Temple Qigong

A Chi Kung Exercise Set with Nine Movements
Tai Chi Temple Qigong, Nine Temple Exercises of Master Marshall Ho'o


Researched by

Michael P. Garofalo


Instructions     Links     Bibliography     Lessons     Movement Names

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Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, 2003-2012
By Michael P. Garofalo, All Rights Reserved.

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Names of the Movements
Temple Qigong 


Standing Meditation, Resting Position: Wuji

1.   Turning the Prayer Wheel

2.   Rotating the Knees

3.   Crossed Arm Rotation

4.   Picking Fruit

5.   Swinging the Leg

6.   Leg Bounce

7.   Retreat and Advance   

8.   Grinding Corn

9.   Polishing the Mirror    

Closure: Collecting and Storing Energy
 

These are the names used by Master Marshall Ho'o for the movements of the "Nine Temple Exercises" found in his 1986 book "Tai Chi Chuan."  The instructions by Master Ho'o for performing each exercise are very succinct, since the main focus of that small 111 page book is on teaching the Standard 24 Tai Chi Form.  Other Qigong teachers have given the Temple Qigong movements different names, and I have listed these alternative names within my more lengthy instructions for each movement.  I do not always do each movement exactly in the same way as briefly described by Master Ho'o, and I make special notes about the differences in the text below.  Since other Qigong teachers have done similar movements, especially from the Shaolin Temple Lohan Qigong tradition, I include notes and links to other resources for each movement. 

 

Standing Meditation
 

Preparation or Resting Position, Opening Posture
This is the Wu Ji Position or Mountain Pose (Tadasana)

Relax, shoulders down, arms down, hands facing thighs.
Relax, sink, and root.
Keep feet together and stay balanced.
Clear, empty, free, open up your mind.
Feel you body and sense your environment.
Breathe in through the nose and out through the mouth.
Relax your abdomen as you inhale deeply.
Tighten your abdomen as you exhale completely.
Keep your head up.  
Stand up straight.  
Keep your eyes open.  Have a relaxed an wide angle focus.
Smile softly and enjoy yourself.
This position is called the "Return to Wuji" or the "resting position."

Return to this position after each exercise and take a number of deep breaths.
Keep shoulders down and relaxed.  

Breathing during each movement is in through the nose and out through the mouth, except as noted. 
Beathe deeply into lungs as you relax your abdomen; tighten your abdomen gently as you exhale.  

Throughout the various exercises emphasize:

Keep your balance.
Moving slowly, smoothly, and deliberately.
Feeling parts of the body.
Being solidly rooted or connected to the earth. 
Breathing deeply, easily, and regularly.
Stay relaxed, open, soft.
Discovering where you are not in balance.
Keeping centered and balanced.  Maintaining "central equilibrium." 
Going deeper in the stances to challenge the body.
Following the instructions for how you are to use your eyes.  
Trying to stay calm, peaceful, unworried, open and easy-going.  

Refer to my remarks about the Wuji Posture and "Return to Wuji" in the webpage The Eight Section Brocade Chi Kung, The Magic Pear Qigong, and Standing Meditation.  The Wuji Posture is called the Mountain Pose or Tadasana in Hatha Yoga. 

 

 

 

Lessons
Temple Chi Kung

 

1.  Turning the Prayer Wheel


Prayer Wheel, Circling Arms, Turning the Prayer Wheel

[I will provide photographs for each of the nine movements before September of 2012.]

Step out with the left foot to the diagonal (45 to the left side). 
Step into a high bow stance (a lunge position).  Have about 60% of your weight in the left leg. 
Both feet are kept flat on the floor. 
Root the feet into the ground. 
Both hands are drawn forward to about shoulder height and extended outwards.
The palms face one another and are about 12" apart. 
The hands will move in a clockwise manner in a vertical plane to trace the outline of a circle or prayer wheel.
As the hands move down and towards you, begin to shift the weight backwards by straightening the front left leg.
Breathe in through the nose as the arms come up and towards the body. 
Keep the head about the same height during the shifting of the weight. 
The hands move down and into the waist, then upwards in an arc and back forward.
As the hands move forward the weight is transferred more into the front left leg by bending the left leg. 
Breath out through the mouth as the arms move out and down. 
Soften, relax (Sung), and open the body. 
Watch the hands moving with your eyes. 
Do 6 to 9 circles with the hands as the weight shifts back and forth. 
Return to the Wuji position

Repeat the exercise movement to the right side.
Step out with the right foot to the diagonal (45 to the right side). 
Step into a high bow stance (a lunge position). 
Repeat all of the movements described above for the left side. 
The hands will move in a clockwise manner in a vertical plane to trace the outline of a circle or prayer wheel.
The weight will shift from the front leg to the back leg as the arm move into the body.
The weight will shift from the back leg to the front leg as the arms move up and out from the body. 
Do 6 to 9 circles with the hands as the weight shifts back and forth. 

Return to the Wuji position


I tend to begin each Qigong exercise on the left side, then move to the right side.  I think this is an arbitrary decision.  Most Taijiquan forms begin by stepping out with the right foot to the left side, so moving to the left at first is a habit I've formed. 


This exercise is called "Merging Heaven and Earth" by Daniel Reid in his book A Complete Guide to Chi-Gung, p. 235+.  This book includes a complete description and illustration of this exercise movement.  Daniel Reid has the exercise done in the horse stance.  This sequence is also found in the opening moving of the Yang style Tai Chi Chuan.    


"This exercise balances Yin and Yang, merges Heaven and Earth, and fuses Fire and Water, establishing polar equilibrium within the energy system.  Terrestrial energy is drawn up through the energy gates in the soles and palms, while celestial energy is drawn down from the crown.  The two merge and fuse at the chest on a completion of inhalation and are packed down into the 'Sea of Energy' in the lower elixir field on exhalation." 
-  Daniel Reid, p. 236


It should be noted that traditional Chinese medicine does not ascribe to the same views on anatomy, physiology, or causation that are used in contemporary scientific bio-medical theories.  The "Spleen Organ" or "Heart Organ" in traditional Chinese medicine have functions and attributes of a somewhat different nature than we might understand the heart or spleen in contemporary scientific anatomy and physiology.  For an excellent explanation of these concepts please read the book The Web That Has No Weaver: Understanding Chinese Medicine, by Ted J. Kaptchuk, O.M.D..  


"The first exercise is know as the prayer wheel.  In this one exercise, the whole body is toned.  It invigorates the four systems: the vascular, the lymphatic, the nervous and the chi systems."
-  Marshall Ho'o


"Imagine you have a wheel in front of you, your hands touching either side of the outer edge.  As you move your hands out in a circular path, follow the wheel until your hands return back to the original position.  Never extend your knee beyond your toes.  According to Tai Chi belief, the prayer wheel exercise tones the whole body.  For this reason, it is the first of the nine temple exercises.  Practice the exercises slowly and without tension to increase the flow of "chi," or life energy.  The results will calm the mind and benefit mental health."
-    How to Perform the Prayer Wheel Exercise in T'ai Chi 


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2.  Rotating the Knees

Keep feet together and stay balanced.  
Bend from the waist and let both arms down to the knees.
Place the palms on the kneecaps.  
The back is kept fairly straight. 
Rotate the knees clockwise in a circle.  
Rotate the knees slowly and in a small circle.
Rotate the knees in a circle 9 times.
Breathe in through the nose and out through the mouth.
Return slowly to a resting position.

Bend from the waist and let both arms down to the knees.
Place the palms on the kneecaps.
The back is kept fairly straight.    
Rotate the knees counter-clockwise in a circle.  
Rotate the knees slowly and in a small circle.
Repeat 9 times.
Return slowly to a resting position.

Return to Wuji.


How to Perform a Knee Rotation Exercise in T'ai Chi.  Description, 28Kb.  


Rotating the knees or circling the knees is a widespread warm up exercise in martial arts and kung fu.  For example, look at
"The Shaolin Workout: 28 Days to Transforming Your Body and Soul the Warrior's Way" by Sifu Shi Yan Ming, 2006, p. 109.  The Lohan Qigong system include many of the same exercises. 


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3.  Crossed Arm Rotation


Crossed Arm Rotation, Opening Left and Opening Right 


Step out to a shoulder width stance or a horse stance.
Your feet should be pointed forward.
Knees are bent. 
Maintain an upright posture. 
The depth of stance with vary; with a lower stance making for a more intense exercise.  

Lift both arms up to chest height.  
Both arms should be pointed out from each side of the body.
The palms face forward. 
Relax your shoulders and neck.  
Elbows should be slightly bent.
Look to the front.  


Part 1
Exhale as you move the right arm to the front of the body and then to the left side.  
Exhale to a count of 4-6 when moving the arm to slow you down.   
The arm stays at shoulder level height.   
Twist from the waist as you move your right arm to the left side.
Look at your hand as it moves.  
Touch both hands on the left side.
Look at your hands.
Your torso should be facing to the left side.

Inhale as you move your right arm back to the right side.  
Twist from the waist as you move your right arm from side to side.
Look at your hand as it moves.  
Inhale to a count of 4-6 while moving to slow you down.  
Look to the front.
Both arms are now extended out to the sides, at shoulder height, palms forward. 


Part 2
Move the left arm from the left side to the front and then to the right side.
The arm stays at shoulder level height. 
Exhale as you move the left arm from the left side to the right side.
Exhale to a count of 4-6 when moving to slow you down.  
Look at your hand as you move it.  
Twist from the waist as you move your arm to the opposite side.  
Touch both hands on the right side.
Your torso should be facing to the left side.
Look at both hands.

Inhale as you move your left arm back to your left right side.  
Inhale to a count of 4-6 as you move slowly.    
Twist from the waist as you move your left arm from side to side.
Look at your hand as it moves.  
Look to the front.
Both arms are now extended out to the sides, at shoulder height, palms forward. 

Repeat the movement 9 times to each side.    

Return to Wuji  


How to Perform the Crossed Arm Exercise in T'ai Chi.   Description and photos.  34Kb.  


"The crossed arm rotation posture is a challenging stance from which you strike alternatively with one hand and then the other.  This exercise activates the spleen and the kidneys."
-  Marshall Ho'o 


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4.   Picking Fruit


Picking Fruit, Picking Plums, Reaching for the Fruit, Picking Nuts, Picking Peaches 

Step out with the right foot into a shoulder width stance position. 
Raise both hands to the waist as if holding a basket.
Reach up with your left hand and stretch your left arm up as high as you can. 
With a relaxed left hand, imagine grasping and picking a plum from a branch high above your head. 
Stretch the left arm high. 
Bring your left arm down and place the plum in the imaginary basket that you are holding at your waist with your right hand.
Hold the basket with your left hand. 
Reach up with the right hand and stretch your right arm up as high as you can. 
With a relaxed right hand, imagine grasping and picking a plum from a branch high above your head. 
Stretch the right arm high. 
Bring your right arm down and place the plum in the imaginary basket that you are holding at your waist with your left hand.
Return to holding the basket at your waist with your right hand. 
Reach up to pick another plum with your left hand. 
Stretch body upward and reach upward 9 times with the left hand and 9 times with the right hand.   
Keep the feet flat on the floor as you reach upwards. 
Feel the weight increase in your basket of plums.   

Return to Wuji.   


How to Perform a Picking Fruit Exercise in T'ai Chi
.   Description and photos.  34Kb.  


Compare this movement with "Separating Heaven and Earth", Movement 3, of The Eight Section Brocade Chi Kung Set. 


Marshall Ho'o does not bring the arms back down to the waist, just down about 12" inches from maximum upward reach as the other arm reaches upward.  More like climbing up a ladder.   


Lifting the arms high above the head and stretching upward is common in Hatha Yoga.  A common variation of the Mountain Pose (Tadasana) has both arms stretched high above the head. 


"In this exercise imagine that you're picking fruit from a tree.  This is one of the oldest movements of mankind.  We have done this movement throughout a million years of history.  It is a survival practice - searching for food, reaching for something to eat.  This exercise activates the kidneys, the spleen and the pancreas.  These organs are all activated and the joints are lifted.  This is a very important movement.  Simple, very simple to do, but very, very complex insofar as the meridians are concerned."
-  Marshall Ho'o 


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5.   Swinging the Leg


Put the weight into right leg, and step forward with the left foot.    
Lift the left leg up and put the left toes on the floor.
Begin to gently swing the left leg to the front and to the back.
Keep your balance as you swing your left leg back and forth.
The arms just rest at your side, or slightly out from the side if needed for balancing. 
Keep your toes pointed down as you swing your left foot.
Look forward, keep your head up, keep the right leg bent, keep the body still.
Gradually swing the left leg higher in the front and higher in the back.
Swing the leg back and forth 30 or more times.

Return to the resting position.

Put the weight into left leg, and step forward with the right foot.    
Lift the right leg up and put the right toes on the floor.
Begin to gently swing the right leg to the front and to the back.
Keep your balance as you swing your right leg back and forth.
The arms just rest at your side, or slightly out from the side if needed for balancing. 
Keep your right toes pointed down as you swing your right foot.
Look forward, keep your head up, keep the right leg bent, keep the body still.
Gradually swing the right leg higher in the front and higher in the back.
Swing the leg back and forth 30 or more times.

Return to Wuji


This exercise will help improve one's balance since you are standing on one leg.  Extend the arms to the side as much as needed to help you keep your balance. 


In Master Hoo's book, p.29, when the leg swings back it comes up quite high.  It reminds one of the Hatha yoga posture of "Warrior Three" (Virabhadrasana III) or "Balancing Stick."  A variation of this movement is found in the Animal Frolic of the Crane, that I have called "The Sandhill Crane Glides Down to Land Along the Platte River." 


"This exercise helps eliminate indigestion and constipation, and most important of all, it invigorates the reproductive system.  It requires a little warm-up in order to swing the leg way up and so is placed on the latter half of the list of the nine exercises.  Remember, this is a leg swing, not a kick."
-  Marshall Ho'o 


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6.    Leg Bounce    
   

Leg Bounce, Bouncing 100 Times, Jolting the Body, Shaking the Body    

Step forward with the left foot and place the left toes on the floor - a Cat Stance position.
I prefer stepping slightly to the diagonal or left side. 
The right foot is flat on the floor.
Bend the knees. 
Place more weight, 60% to 70% in the back right foot. 
Hands are at the side, palms down, wrists flexed.
Raise the torso up, and then down, repeating the movement many times up to 100 times. 
Keep the body upright and relaxed. 
Gradually increase the speed of the bouncing. 
Breathing is free and as needed. 
Slow the pace and then stop.
Return the left foot back to the right foot.
Rest. 

Step forward with the right foot and place the right toes on the floor - a Cat Stance position.
I prefer stepping slightly to the diagonal or right side. 
The left foot is flat on the floor.
Bend the knees. 
Place more weight, 60% to 70% in the back left foot. 
Hands are at the side, palms down, wrists flexed.
Raise the torso up, and then down, repeating the movement many times up to 100 times or more.   
Keep the body upright and relaxed. 
Gradually increase the speed of the bouncing. 
Breathing is free and as needed. 
Slow the pace and then stop.
Return the right foot back to the left foot.
Rest.

Return to Wuji   


This movement exercises the thighs, calves, and hips; and shakes the inner organs. 


How to Perform the Leg Bounce Exercise in T'ai Chi.   Description and Photos.  32Kb.  


This exercise is the same as "Shaking the Body," Movement 8, of The Eight Section Brocade Chi Kung, as I have described it.  The explanation includes many more comments about the role of shaking and jolting movements in Chi Kung. 


"This exercise invigorates the spine, up and down.  Invigoration of the spine is very important to your health.  Many healing arts are based upon the well-being of the spine [e.g., yoga, chiropractics].  Energy goes all the way up to the post-pituitary and the cortex to affect even the thinking process.  Do this movement for about five minutes and you will feel quite thoroughly invigorated."
-  Marshall Ho'o 


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7.   Retreat and Advance


Retreat and Advance, Moving Back and Moving Forward

 

Qigong Movement Directions

 

A.  Retreating Movement

Step out to shoulder width stance. 
Your feet face forward. 
Place your hands on your hips. 
Face N12

1)
Bend the left knee and sink down a little on the left leg.
Turn your upper torso 90 to the left, and face to your left side.  Face W9. 
Inhale deeply. 
You are now facing to the right side. 
Don't move the legs much as you turn. 
Keep your weight on your left leg as you turn.
Begin to exhale. 
Begin to shift your upper torso to the right side, continue facing W9. 
You are moving your upper torso backwards, retreating towards E3. 
Shift your weight to the right leg and right side.
Bend your right knee and continue facing W9. 

2) 
Begin to inhale. 
Turn your upper torso 180 degrees clockwise to the right side, and face to your right side.
Face towards E3. 
Keep your weight on your bent right leg as you turn your torso clockwise to the right side, E3. 
Begin to exhale. 
Begin to shift your upper torso to the left side, continue facing E3. 
You are moving your upper torso backwards, retreating towards W9. 
Shift your weight to the left leg and the left side.
Bend your left knee and continue facing E3. 
Turn your upper torso 180 degrees clockwise to the left side, and face to your left side.
Face towards W9.   

3) Repeat movement part A 1) and A 2).
Repeat the movement back and forth, from side to side, at least nine times.
Return to the resting position.

 

B.  Advancing Movement

Step out to shoulder width stance. 
Your feet face forward. 
Place your hands on your hips. 
Face N12. 

1)
Bend the left knee and sink down a little on the left leg.
Turn your upper torso 90 to the left, and face to your left side.  Face W9. 
Inhale deeply. 
Turn your upper torso only by 180 to the right.  Face E3. 
You are now facing to the right side, E3.   
Don't move the legs much as you turn. 
Keep your weight on your left leg as you turn.
Begin to exhale. 

2)
Begin to shift the your upper body over to the right side.
Shift your weight to the right leg and right side.
Bend your right knee and face to the right side, Face E3. 
Begin to inhale. 
Turn your upper torso 180 degrees to the left side, and face to your left side, Face W9. 
Keep your weight on your bent right leg as you turn your torso to the left.
Begin to exhale. 
Begin to shift the your upper body over to the left side.  Keep facing W9. 
Shift your weight to the left leg and left side.
Bend your left knee and face to the left side.

3) Repeat movement part B 1) and B 2).
Repeat the movement back and forth, from side to side, at least nine times.
Return to the resting position.

Return to Wuji


The lower the stance the more demanding the exercise.

It takes some practice and adjustments of the legs and feet to learn this two movements.  Move very slowly and gently with this movement if you are a beginner to the form. 

[Again, I will provide photographs for each of the nine movements before September of 2012.] 


"This is what we have to do in life all the time - retreat and advance.  The kidneys, the liver, the spleen, the pancreas, gall bladder, ascending colon, transverse, and descending colon are all set in motion."
-  Marshall Ho'o 


"From a forward facing stance with your feet shoulder-width apart, turn and face your left side while inhaling deeply.  Bend your left knee and sink down a little as your exhale and turn your body 180 degrees to the right side.  Keep your weight on your left leg as you turn.  Shift your weight to the left side as you inhale.  Bend your left knee and sink down a little.  Repeat the back and forth, and side to side movements at least nine times before you return to the resting position.  Your head should face the front of your body at all times and the 180 degree turns should be completed in a count of six."
-   Tai Chi Temple Exercises 


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8.   Grinding Corn


Grinding Corn, Polishing the Stone, Milling Wheat

Step out with the right foot into a horse stance with toes pointed forward.
Bend forward at the waist a little bit.  Don't strain. 
Move your hands to your waist. 
Palms face down.
Touch your index fingers together and you thumbs together to make a triangle.
Circle your hands to the left side and out to the front, to the right and back, in a clockwise manner. 
Inhale as you circle outwards, and exhale as you circle inwards. 
Bend your upper torso down a little as you circle your arms out to the front, like your reaching a little. 
Lift your upper torso upward a little as you return your arms to your waist.
Keep your hands doing a clockwise circular movement at the same level above the floor.    
Do 9 circular movements in a clockwise direction. 
Stop your hands at your waist. 

Begin 9 circular movement in a counter-clockwise direction. 
Circle your hands to the right side and out to the front, to the left side and back, in a counter-clockwise manner. 
Inhale as you circle outwards, and exhale as you circle inwards. 
Bend you upper torso down a little as you circle your arms out to the front, like your reaching a little.
Lift your upper torso upward a little as you return your arms to your waist.
Keep the your hands doing a counter-clockwise circular movement at the same level above the floor.    
Do 9 circular movements in a clockwise direction. 
Stop your hands at your waist. 

Return to Wuji

 

Marshall Ho'o instructs you to bend your knees quite a bit in a squat, and bring both hands to the level of your knees.  You then make the circles in both directions keeping your hands at knee level.  I do this exercise with my hands circling at the level of my waist or hips.  The lower you go in your squat and the closer your hands are to the floor the more challenging this exercise becomes.  If you have any low back pain or issues, be careful about bending forward too deeply and keep the hands at a level above the hips.   


The movement in this form is similar to the initial movement of Kai Gong Shi (Bow and Arrow) found in Instant Health: The Shaolin Workout for Longevity by Shifu Yan Lei, p. 154-155.  Also, look at this movement, done in a bow or lunge stance, in the Magic Pearl Qigong set, movement #3, "The Magic Pearl Glows in the Moonlight" done with a Tai Chi ball or medicine ball. 


How to Perform a Grinding the Corn Exercise in T'ai Chi.  Description and Photos.  36Kb.  


"In this exercise imagine there's a stone table in front of you which comes up to the height of your knees.  The stone table is a place where you will grind cereal.  Imagine further that you are holding two bricks, one in each hand, and with them you are grinding corn on the table."
-  Marshall Ho'o 


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9.   Polishing the Mirror



Polishing the Mirror, Washing the Walls, Wax On and Wax Off

1)
Step out with the right foot into a shoulder width or wider horse stance.
The toes are pointed forward. 
Draw both hands up the center of the body, with the hands about 6" apart.
Lift the hands above the head. 
The palms face forward and the wrists are flexed. 
Begin to separate the hands and circle them downwards.
When the arms are at about shoulder level both arms should be spread out to the sides. 
Continue moving the arms downward.
As the arms reach the waist level begin to bend your knees.
Continue squatting as the arms move down.
Keep the back relatively straight as you bend slightly at the waist.
Squat down as low as you can safely. 
The depth of the squatting position will vary from person to person. 
As you being to rise back up, draw both hands to the center. 
The hands are less than shoulder width apart as you rise up.
Draw the hands up above the head. 
The arms are making a circular pattern: arching outward and downward.
Return to 1) and repeat the exercise 9 times. 
Stop and rest for a moment. 

2)
Draw both hands up the center of the body, with the hands about 6" apart.
Lift the hands above the head. 
The palms face forward and the wrists are flexed. 
Draw both hands down the centerline of the body.
The hands are less than shoulder width apart. 
Continue moving both hands downward.
As the arms reach the waist level begin to bend your knees.
Continue squatting as the arms move down.
Keep the back relatively straight as you bend slightly at the waist.
Squat down as low as you can safely. 
The depth of the squatting position will vary from person to person. 
As you being to rise back up, draw both hands outward to the sides. 
Draw the hands upwards in an arc. 
The arms are making a circular pattern: arching outward and upward.
As the hands reach shoulder level and you are standing straight up, begin to draw the hands together.
When the arms at fully extended upwards the hands are close together again. 
Return to 2) and repeat the exercise 9 times. 
Stop and rest for a moment. 


Return to Wuji


The woman in Master Hoo's book who demonstrates this movement squats very deeply.  Her hips are lower than her knees and her palms are level with her knees.  This very low squat may be dangerous for the knees of some people.  Be careful! 


Some kind of squatting movements are essential to strength training and are found in all exercise, Yoga, and Qigong routines.  Bringing the arms out from the body as you squat may help with balance in #9, 1) above. 


How to Perform a Polishing the Mirror Exercise in T'ai Chi.  Description and Photos.  31Kb.


"For this exercise, you should imagine that you are polishing a large round mirror. Your feet should be facing forward about shoulder-width apart. Raise your arms to just above your head with your palms facing forward. Move your hands apart as you "polish" the mirror. Your left hand should move to the left and your right hand to the right in a circular fashion. Slowly lower your body into a deep squat while keeping your back straight as you continue to polish with your hands. At the bottom of the movement, bring your hands together and slowly rise to the starting position. Repeat the exercise nine times."
Tai Chi Temple Exercises 


"This exercise has a tremendous effect on the lower back, on the backs of the knees, which are rarely exercised, and on the inside of the thighs.  Many martial artists work the exterior muscles but do not exercise the interior muscles of the thighs.  This exercise is good for the kidneys.  Do this exercise and you won't get hemorrhoids."
-  Marshall Ho'o 


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Closure

Assume standing position and take a few cleansing breaths.
Do some self massage
Stand in Wuji posture for awhile. 
Practice Taijiquan 
Practice other Qigong Forms. 
Take a walk
Practice two of the six healing sounds
Do some reading
Do some meditation


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Links and References
Temple Chi Kung

 

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Animal Frolics Qigong  


Chen Style Taijiquan 


Chi Kung (Qigong) Bibliography, Links, Resources


The Complete Guide to Chi-Gung: Harnessing the Power of the Universe.    By Daniel Reid.  Illustrations by Dexter Chou.   Boston, Shambhala, 1998.  Appendix, index, 326 pages.  ISBN: 1570625433.  VSCL.    


Daoist Nei Gong: The Philosophical Art of Change  By Damo Mitchell.  Singing Dragon, 2011.  240 pages.  ISBN: 978-1848190658.  VSCL. 


Dragon Qigong


Eight Section Brocade Chi Kung    Eight Treasures Qigong, Ba Duan Jin Chi Kung.   By Michael P. Garofalo.   Instructions, lessons, notes, links, bibliography, quotations, and charts.    


Eighteen Hands Lohan Qigong (King Mui Version)  Description and photographs. 


Five Elements Chi Kung 


The Healing Promise of Qi: Creating Extraordinary Wellness Through Qigong and Tai Chi.  By Roger Jahnke, O.M.D..  Chicago, Contemporary Books, 2002.   Index, notes, extensive recommended reading list, 316 pages.  ISBN: 0809295288.
  VSCL. 


Healing Sounds Chi Kung 

 

 

Grand Master Marshall Ho'o, 1910-1993

 

Grand Master Marshall Hoo          Grand Master Marshall Hoo          Grand Master Marshall Hoo          Grand Master Marshall Hoo  

 

"Dr. Ho'o was instrumental in the certification of acupuncture in the State of California. He was the first Tai Chi Master to have been elected to the Black Belt Hall of Fame.  He was Dean of the Aspen Academy of Martial & Healing Arts, on the faculty of California Institute of the Arts, and taught Tai Chi and Acupressure at many educational institutions.  In 1973, he created a series for KCET public television, in Los Angeles, teaching Tai Chi.  He was a consultant to Prevention Magazine's The Doctor's Book of Home Remedies.  A Chinese American, Dr. Ho'o was America's first Tai Chi Chuan Grandmaster.  His influence is far-reaching in both the fields of healing and martial arts."
The Lineage, Teachers of Two Birds Tai Chi


Tai Chi Chuan  By Marshall Ho'o.  Burbank, California, Ohara Publications, Inc., 1986.  111 pages.  Black Belt Magazine Publication.  ISBN: 0897501098.  VSCL.  The Nine Temple exercise set is briefly described in this book on pages 18-42.  Each movement is clearly illustrated by four to eight clear black and white photographs of a woman doing the form.  The Taijiquan explained and illustrated in this book, with mediocre and grainy black and white photographs, is the Standard 24 Form of Taijiquan in the Yang Style.  I think it is the first book on the 24 Form in the English language. 


Tai Chi Chuan: The 27 forms by Marshall Ho'o.   Instructional DVD, released in 2005, by Marshall Ho'o.  Black Belt Videos, 90 minutes.  Includes the Nine Temple Qigong.   


History of Tai Chi Chuan Masters by Master Lawrence Karol


 


How to Perform the Nine Temple Exercises in T'ai Chi.   Each exercise is described, and photographs of movement are also included.  From E-Hows.   The descriptions on E-Hows webpages differs slightly from the presentation on this webpage.  


Instant Health: The Shaolin Workout for Longevity.  By Shifu Yan Lei.  Yan Lei Press, U.K., 2009.  227 pages.  ISBN: 0956310109.  The author also offers instructional DVDs; The Shaolin Warrior, the Way of Qi Gong.  An oversize book with color photos by Manuel Vason.  Includes theory, stances, stretches, routines, and a Shaolin version of the Ba Duan Jin.  VSCL. 


Lohan Chi Kung, Shaolin Chi Kung


Magic Pearl Qigong 


Marshall Ho Temple Exercises


Knocking at the Gate of Life and Other Healing Exercises from China.   Official Manual of the People's Republic of China.   Translated by Edward C. Chang.    Pennsylvania, Rodale Press, 1985. Index, 202 pages.  ISBN:  0878575820.  VSCL. 


Nine Temple Exercises


Nine Temple Chi Kung, Temple Qigong, Marshall Ho's Temple Chi Kung


Qigong Bibliography, Links, Resources


Qigong (Chi Kung) - Red Bluff, California 


Qigong Empowerment: A Guide to Medical, Taoist, Buddhist, and Wushu Energy Cultivation.   By Liang, Shou-Yu and Wu, Wen-Ching.  Edited by Denise Breiter-Wu.  Rhode Island, Way of the Dragon Publishing, 1997.  Index, glossary, 348 pages.  ISBN: 1889659029.


Qi Gong for Beginners: Eight Easy Movements for Vibrant Health.   By Stanley D. Wilson.  Photographs by Barry Kaplan.  Sterling Publications, 1997.   148 pages.   ISBN: 0915801752.   VSCL. 


Relaxation (Sung) in Qigong and Taijiquan


The Root of Chinese Chi Kung: The Secrets of Chi Kung Training.  By Yang Jwing-Ming.  YMAA Chi Kung Series #1.   Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, Yang's Martial Arts Association, 1989.  Glossary, 272 pages.   ISBN: 0940871076.  VSCL.    


Rooting and Centering in Qigong and Taijiquan 


Shaolin Chi Kung 


The Shaolin Workout: 28 Days to Transforming Your Body and Soul the Warrior's Way.  By Sifu Shi Yan Ming. Rodale Press, 2006. Index, 293 pages. ISBN: 1594864004.  VSCL. 


Shibashi Chi Kung 


Simple Fitness Exercises : Traditional Chinese Movements for Health & Rejuvenation.  By Jiawen Miao.   Llewellyn Publications, 2000.   111 pages.  ISBN: 1567184952.  VSCL. 


Tai Chi Temple Exercises  By Robin Jagoda. 


The Tao of Tai-Chi Chuan:  Way to Rejuvenation.   By Jou, Tsung, Hwa.   Edited by Shoshana Shapiro.  Warwick, New York, Tai Chi Foundation, 1980.  263 pages.  First Edition.  ISBN: 0804813574.  Excellent textbook.  A Third Edition is now available.  VSCL. 


Temple Ch'i Kung.   By Michael P. Garofalo.    


Valley Spirit Qigong, Red Bluff, California


VSCL =  Valley Spirit Center Library Collection, Red Bluff, California


The Way of Energy: Mastering the Chinese Art of Internal Strength with Chi Kung Exercise.   By Master Lam Kam Chen.  New York, Fireside, Simon and Schuster, 1991.  A Gaia Original.  Index, 191 pages.  ISBN: 0671736450.  VSCL. 


The Way of Qigong: The Art and Science of Chinese Energy Healing.  By Kenneth S. Cohen.  Foreword by Larry Dossey.  New York Ballantine Books, 1997.  Index, notes, appendices, 427 pages.  ISBN: 0345421094.  One of my favorite books: comprehensive, informative, practical, and scientific.  VSCL. 

 

                                              

 

Wudang Qigong 


Yang Style Taijiquan


Yang Style Taijiquan, Short Form, Peking Version, 24 Movements.   By Michael P. Garofalo.  List of movements, links, bibliography, quotations.  


Yi Jin Jing Qigong: Muscle Tendon Changing Qigong


 

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Waving Hands Like Clouds Homepage

 

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Red Bluff, Tehama County, North Sacramento Valley, Northern California, U.S.A.
Cities in the area: Sacramento, Yuba City, Marysville, Oroville, Williams, Willows, Paradise, Durham, Chico,
Hamilton City, Orland, Corning, Rancho Tehama, Los Molinos, Tehama, Gerber, Red Bluff, Manton, Cottonwood, 
Anderson, Shasta Lake, Palo Cedro, and Redding, CA

Come to Red Bluff and take a weekend Tai Chi or Qigong Workshop or Private Lessons with Mike Garofalo.

Disclaimer

Valley Spirit Qigong, Green Way Research, Red Bluff, California, 2003-2012
By Michael P. Garofalo, M.S., All Rights Reserved.
 

The information on this webpage was first posted on the Internet in August 2003. 

In January, 2007, this webpage was moved to its present URL. 

This webpage was last updated on March 19, 2012

 

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Vacation and Learn in Beautiful Red Bluff, California

Beginning T'ai Chi Ch'uan Options:  Yang 24, Chen 18, Sun 24, Cane 18

Beginning Chi Kung (Qigong) Options: Five Animal Frolics, Eight Brocades , Daoist Temple, Magic Pearl, Yoga

Valley Spirit Center


Lectures, Private Lessons, Classes, Consulting, Workshops, Questions and Answers

Reasonable Hourly Rates

Instructor:  Michael P. Garofalo, M.S.

Excellent Recreational Opportunities for Persons of All Ages in the North Sacramento Valley
The Perfect Weekend Getaway for You, Friends and Family
Beautiful Scenery, Pleasant Weather, and Clear Skies for the Outdoor Enthusiast
Activities: Sight Seeing, Bicycling, Walking, Shopping, Spas, Reading, Relaxing, Internal Arts Studies
The Valley Spirit Center includes extensive gardens for Tai Chi practice and a Sacred Circle
A Full Array of Services and Excellent and Reasonably Priced Accommodations in Redding or Red Bluff

Contact Mike: Email or Phone 530-200-3546

My Daily Tai Chi Chuan and Chi Kung Training Program

 

 

                          

 

Cloud Hands Blog

 

 

 

 

Pulling Onions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photographs around the Valley Spirit Center near the City of Red Bluff

in the North Sacramento Valley Area, California

 

Study with Mike Garofalo

 

Cloud Hands Blog