taijiquan Old Frame (Laojia) First Form (Yi Lu) and Second Form (Er Lu). 



Chen Changxing (1771-1853)

 

 

 

                                                     

Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang (1945-)

 

 

 

What characteristics do we need to make a success of our Taijiquan training?

By Chen Ziqiang.

Thanks to Randy Chakerian from Corvallis, Oregon, for sending me (6/18/2014) information about this short article by Chen Ziqiang.  "The following article by Chen Ziqiang was translated by Davidine Sim for the Chenjiagou Taijiquan GB website, and after reading it I (David Gaffney) thought that some of you guys would enjoy it: 


 
What you need to know for your Taijiquan practice? 

 
1.Respect your teacher.  Place strict demand on yourself. Not respecting your teacher may not present a problem on the surface, but in actual fact you have not realised the true essence of martial arts principle.  If the character is not upright, attempts to take short cuts, harbouring unnatural thoughts - will inevitably not attain the true essence of Taijiquan's philosophy and martial art.

 
2Do not be arrogant and egotistical. It is easy to attract trouble and disputes when a person is arrogant and egotistical.  Do not be arrogant with your skill, and do not be conceited in your speech.  Be calm  and harmonious in your dealings. One who is arrogant and conceited is bound to run aground in mid-course.

 
3. Do not be prideful and self-satisfied when learning Taijiquan, as "an army puffed up with pride is bound to lose".   The proverb says: "Beyond the heaven there's another heaven; besides this man there's another man".   A humble man who is worthy of being taught, the venerable elder empties his treasure trove to transmit.

 
4.When you learn Taijiquan you should learn with concentrated attention.  Every posture must be practised and studied repeatedly.   Thinking must be natural and rational. Movements must be continuous and unbroken. If they are not continuous the energy flow will not be smooth and in order, and it would be impossible to utilise your primary dantian energy at will.

 
5. You must understand the way and principle of Taijiquan.  If you don't understand the way, you will not understand how to learn.  Ultimately you will not be able to experience the wondrous essence of the art.

 
6. You must be conscientious during practice.  Understand the changes within movements.   Train with method; the method must be compatible with your body and understanding.  Train systematically; work with your concept, in order to enable your physical movements to change and alter to fit in and harmonise with your intellectual understanding.  From the first posture to the last, if you are familiar and are able to remember the principle of every direction, angle, posture and its transition, only then can you claim to have grasped a form (taolu).  This is known as "Zhao Shu" or "Familiarity with the Form".

 
7. During practice pay attention to the functions of the movements.  Every movement has a different function but at the same time movements are mutually changeable, and supplement and balance each other.   It can therefore be said that the function of every movement in a form from the beginning to the end is elastic,  changeable  and linked.  Only in this way the power of every movement is expressed perfectly in the appropriate place.   This is known as "Dong Jin" or "Understanding Energy".

 
8. There must be intention during practice.  Because every move expresses its function and thought process.  A common saying states: "During training act as if there's an opponent.  In combat act as if there's no opponent".   When you reach a stage where you don't need to pause to ponder either in practice or in actual usage, when you're able to spontaneously use your every move and posture to deal with external changes.  This is the instinctive manifestation of "xin" and "yi" (mind and intent).  It is known as "Shen Ming" or "Divine Realisation".

 
9. Fear neither hardship nor fatigue; make unremitting efforts; in order to reach your full potential.  You must have patience, perseverance, and a calm harmonious heart in order to arrive at the final level of "Divine Realisation".

Chen Ziqiang, "What characteristics do we need to make a success of our Taijiquan training?"

 

"In order to learn Taiji well, the first requirement must be diligence and perseverance.  Taiji classics state: "Without perseverance there can be no gain" and "Learning Taiji is like rowing a boat against the flow of water; if you do not go forward, you will drift back."  In order to glimpse the full wonder of Taiji and to attain a high level of skill, one must possess a will to carry on despite hardships, setbacks, frustration and boredom.  From the beginning, students must be willing to commit themselves to a long-term goal and be patient during the process of achieving that goal.  The process of learning takes time, and the necessary length of time must be allowed to understand the content of the teaching.  One will not succeed if focus is only on the final product."
-  Sim and Gaffney, Chen Style Taijiquan: The Source of Taiji Boxing, 2002, p. 212

 

 

 

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New Additions

Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang's Chen Taijiquan 19 Form, 1995

 

 

 

 Chen Taijiquan "Short" Routines (Forms): 13, 18, 19, 24, 36, 38, 56

 

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Chen Taijiquan, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California
 

Bibliography

Links Chen Blog

Short 18 Form

Old Frame, First Form Old Frame Second Form

Sword

Staff Saber

Spear

Pole Ruler

Standing

Silk Reeling Ball

Qigong

Internal Training Relaxation

Cloud Hands Blog

Cloud Hands Website Cloud Hands Index

Yang Style Taiji

Green Way Research Valley Spirit Center

Mike's Notebook

Chen Taiji Quotations Home

 

 

 

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Other

 

 

 

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Learning the Chen Taijiquan 19 Form

 

Chen Style Taijiquan
Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang's "Short" 19 Movements Tai Chi Hand Form, 1995


Description, Notes, Comments, Instructions

 

This hypertext notebook is where I include some of my observations, comments, research findings, tools, reminders, thoughts and experiences while learning to perform this Chen Style Taijiquan 19 Form, developed in 1995 by Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang.  

My main method and tool for learning the Chen Style Taijiquan 19 Form is the daily careful study of the instructional DVD featuring instruction by Sifu Ken Gullette in the Chen Taiji 19 Form, and reading the books and ebooks authored by Sifu Ken Gullette.  I study, memorize, and then practice. 

I also view other performances of the Chen Taiji 19 Form on UTube, and other DVDs.  I am also learning about Chen Style Taijiquan in general (19 and 74 Forms) from the books and instructional DVDs listed in this hypertext notebook. 

I began learning this Chen Style Taijiquan 19 Form routine from Sifu David Fetyko in Vancouver, Washington, in November of 2017.  In 2018, I only take a 45 minute private lesson twice each month with Sifu Fetyko on the performance of this Chen Taiji 19 Form. 

 

I will frequently give directional information for the postures and movement sequences, because this information is useful to me.  When learning, it benefits me and helps me to remember by making notes and doing research.  There is usually lots to remember when doing Taijiquan properly. 

I like to collect together my thoughts about the possible meanings of the movement names, historical musings, interesting quotes, lore, and interrelations with ideas from other Taijiquan styles.  These hypertext notebooks of mine become a hodgepodge of observations, research notes, relevant findings. 

This webpage is an ongoing project, and will not be a finished product in 2018. 

I welcome comments, suggestions, ideas, constructive criticism, and feedback from the readers of this webpage.

I have been practicing Taijiquan and Qigong since 1986, teaching Yang Style Taijiquan and Qigong since 2000, teaching part-time in elementary schools (1999-2016), and teaching Yoga since 2002.  However, I retired from my employment as a fitness instructor, teacher, educator, and manager in the summer of 2016, at the age of 70.  I am now a student, hoping to regain my health and fitness, and I hope my notebook might be of some value to beginning Taijiquan students. 

Practice and study, practice and study, practice and study!  Enjoy yourself, play every day. 

 

Directional Nomenclature

Chen Style Taijiquan

 

 

 

List of 19 Movements

 

Chen Style Taijiquan
Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang's Short 19 Movements Chen Taijiquan Form, 1995

 

 

List of Movements in Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang's Short 19 Form  (1 Page, PDF)  English Only 

List of Movements in Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang's Short 19 Form  (1Page, PDF)  English and Chinese  

List of Movements in Chen Taijiquan, Old Frame, First Form, Laojia Yilu   (2 pages, PDF)  English and Chinese 

Comparison of Chen 18 Taijiquan Form with the Chen Taijiquan Old Frame First Form Laojia Yilu.

Madison Tai Chi List of Chen Taiji 19

Rochester Chen Style Taijiquan, List of Chen Taiji 19

 

 

Chen Taijiquan 19 Form  (Shi Jiu Shi 十九式)

 

 


 
Begin Facing North

 

First Section 

1.  Preparatory Stance (Yu Bei Shi)
     Preparing for Taijiquan (Taiji Qi Shi), Starting Form (Qi Shi), Beginning of Tai Chi 
     Wuji Then Taiji: Waiting at the Temple Door

2.  Buddha's Warrior Attendant Steps Forward from the Temple  (Jin Gang Chu Miao)
     The Defenders of the Buddha Dharma Leave the Temple

3.  Lazily Tie Coat  (Lan Zha Yi)  
     Holding the Coat at the Waist  
     They Gather Their Belongings  

4.  Step Up and Walk Obliquely, Step Forward with Diagonal Parry, Single Whip   (Shang Bu Xie Xing)   Move West
     Stepping From Side to Side, Agile, Loose, Circling, Pointing

5.  Step Forward Three Steps   (Shang San Bu)   Move West  
6.  Cover Hand Punch, Left; Hidden Punch with Left Fist   (Zou Yan Shou Hong Quan)   Face SW8.    
7.  Double Pushing Hands; Double Push Palms   (Shuang Tui Chou)   Face NW10  

Second Section 
8.  Whirling Upper Arms; Stepping Backward with Whirling Arms   (Dao Juan Gong)  Move to East 3.     
9.  Flashing the Back; Flash Turn to the Back   (Shan Tong Bei) 
10.  Cover Hand Punch, Right; Hidden Punch with Right Fist   (You Yan Shou Gong Quan)  Face SE5.  
11.  Six Sealings, Four Closing   (Liu Feng Si Bi) 

Third Section  (Move to West)
12.  Cloud Hands; Moving Hands   (Yun Shou) 
13.  High Pat on the Horse; Patting High on a Horse   (Gao Tan Ma) 
14.  Right Heel Kick   (You Deng Yi Gen) 
15.  Left Heel Kick   (Zou Deng Yi Gen) 

Fourth Section  (West to East)
16.  Parting the Wild Horse's Mane   (Ye Ma Fen Zong) 
17.  Jade Maiden Works Shuttles   (Yu Nu Chuan Suo) 
18.  Hammer Fist, Buddha's Warrior Attendant Pounds Mortar   (Jin Gang Dao Zhui) 
19.  Close the Form [Face North]   (Shou Shi) 

 

    

 

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1.  Preparatory Stance (Yu Bei Shi)     预 备 式
    
Wuji Then Taiji 

 

The first Posture or movement sequence is called "Preparatory Stances" (Yu Bei Shi), o r Preparing for Taijiquan" (Taiji Qi Shi).  This movement consists of quiet standing for awhile, then stepping left into a shoulder width stance, then raising and lowering both hands.  The movement is found in all the Taijiquan forms I am familiar with (Yang, Sun, and Chen).  This phase of quiet preparation and beginning is called "Beginning of Tai-Chi" (Jou 1980), "Preparation Form" (Sim & Gaffney 2002), "Beginning of Taiji" (Chen Zenglei 2005), "Ultimate Infinite Stance" (Wong 1996), "Preparatory Stance" (Yu Bei Shi) by Chen Xiaowang, "Raise Hands and Lower Hands" (Yang Taijiquan), "Preparation", or "Stand at Ease."

"Wuji Then Taiji", Stillness Then Flowing, Yin Then Yang, Breathing In Then Breathing Out, Raising Arms Then Lowering Arms, Earth and Heaven Meeting in a Person, Stopping Then Starting.  Wuji Then Taiji: Waiting at the Temple Door

 

1.  Description of Movements in Posture 1:
     Preparatory Stance, Beginning of Tai Chi, Wuji Then Taiji: Waiting at the Temple Door

 

 

For directional reference purposes, I will assume that the Taijiquan performer will begin facing North (N 12), and that she/he will be looking towards and facing the 12 o'clock position (N 12) in the directional scheme that I will use in when describing movements in this document. 

 

There are two stances in the first Posture movement: Standing tall with feet together, and standing tall in a shoulder width stance. 

Stand with feet together (1a).  Relax.  Shoulders Down.  Head lifted and lively.  Chin up.  Don't lean.  Face towards N12.  
Hands are resting along the sides of the hips, arms hanging loosely, both hands gently touching your pants. 
Look forward, keep wide angle of vision, relaxed gaze.
The mind should settle down, reduce thinking, reduce remembering, and reduce daydreaming.
Breathe softly, gently, fully, comfortably, without straining. 
You are Preparing Yourself for doing good Taijiquan. 

When you are ready, slowly sink more weight into the right leg. 
Then gently lift the left foot, circle in a forward arc to the left, touch the left toe then the left heel, and settle downward into a comfortable shoulder width stance.  (1b)
Knees are slightly bent, don't tense thighs, shoulders are relaxed, chin is tucked, posture is upright. 
Stay erect, stand upright, don't lean, head up, poised, calm, in control.  (1b)  Face N12.   

Slowly, gently, begin to raise both arms upward, palms down, (1c), lift both arms in a forward arc until arms are at shoulder height (1d).  Inhaling.
Draw the hands in towards the chest and then downward until both hands are about waist height, (1e), palms pressing down.  Exhaling. 
Imagine both hands pressing down onto the top of a table. 
Stay with an upright posture, don't lean, don't tilt the head.  Don't rush, move slowly.  (1e)

 

 

1. Comments About the Movements in Posture 1:
The Beginning Posture of Taiji (Taiji Qi Shi), Preparatory Stance, Beginning of Tai Chi
Wuji Then Taiji: Waiting at the Temple Door

 

At the beginning of the "Beginning Posture of Taiji", your very first posture, Stand tall and relaxed.  You are a martial artist.  This shows respect to yourself and others.  It provides a quiet moment for doing nothing, wu wei, repeating a mantra, motto or poem, saying a prayer, contemplating, building up your self-confidence, practicing the Four Foundations of Mindfulness, or feeling your enthusiasm for training in Tai Chi Chuan.  A moment of silence, everyone be quiet.  This standing posture, standing post, is commonly used in Qigong and Yoga.  In my yoga class, we have two versions:  Samasthiti (heels together, hands at side of hips [1a]  and Tadasana (heels touching or feet no more than 8 inches apart, hands out fingers open, palm forward.  These are a couple of basic standing meditation postures [1a or 1b] used to settle the mind, calm the body, unwind before winding, awaken the Dan Tien and inner body, get in the proper mood for the upcoming Taijiquan activity, opening up to our kinesthic sensorium and the flowing ingress from our five senses, staying still as a discipline of the mind-body, using another tool in the technology of enriching and nourishing our pleasures and happiness, etc. 

Some men and women stand for up to 30 minutes or longer in Standing Post [Figure 1a or Figure 1b or Figure 1e].  Step 1, Beginning-Preparing, is all the Qigong they do.  They just stand quietly and don't move very much.  Yi Quan, Mind Boxing.  They don't do Steps 2 to 18 of this Taiji form.  Just Stand:  Iconoclasts, Unificationists, Returning to the One, Forgetting ...  Wu Ji ... Emptiness, Nirvana.  Oftentimes, I am an antsy and impatient person; so I just move on to Steps 2 to 19, and do Taiji Quan, Grand Ultimate Boxing. 

Figure 1b is a narrow Horse Stance, Ma Bu.  It is a narrow horse stance with your feet separated about or less than your shoulders width apart, toes facing forward towards N12, knees only slightly bent, hands at sides of hips.  Yang Taiji players take a comfortable easy tall stance in 1b.  Some Chen Taiji players step out to much wider and lower Horse Stance postures, knees lower, groin area tucked, feet pointing outward, giving more room for waist-hips-groin-legs-feet silk-reeling skills and connected strength movements.  Figure 3e shows this lower squatting wide Horse Stance posture.  Squatting is an essential strength building exercise, benefiting the entire body.  All bodybuilders and fitness enthusiasts do squatting exercises. 

Figure 1e shows the person in a narrow Horse Stance bending his knees more, settling lower, thrusting his hips back and engaging the Kwa (groin, anterior musculature in the pelvis), looking forward, with his hands lowered from [1d] to about Dan Tien level (abdominal area around your navel, intestines, kidneys) [1e].  Again ... squatting, lowering, gently bending the knees [1e]. 

Taiji likes to yin-yang between rising and lowering, up and down, forward and back, pushing and pulling, coiling and uncoiling, spiraling out and spiraling in, rotating clockwise and rotating counter-clockwise, moving left and moving right, using inner and using outer, balance on right leg and balance on left leg, extending muscles and flexing muscles, etc.  Good Taiji provides for exercising the legs and hips (muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, skin) and packing up energy, reenergizing and powering up the body.  I sometimes refer to doing "Thigh Chi" rather than "Tai Chi" to emphasize leg movements, using the power of the legs and hips to express strength and force, grounding and rooting, and strengthening and conditioning the legs and waist for more successful Taijiquan practice.   

Martial Applications of Beginning Posture of Taiji, UTube, 2:02 minutes, Part 1.  Part 2, 1:21.

The demeanor of body and mind is relaxed (Sung), alert, calm, without holding tension in the body, ready to respond, dignified, open and free.  Taijiquan encourages you to calm and quiet the mind, reduce thinking, be fully present here and now, reflect the Other clearly in the clear calm lake of diminished ego.  Standing meditation is a cornerstone of Taijiquan practices, influenced by Taoist and Buddhist practices.  In Hatha Yoga, just standing is called the "Mountain Pose" (Tadasana). 

 

 

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2.   Buddha's Warrior Attendant Steps Forward from the Temple
      (Jin Gang Chu Miao)

            The Defenders of the Buddha Dharma Leave the Temple

 

The Buddha's Guard Leaves the Temple, The Buddha's Defenders Leave the Temple
Buddha's Warrior Attendant Pounds Mortar   [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005]   
Pounding the Mortar (Jin Gang Dao Dui)   [Chen Zhenglei 2003]
Diamond King Pounds Mortar  (Jin Gang Dao Dui)  [Mark Chen]
King-Kong Nailed Fist  [Jou Tsung Hwa] 
Buddha's Warrior Attendant Pounds Mortar (Jin Gang Dao Dui)  [Sim & Gaffney] 
Buddha's Warrior Attendant Pounds with Pestle  (Jin-gang Dao Dui)  [Chen Xin 1932, 2007]
Buddha's Warrior Attendant Pounds Mortar  [Zhaohua]
Hammer Fist  [Sifu Fetyko]
金刚捣碓  :  Jin Gang Dao Dui
Scoop Moon from Ocean Bottom (Hai di lao yue), Grasp Hammer (ba chui), Shaolin Tai Tzu Chang Quan Yi Lu, from military Hong Quan, circa 970 CE. 
 

 

2.  Description of Movements in Movement Sequence (Postures, Forms) #2:

The Buddha's Warrior Attendant Steps Forward from the Temple
The Defenders of the Buddha Dharma Leave the Temple

 

 

 

 

2a.  Starting from (2a), both hands move upwards in a arc to the left side towards W9.  Left hand turns, palm faces out, pushing away, rising to about shoulder height (2b) .  The right hand pushes or grabs, palm faces out. [Possible martial application: Two hands attack opponent's elbow joint; lower right hand grabs opponents forearm and pulls in, and upper left palm pushes out against opponents elbow.]  Both arms come up to about chest height (2b). 
Weight shifts more into left leg.  Don't lean.
Slowly pivot on the right heel, and turn the right toe to face E3.  The hands turn counter-clockwise, right hand is lower than the left.  Both arms move horizontally to the right side, towards E3, at about chest height. 

The bodyweight gradually sinks into the right leg as you lift your left knee above and close to the right knee. 
 

 

2.  Comments About the Movements in Posture 2: The Buddha's Guard Leaves the Temple 

 

Martial Applications of Buddha's Warrior Attendant Pounds Mortar, UTube, 1:49 minutes.

 

 

The Buddha's Warriors, Temple Guards, Bodyguards on Staff, Safety and Security Personnel, Temple Staff and Helpers  


Keep in mind that the famous Shaolin Buddhist Temple is just a two days walk from the Chen Village in China.  "The bus ride from Chen Village to Luoyang, and from Luoyang to the Shaolin Temple used to take the best part of 6 hours. Going by taxi shaves a bit of time off this. The new bridge over the Yellow River cuts the time in half."

     "At the entrance to many Chinese Buddhist Temples, or on the four cardinal directions of the Buddhist Temple, are sculptures of four guardian deities called the Four Heavenly Kings or Four Diamond Kings.  Chinese Buddhist temples consist of several halls and chapels called by a common name, tien.  In the "entering hall" (s-iien wang-tien), two colossal wooden statues meet the eye on each side.  These are the Mahrjas, or "Four great kings of Devas," or S-ta-tien-wang.  The Sanskrit names are explained: "Vaishramana" (Pi-sha-men), "He who has heard much;" "Dhritarashtra" (Ti-to-lo-to), "Protector of kingdoms;" "Virudhaka" (Pi-leu-le-cha), "Increased grandeur;" and Virupaksha (Pi-lieu-pa-cha), "Large Eyes." They are called in Chinese To-wen, Ch-kwo, Tseng-chang, and Kwang-mu." 

Chinese Buddhism   and   The Four Heavenly Kings - Wikipedia   and   Four Heavenly Kings
 

                         

 

"Virudhaka, Guardian of the South Gate, 
The Boundless Diamond King, Tseng-chang Tian, with shimmering sword in hand,
Blue as the Great Sky,
Spurring growth, increasing grandeur,
Subduing demons, frightening evil ones, cutting through ignorance,
Vowing to help everyone master limitless approaches to Dharma.  

Dhritarashtra, Guardian of the East Gate,
The Powerful Diamond King, Ch-kwo Tian, in tune with the Wise,
White as the Shining Sun,
Protector, Energizer, Honoring the Three Treasures,
Keeping Treasured Kingdoms whole, Saver of the Earth, 
Helping unravel the illusions of self, and freeing the slaves of Mara,
Vowing to aid all who strive to achieve the Supreme Awakening.

Vaishravana, Guardian of the North Gate,
The All Hearing Diamond King, To-wen Tian, listening to the endless sorrows,
Yellow as the Mystic Rose,
Seated and Silent, Compassionate,
Silencing the falsehoods, Singing the Dharma, Preserving the Word,
Vowing the eradicate vexations without end.  

Virupaksha, Guardian of the West Gate,
The All Seeing Diamond King, Kwang-mu Tian, unblinking in the face of death,
Red Eyed and Ever Vigilant,
Visionary of the Diamond Kings, Seeing the Unseen,
Subduing serpents of vice, keeping enemies in the dark, holding the Sacred Vajra,
Vowing to help Enlighten Sentient Beings without number.  


These Four Diamond Kings protect all Earthly and Sacred Worlds,
Faithfully Guard the Four Gates to Shambhala's Realm,
Active day and night on Mt. Sumeru and in the Ten Thousand Realms,
Rewarding the good and reforming the evil ones,
Overcoming all obstacles,
Fearless Defenders of the Middle Way,
Bodhisattvas ferrying followers to the Other Shore,
Grinding potions with mortar and pestle to Lessen the Pain, 
Sending Dragons into the deepest seas, riding Tigers to the Mountains,
Moving the Vast Clouds with Their Hands;
Yet, the Four Diamond Kings all bow in deep respect,
Honoring the Great Dharma Lord they forever serve."
-   Michael P. Garofalo, Above the Fog


 

The Bodhisattva Warriors.  The Origin, Inner Philosophy, History and Symbolism of the Buddhist Martial Art within India and China.  By Shifu Nagaboshi Tomio (Terence Dukes).  Boston, MA, Weiser Books, 1994.  Index, bibliography, extensive notes, 527 pages.  ISBN: 0877287856.  VSCL.   

 

"The phrase Four Buddha Warriors, or Four Tigers refers to the Tai Chi Masters Chen Xiaowang, Chen Zhenlei, Wang Xi'an and Zhu Tiancai.  The phrase was coined by a journalist in the early 1980's because the four were all roughly the same age, and all came out looking for trouble at the same time. They were also the top practitioners at that time. Since then, the term has taken on a life of its own."

 

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3.   Lazily Tying One's Coat   (Lan Zha Yi)
     
He Gathers His Belongings

 

He Gathers His Belongings, Putting On Your Clothes, Lazily Hanging Up One's Coat 
Lazy About Tying the Coat    [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005]   
Lazily Tying One's Coat (Lan Zha Yi)    [Chen Zhenglei 2003] 
Lazily Tucking Clothes (Lan Zha Yi)  [Mark Chen] 
Grasp Sparrow's Tail  [Jou Tsung Hwa] 
Lazily Tying Coat (Lan Zha Yi)  [Sim & Gaffney] 
Holding One Lap Pull of the Robe  (Lan Zha Yi)  [Chen Xin, 1932, 2007] 
Lazy About Tying Coat  [Zhaohua]
Attacher Paresseux Son Manteau 
Irgendjemandes Mantel Faul Binden 
Perezoso Atar Su Capa  
懒扎衣  :  Lan Zha Yi 
Head-on Wrenching Hand (Ying-mian Ban Shou), Shaolin Tai Tzu Chang Quan Yi Lu, from military Hong Quan, circa 970 CE.   
 


3.  Description of Movements in Movement Sequence (Postures, Forms) #3:
Lazily Tying One's Coat, He Gathers His Belongings, Putting On Your Clothes, Hanging Up Your Coat

 

 

 

3.  Comments about Posture #3:
Lazily Tying One's Coat, He Gathers His Belongings, Putting On Your Clothes, Hanging Up Your Coat

 

               

"The Karate Kid" 2010 Film.  Starring Jackie Chan and Jaden Smith.
Hanging up your coat training with Mr. Han.  Reminiscent of wax on
and wax off training in 1984 with Mr. Miyagi.

 

Lazily Tying One's Coat
Dingdian, ending posture


 

 

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All of the Text Below will be Revised After January 14, 2018. 

 

 

 

 

4.   Six Sealing and Four Closing   (Liu Feng Si Bi)

 

Six Sealing and Four Closing    [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005]  
Sealing Six Avenues of Attack and Closing Four Sides (Liu Feng Si Bi)    [Chen Zhenglei 2003] 
Six Sealing, Four Closing (Liu Feng Si Bi)  [Mark Chen] 
40% Open and 60% Closed  [Jou Tsung Hwa] 
Six Sealing and Four Closing (Liu Feng Si Bi)  [Sim & Gaffney] 
Six Sealing and Four Closing  [Zhaohua] 
Six Scellant et Fermeture Quatre 
Sechs Versiegelnd und Vier Schlieend   
Seises que Sellan y Cuatro que se Cierran  
六封四闭  :  Liu Feng Si Bi

 

 

 

A note on the source of the illustrations.

 

 


4h.  Head facing NE2.  Right arm pointing towards NE2.   

Martial Applications of Six Sealing and Four Closing, UTube, 1:29 minutes. 

Troubleshooting "6 Sealing and 4 Closing."  Comments on short forms and the left version of this movement and 60%/40%. 

"However-- I have to disagree that there is deep meaning in the movements at all, let alone in the Chinese names as opposed to the English translations. This is a martial art; or if it's not really a martial art anymore as it's frequently taught, it still has martial origins. The movements aren't mystical clues a la Dan Brown; they're punches, kicks, throws, blocks, etc. They don't have MEANING, they have PURPOSE. Furthermore, the names for the movements are often misleading, uninformative, or open to interpretation. Chen taiji stylists say "six sealing, four closing"; Yang taiji people say "like sealing, like closing", or shorten the whole thing to "apparently closing". The two phrases sound very similar in Mandarin; they're written with different characters, but the martial artists who originally came up with the names were illiterate, so we don't really know what they had in mind. I'm inclined to think it means six parts sealing, four parts closing, except I don't really understand what the difference is between the two verbs in the first place."  -  Jerry Larson  

I believe that "deep meanings" can be associated with any movement.  Philosophers and scholars who practice Taijiquan and Qigong have long been interested in using and connecting  Buddhist, Taoist, I Ching, Confucian, Chinese cultural, and Traditional Chinese Medical ideas, theories, practices, and iconography with various internal martial arts and Daoyin mind-body movement arts.  Sun Lu Tang, Cheng Man Ching and others helped popularize internal martial arts by making these theoretical, metaphorical, and "mystical" connections.  Most people who practice Taijiquan these days know no little or nothing about martial applications, but still greatly enjoy this mind-body art.  These days, in the post-firearms era, many persons find the health improving, stress reducing, meditative, spiritual, and mystical aspects of "New Age" Taijiquan more useful, uplifting, and meaningful than thinking about how they might kick someone's butt in a bar fight. We often "think" via associative and metaphorical means, thrive on open interpretations, and cherish imaginative games.  We now have a greater need to fight stress, boredom, rigid thinking, literalism, and laziness. Taijiquan can seal us off from these destructive forces. 

"The training exercises of Taiji, like those from all the internal martial arts traditions of China, are designed to build gong.  What does it mean to built gong?  Physically, the accumulation of gong refers to constant improvements in balance, coordination, agility, flexibility, sensitivity, and strength or power.  Mentally and spiritually, the accumulation of gong refers to improved awareness and confidence, and constant advancements toward realizing tranquility of heart and mind.  These physical, mental and spiritual improvements are the benefits and purpose of practice.  The priority of accumulating gong (as opposed to martial technique or trickery) is repeatedly emphasized in many of the most famous sayings from the oral tradition of the Chinese internal martial arts."
-   Yang Yang,  Taijiquan: The Art of Nurturing, The Science of Power, 2005, p. 5.

 

The best description of the Chen Taijiquan, Short 18 Form, is found in Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yuei's Tai Chi for Health, 2005, pp. 75-115.  Each move in the Chen 18 Form is also found in the Chen Taijiquan Old Frame First Form Laojia Yilu 74 Movements Form, and the most detailed description of the Laojia Yilu is found in Chen Zhenglei's book Chen Style Taijiquan: Sword and Broadsword, 2003, pp. 65-262. 

 

 

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5.   Single Whip   (Dan Bian

 

Single Whip (Dan Bian)    [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005; Chen Zhenglei 2003]
Single Whip (Dan Bian)  [Mark Chen] 
Single Whip  [Jou Tsung Hwa]
Single Whip (Dan Bian)  [Sim & Gaffney] 
Single Whip  (Dan Bian)  [Chen Xin]
Single Whip  [Zhaohua]
Choisissez Le Fouet 
Single Peitsche  
Escoja El Azote
 
单鞭  :  Dan Bian 
Pull up hidden block (Liao Yin Jie), Shaolin Tai Tzu Chang Quan Yi Lu, from military Hong Quan, circa 970 CE.   

 

 

 


5e.  Head facing W9.  Chest facing N12.  Left hand facing W9.     

The best description of the Chen Taijiquan, Short 18 Form, is found in Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yuei's Tai Chi for Health, 2005, pp. 75-115. 

How many minutes will it typically take to perform the entire Chen Taijiquan, Short 18 Form?

 

"Taijiquan is like a bright mirror -
it reflects our physical and mental weaknesses,
we need to polish it constantly to see our true selves."  

 

"In practicing taijiquan, the requirements on the different parts of the body are: keeping a straight body; keeping the head and neck erect with mindfulness at the tip of the head as if one is lightly lifted by a string from above; relaxing the shoulders and sinking the elbows; relaxing the chest and waist letting them sink down; relaxing the crotch and bending the knees. When these requirements are met, one's inner energy will naturally sink down to the dan tian. Beginners may not be able to master all these important points instantly. However, in their practice they must try to be accurate in terms of direction, angle, position, and the movements of hands and legs for each posture. At this stage, one need not place too much emphasis on the requirements for different parts of the body, appropriate simplications are acceptable. For example, for the head and upper body, it is required that the head and neck be kept erect, chest and waist be relaxed downward, but in the first level of kung fu, it will be sufficient just to ensure that one's head and body are kept naturally upright and not leaning forward or backward, to the left or right. This is just like learning calligraphy, at the beginning, one need only to make sure that the strokes are correct. Therefore, when practicing taijiquan at the beginning, the body and movements may appear to be stiff; or 'externally solid but internally empty'. One may find oneself doing things like: hard hitting, ramming, sudden uplifting and or sudden collapsing of body or trunk. There may be also be broken or over-exerted force or jin. All these faults are common to beginners. If one is persistent enough and practices seriously everyday, one can normally master the forms within half a year. The inner energy, qi, can gradually be induced to move within the trunk and limbs with refinements in one's movements. One may then achieve the stage of being able to use external movements to channel internal energy'. The first level kung fu thus begins with mastering the postures to gradually being able to detect and understand jin or force."
Seattle School of Chen Style Taijiquan

 

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6.   White Crane Spreads Its Wings   (Bai E Liang Chi

 

White Crane Spreads Its Wings   [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005] 
White Goose Spreading Its Wings  (Bai E Liang Chi)  [Chen Zhenglei 2003]
White Goose Spreads Wings  (Bai E Liang Chi)  [Mark Chen] 
White Crane Spreads Wings  [Jou Tsung Hwa] 
White Crane Spreads Its Wings (Bai He Liang Che)  [Sim & Gaffney] 
White Goose Reveals Its Wings  (Bai E Liang Chi)  [Chen Xin 1932, 2007]
The White Crane Spreads Its Wings  [Zhaohua] 
La Grue Blanche Rpand Ses Ailes 
Weier Kran Verbreitet Seine Flgel 
La Gra Blanca Separa Sus Alas 
白鵝亮翅  :  Bai E Liang Chi 
Support Forearm (Cheng Bang), Shaolin Tai Tzu Chang Quan Yi Lu, from military Hong Quan, circa 970 CE.   

 



6a.  Face

The best description of the Chen Taijiquan, Short 18 Form, is found in Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yuei's Tai Chi for Health, 2005, pp. 75-115. 

 

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7.   Walk Diagonally   (Xie Xing

 

Walk Diagonally  [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005]
Diagonal Posture  (Xie Xing)  [Chen Zhenglei 2003] 
Oblique Posture  (Xie Xing)  [Mark Chen]
Kick Forward and Twist Step  [Jou Tsung Hwa]
Walking Obliquely (Xie Xing)  [Sim & Gaffney] 
Walking Obliquely and Twist Step on Both Sides  [Zhaohua] 
Marche Incline 
Schrg Gelegenes Gehen 
El Caminar Inclinado 
斜行  :  Xie Xing

 



A note on the directional scheme.  

7a.  Face

The best description of the Chen Taijiquan, Short 18 Form, is found in Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yuei's Tai Chi for Health, 2005, pp. 75-115. 

"The 18 form takes the essential movements of LaoJia YiLu and removes much of the repetition to create a short form that retains the essence of YiLu without requiring as much time to learn or to perform. This is an ideal form for beginners who want to gain the benefits of practicing YiLu in a shorter amount of time. The experienced practitioner will gain the benefits of being able to refine movements directly applicable to YiLu as well as learning a useful form to teach to beginners or to practice when time constraints don't allow you to practice the full form. Learn this form from the person who created it!"
Tai Chi Center UK

 

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8.   Brush Knee   (Lou Xi

 

Brush Knee  (Lou Xi)  [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005]  
Holding Up the Knee  (Lou Xi)  [Chen Zhenglei 2003] 
Embrace Knee  (Lou Xi)  [Mark Chen] 
Brushing Knees (Lou Xi)  [Sim & Gaffney] 
Genou De Brosse 
Brste Knie 
Rodilla Del Cepillo
搂膝  :  Lou Xi



8a.  Face

The best description of the Chen Taijiquan, Short 18 Form, is found in Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yuei's Tai Chi for Health, 2005, pp. 75-115. 

 

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9.   Stepping to Both Sides   
      (Ao Bu

 

Stepping to Both Sides (Three Steps Forward)  (Ao Bu)   [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005]
Stepping to Both Sides (Ao Bu)  [Chen Zhenglei 2003]
Twist Steps  (Ao Bu)   [Mark Chen]  
Side Walk and Twist Step [Jou Tsung Hwa]  
Stepping Three Steps (Shan San Bu)  [Sim & Gaffney] 
Brush Knee and Twist Step  (Lou Xi Ao-bu)  [Chen Xin 1932, 2007]
Wade Forward and Twist Step on Both Sides  [Zhaohua] 
Progression Aux Deux Cts 
Treten Zu Beiden Seiten 
El Caminar a Ambos Lados 
拗步  :  Ao Bu



9a.  Face

The best description of the Chen Taijiquan, Short 18 Form, is found in Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yuei's Tai Chi for Health, 2005, pp. 75-115.  Each move in the Chen 18 Form is also found in the Chen Taijiquan Old Frame First Form Laojia Yilu 74 Movements Form, and the most detailed description of the Laojia Yilu is found in Chen Zhenglei's book Chen Style Taijiquan: Sword and Broadsword, 2003, pp. 65-262. 

How many minutes will it typically take to perform the entire Chen Taijiquan, Short 18 Form?

 

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10.   Cover Hands and Strike with Fist  
        (Yan Shou Gong Quan

 

Cover Hands and Strike with Fist   [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005]  
Cover Fist and Punch  (Yan Shou Gong Quan)  [Chen Zenglei 2003] 
Covered Hand Punch  (Yan Shou Hong Quan)  [Mark Chen] 
Hidden Hand Punch  [Jou Tsung Hwa] 
Hidden Thrust Punch and Whirling Upper Arms (Yan Shou Hong Quan)  [Sim & Gaffney] 
Screening Hand Strike with Hidden Forearm  (Yan Shou Gong Chui)  [Chen Xin]
The Fist of Covering Hand and Arm  [Zhaohua] 
Covered Fist Punch  [Mike Garofalo]  My Notes on Movement 14
Poinon Couvert De Poing 
Bedeckter Faust-Durchschlag 
Sacador Cubierto Del Puo
掩手肱拳  :  Yan Shou Hong Quan



10a.  Face

 

 

 

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11.   High Pat on the Horse   (Gao Tan Ma

 

High Pat on the Horse  (Gao Tan Ma)   [Cheng Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005]
Patting the Horse's Back  (Gao Tan Ma)  [Chen Zhenglei 2003]  
High Pat on Horse  (Gao Tan Ma)  [Mark Chen]
High Pat on Horse  [Jou Tsung Hwa] 
High Pat on Horse  (Gao Tan Ma)  [Sim & Gaffney]
High Pat on the Horse  (Gao Tan Ma)  [Chen Xin]
High Pat on Horse  [Zhaohua]
高探马  :  Gao Tan Ma



11a.  Face

Martial Applications of High Pat on Horse, UTube, 1:10 minutes. 

The best description of the Chen Taijiquan, Short 18 Form, is found in Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yuei's Tai Chi for Health, 2005, pp. 75-115.  Each move in the Chen 18 Form is also found in the Chen Taijiquan Old Frame First Form Laojia Yilu 74 Movements Form, and the most detailed description of the Laojia Yilu is found in Chen Zhenglei's book Chen Style Taijiquan: Sword and Broadsword, 2003, pp. 65-262. 

How many minutes will it typically take to perform the entire Chen Taijiquan, Short 18 Form?

 

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12.   Kick with the Left Heel   (Zuo Deng Yi Gen

 

Kick with the Left Heel  (Zuo Deng Yi Gen)   [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005] 
Kicking with the Left Heel  (Zuo Deng Yi Gen)  [Chen Zhenglei 2003]  
Left Heel Kick  (Zuo Deng Yi Gen)  [Mark Chen]
Turn Body and Kick  [Jou Tsung Hwa] 
Kick with the Left Heel  (Zuo Deng Gen)  [Sim & Gaffney]
Kick with Left Heel  [Zhaohua] 
左蹬跟  :  Zuo Deng Gen


12a.  Face

 

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13.   Jade Maiden Working Her Loom   (Yu Nu Chuan Suo

 

Jade Girl Works the Shuttles  (Yu Nu Chuan Suo)   [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005] 
Jade Maiden Working Her Loom  (Yu Nu Chuan Suo)  [Chen Zhenglei 2003]  
Jade Maiden Works Shuttles  (Yu Nu Chuan Suo)  [Mark Chen]
Fair Lady Works at Shuttles  [Jou Tsung Hwa] 
Jade Girl Works Shuttles  (Yu Nu Quan Shou)  [Sim & Gaffney]
Fair Lady Works the Shuttles  (Yu Nu Chuan Suo)  [Chen Xin] 
The Jade Girl Works at Shuttles  [Zhaohua] 
玉女穿梭  :  Yu Nu Quan Shou



13a.  Face

 

It might be helpful to consider each posture from the perspective of the "Sixteen Requirements" set forth by Chen Zhaokui (1928-1981) in his book "Entering the Door of Taijiquan" (Sim and Gaffney 2002: 116):

"Chen Zhaokui lists sixteen requirements that must be present throughout each posture:
Eye movement (the direction of the eyes)
The shape of the hands, and how the hand changes as the movement is being performed
Footwork (how to execute changes when stepping)
Shun-chan
and ni-chan of the legs
Open and closing of the chest and back  
Rising and falling of the buttocks  
Dantian rotation (waist and lower abdomen) 
Shifting weight (the relationship of substantial and insubstantial) 
Beginning and end points, as well as the transition movements of the upper and lower limbs 
How much strength to us, and where the strength should be concentrated (i.e., where is the attack point) 
Position and direction of posture 
The rise and fall of spiral movement (top and bottom coordination) 
The change in tempo (alternating slow and fast) 
Breathing (coordination of breathing and movement)  
Listening."

 

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14.   Cloud Hands   (Yun Shou

 

Wave Hands  (Yun Shou)   [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005] 
Rolling Hands Through the Clouds  (Yun Shou)  [Chen Zhenglei 2003]  
Hand Technique  (Yun Shou)  [Mark Chen]
Waving Hands Like Clouds  [Jou Tsung Hwa] 
Cloud Hands  (Yun Shou)  [Sim & Gaffney]
Wave Hands Like Clouds  (Xia Yun Shou)  [Chen Xin] 
Wave Hands  [Zhaohua] 
雲手 v运手  :  Yun Shou



14a.  Face

 

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15.   Turn Body with a Double Lotus Kick  
        (Zhuan Shen Shuang Bai Lian

 

Turn Body with Double Lotus Kick  [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005] 
Turning Around and Sweeping with Both Legs  (Zhuan Shen Shuang Bai Lian)  [Chen Zhenglei 2003]  
Swing Foot  (Bai Jiao)  [Mark Chen]
Turn Around and Sweep Lotus  [Jou Tsung Hwa] 
Turn Back and Wave Double Lotus  (Zhuan Shen Shuang Bai Lian)  [Sim & Gaffney]
Shake Foot  (Bai Jiao)  [Chen Xin] 
Turn Body and Double Wave Lotus  [Zhaohua] 
双摆莲  :  Shuang Bai Jiao  :  Slap Foot



15a.  Face

 

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16.   Cannon Fist Over the Head  
        (Dang Tou Pao

 

Cannon Fist Over the Head   [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005]
Cannon Right Overhead  (Dang Tou Pao)  [Chen Zhenglei 2003]  
Head-on Cannon  (Dang Men Pao)  [Mark Chen]
Face Opponent Cannon  [Jou Tsung Hwa] 
Head-on Blow  (Dang Tou Pao)  [Sim & Gaffney]
Head-on Blow  (Dang Tou Pao)  [Chen Xin] 
The Cannon Right Overhead  [Zhaohua] 
当头炮  : Dang Tou Pao

 



15a.  Face

 

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17.   Buddha's Warrior Attendant Pounds the Mortar  
        (Jin Gang Dao Dui)

 

Buddha's Warrior Attendant Pounds Mortar   [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005]   
Pounding the Mortar (Jin Gang Dao Dui)   [Chen Zhenglei 2003]
Diamond King Pounds Mortar  (Jin Gang Dao Dui)  [Mark Chen]
King-Kong Nailed Fist  [Jou Tsung Hwa] 
Buddha's Warrior Attendant Pounds Mortar (Jin Gang Dao Dui)  [Sim & Gaffney] 
Buddha's Warrior Attendant Pounds with Pestle  (Jin-gang Dao Dui)  [Chen Xin 1932, 2007]
Buddha's Warrior Attendant Pounds Mortar  [Zhaohua]
Martlement du Mortier 
Zerstoen des Mrsers
 
Golpear el Mortero
金刚捣碓  :  Jin Gang Dao Dui



17a.  Face

 

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18.   Closing Posture of Taiji  (Taiji Shou Shi)   
        

Finishing Form   [Chen Zhenglei and Liming Yue 2005]  
Closing Posture of Taijiquan  (Taiji Shou Shi)  [Chen Zhenglei]  
Closing Movement  (Shou Shi)  [Mark Chen]
Conclusion of Tai-Chi  [Jou Tsung Hwa] 
Closing Form  (Taiji Shou Si)  [Sim & Gaffney]
Closing Form  [Zhaohua] 
收式  :  Shou Shi



18a.  Face

 

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Chen Style Taijiquan
Suggestions for Beginning Your Practice of Chen Taijiquan
By Mike Garofalo

 

If you are fortunate enough to have a qualified instructor teaching you the Chen Taijiquan short 18 form, then just resolve to carefully and diligently learn from that instructor and practice often on your own. 

If, like me, you do not have a local Chen Taijiquan instructor to teach you directly, then you can still proceed to learn and practice the basics on your own using instructional DVDs, books, and Internet resources.  I live in a rural area that is 130 miles from Sacramento, California, where there are some Chen Taijiquan teachers. 

The instructional DVDs and books I have used are listed in the bibliography on this webpage.  In particular, I used the following four resources on a daily basis when first learning the basics of this form:

1.  Chen Style Tai Chi Essential 18 Postures with Patrick Martin.  Instructional DVD, 2 DVDs, 238 minutes.  Disk 1, 130 Minutes.  Jade Dragon Tai Chi International, Empty Circle Productions, 2008.  VSCL.  Patrick Martin is a student of Grandmaster Chen Zhenglei, and has been practicing and teaching Chen style Tai Chi for the last 20 years.  Detailed instruction for each movement sequence.  This would be my first choice for an excellent instructional DVD on the Chen 18 Form. 

2.  Essence of Traditional Chen Style 18 Posture Short Form.  Instructional DVD, 87 Minutes, with teaching by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  (Note: Some of the angles of the postures in this instructional DVD do not match those of Grandmaster Chen Zhenglei, so one needs to carefully adjust one's practice to the standard set by Grandmaster Chen Zhenglei.  However, this instructional DVD is very useful for English learners in the USA.)

3.  Tai Chi for Health.  By Grandmaster Chen Zhenglei and Master Liming Yue.  Textbook for the 18 Form, warm ups, silk reeling, principles. 

4.  Health Preserving Qigong, Chen-style TaiChi Quan I.  Instructional DVD by Grandmaster Chen Zhenglei.  3 instructional DVDs in the Chinese language with English and Chinese subtitles.  ISBN: 7883046802.  "By Chen Zhenglei. 3 DVDs. A brief introductory section is in Chinese only, but teaching is in Chinese with English and Chinese subtitles. He teaches introductory and foundation exercises as well as an 18 movement form based on Chen Laojia with the difficult moves removed. The teaching is detailed with multiple repetitions and different camera angles."  - Wayfarer.   VSCL.  These instructional DVDs cover the exact same material as found in the book Tai Chi for Health.  The English subtitles are adequate for understanding, although the printed translations are a bit ungrammatical and awkward at times; or, I would have preferred a voice over by an English speaker. 

   I have given a number of suggestions to beginners about learning Taijiquan in my webpage on the Standard 24 Beijing Short Form in the Yang Style of Taijiquan.  

I also post to my Cloud Hands Blog about Chen Taijiquan

Beginning students need to keep in mind that Grandmaster Chen Zhenglei recommends in his text book Tai Chi for Health a program of study and practice including:

    1.  Warm up exercises.  He provides an interesting gentle warm up routine, or you can practice a variety of qigong routines, e.g., Eight Section Brocade, Five Animal Frolics, etc. 

    2.  Standing or seated meditation.  The subject of quiet sitting, post standing, and meditation is quite complex.  It is one of the cornerstones of Buddhist and Daoist practices. 

    3.  Silk Reeling exercises.  These exercises involve twisting, turning, circling, twining, reeling, winding movements - both externally and internally. 

    4.  Practicing the Chen Tai Chi Short 18 Movement Routine

Learning and practicing with a group can always be fun and beneficial.  A dedicated Taijiquan practice group does not always need a "leader" to succeed in helping you learn and practice. 

I always recommend learning from the Master Teachers of Chen Taijiquan by READING their books and using their instructional DVDs

Keep looking for Chen Taijiquan workshops, seminars, and camps that you can attend.  Maybe we will meet at one of these events in 2016 in the Western USA. 

   My very best wishes to you for much success in your study and practice of the Chen Taijiquan Short 18 Form. 
  
   May we all enjoy good health, peace and prosperity in 2016,

       
        
        Mike Garofalo
        
        March 2016, Valley Spirit Center, Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California
        

 

 

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How Can You Be Successful in Your Taijiquan Training

By Michael P. Garofalo, Valley Spirit Taijiquan, Red Bluff, California

March of 2016


1.  Get stronger in your legs and waist.  I recommend walking for 1.5 hours four days a week at a brisk pace to condition the legs and waist.   Taijiquan requires you to stand and move for 60 to 90 minutes during a typical Taijiquan practice session or class.  "Tai Chi" (Taijiquan) could also be called "Thigh Chi" because of the demands it makes on the legs and waist.  You need some cardio-vascular (aerobic) training, like long walks, to condition the heart and lungs and legs to better prepare for the demands of Taijiquan training.  Most Taijiquan Masters recommend practicing standing postures (Ma Bu, Trinity, Zhang Zhuang) to improve concentration. self-discipline, and leg strength.  Standing still and holding some part of a numbered Chen Taijiquan posture, e.g., some part of Lazily Tying the Coat; keeping perfectly still, not moving, holding an isometric posture for 45 seconds, static discipline ... will indeed strengthen your legs, hips and waist. 

2.  Practice, Learn, Practice, Learn, Practice, Learn, Practice, Learn ....  The daily practice of the Taijiquan Forms and Sets is required for "success" (i.e., achievement, skill, adeptness, facility, superior performance, excellence, advancement, fluency, etc.) in Taijiquan training.  You must challenge yourself to learn more each month.  Hard work and dedication (Kung Fu) are necessary for integrating the practice of Taijiquan in your life. 

3.  Listen, observe, imitate, and learn from your Taijiquan teachers.  Use the many fine instructional DVDs now available to learn more about the Taijiquan forms you are practicing.  Read books and magazine articles and web pages, and study UTube demonstrations, to learn more about the Taijiquan forms you are practicing.  Learn more about the history and styles of Taijiquan.  If you are among the few persons fortunate enough to learn directly from a Taijiquan master or grandmaster, then treasure this unique learning opportunity, and advance accordingly under their tutelage.  Give respect to teachers who have earned and deserve respect.  Be humble and open-minded so as to properly absorb new information, ideas, and techniques.  Don't be overly judgmental of others, but don't be a fawning fool or credulous. 

4.  Taijiquan has "Principles" that should be embodied and exemplified in your mind-body practice of this ancient Chinese art.  Some time must be spent learning these key ideas, concepts and principles so as to integrate them into your practice.  For examples, concepts like relaxed, sinking, centering, weighted, balanced, energized, focused, intentions, opponent, forms, styles, heart-mind, spirit, etc., must be learned.  Some understanding and appreciation for the Taoist outlook is valuable and useful for advancement in Taijiquan.  

5.  Find the Taijiquan style suitable to your physique, age, temperament, attitude, limitations, and physical condition.  Select an intensity of practice suitable to your energy level for the day or week, and any physical limitations of a temporary or permanent nature.  Be flexible, explore, adapt, and experiment to find appropriate solutions to your specific individual circumstances.  Cultivate good self-awareness and realistic views of your personal skill sets.  Avoid too many comparisons with other more advanced Taijiquan players.  

6.  Be detailed orientated.  Be precise in your movements, postures, and sequences.  Appreciate the beauty and function of the movements in the tradition of Taijiquan that you practice.  Learn the sequence and names (English and Chinese) for all the parts and postures of the Taijiquan forms you are studying.

7.  Fight against your real opponents: inactivity, laziness, inflexibility, weakness, inertia, fear, worry, depression, confusion, and sloth.  You are training to become stronger, more agile, more balanced, more enlightened, more conditioned.  You serious efforts in your Taijiquan training will help to ward of disease, improve your immunity, strengthen you muscles, improve your cardio-vascular functioning, ameliorate existing health problems, brighten your attitude, uplift your spirits, calm your emotions, and boost your confidence.  Taijiquan is a self-defense system against poor health habits and sloppy living.  Your final opponents are illness and dying.  Fight on, brothers and sisters!! 

8.  Be patient.  Think and act in terms of months, seasons, and years.  Persevere through the inevitable stale, boring, plateau periods when progress seems stuck.  Consistent practice cultivates will power.  Don't give up.  Have confidence that your self-discipline will bear fruit in due season, and create the seeds leading to a new and rewarding self-appreciation and self-respect. 

9.  Accept the fact that you will make mistakes, mistakenly concieve, stumble, incorrectly apply, and lack depth of understanding.  You will get to correct, change, and modify how you have learned (incorrectly) to habitually move.  You will need to relearn movements.  Make the effort and train. 

 

"The space, the distance between the incorrect and correct execution of the movements, is what we call temporary mistakes, mistakes that occur midway, obstacles so to speak.  These mistakes, these obstacles on the trail are part of the normal course of learning Taijiquan; they belong to it and are part of the way of learning the Gong, that is: the artistry.
-  Chen Xiaowang interview, Chen by Jan Silberstorff, p. 270. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Endnotes, Postscript 

 

Chen Style Taijiquan
Grandmaster Chen Xiaowang's Short 19 Movements Tai Chi Hand Form


 

 

 

 

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Directional Nomenclature

Standard Directional Scheme I Use for Describing Directions of Movements in Taijiquan Forms
Used By Mike Garofalo

Directional Instructions

 

Key Clock Hour
Direction
Compass
Direction A

     
N 12 12:00 o'clock North - Front Side of Body
NE 1 1:30 o'clock Northeast
E 3 3:00 o'clock East - Right Side of Body
SE 4 4:30 o'clock Southeast
S 6 6:00 o'clock South - Back Side of Body
SW 7 7:30 o'clock Southwest
W 9 9:00 o'clock West - Left Side of Body
NW 10 10:30 o'clock Northwest

 

 

 

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A Note to Readers: 

     The Cloud Hands Taijiquan webpages have been online continuously since 2001.  In 2009, for example, over 1,350,000 webpages (excluding graphics), webpage views, were served to readers around the world from six websites: Cloud Hands Taijiquan, Valley Spirit Qigong, Ways of Walking, Taoism, Virtues, and Yoga.  Since 2005, I have also provided information about Body-Mind Arts, Philosophy, and the Eight Ways at my Cloud Hands Blog.  Since these hypertext notebooks have been freely available on stable and well established websites, they have provided readers with a good and secure starting point for their online research into topics like Nei Gong, Chi Kung, Taijiquan, Philosophy, Walking, The Tao Te Ching, Daoism, Inner and Outer Work and Play, Meditation, and Yoga.  The Cloud Hands websites are funded entirely by Green Way Research, with volunteer efforts by Michael P. Garofalo

     As I write in 2018, I have been providing hypertext notebooks on these subjects for over 17 years, and easily over 22 million webpage views have been served to people around the world. 

     Unfortunately, as everyone knows, many other websites and webpages, documents, photographs, and videos appear and then disappear from the Internet scene.  Authors do not pay to keep up their web hosting services, loose a "free hosting" option, change filenames, recode away from HTML, move to a new information distribution software platform like Drupal or another database application, or decide to remove the webpages for various reasons.  Consequently, links to some good webpages or videos become invalid and the files are no longer found on the Internet.  You may find a some of these "dead links" to nonexistent webpages or videos cited in my hypertext documents.  Unfortunately, there are few ways to to avoid this troublesome situation.  For these reasons, it is important to have a tactic planned for saving files.  When you do find a good and useful webpage or file, be sure to save the webpage or file to a folder on your hard drive, or server, or Cloud memory.  I've used AskSam, Microsoft OneNote, and Cloud Server services for organized file saving.   

    In most of my hypertext notebooks, books cited in my bibliography on a subject are all arranged in title order.  Links to a WWW Internet webpage, website, resource, or service are all arranged in title order.  Links to books, documents, or online video files are arranged in title order.  Links to books or merchandise are typically through Amazon.Com.  An overall index to my hypertext notebooks is available. 

    I welcome your suggestions for how to improve this webpage.  Your comments, ideas, contributions, and constructive criticism are encouraged.  Send your suggestions to my email box.

 

 

 

 


 

Cloud Hands - Yun Shou

Cloud Hands Website

 

Michael P. Garofalo, 2018-   All Rights Reserved

 

This webpage was last edited, modified or updated on January 14, 2018.     

This webpage was first published on the Internet on January 6, 2018. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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