Yi Jin Jing Qigong

Muscle and Tendon Changing Qigong
Muscle/Sinew Transforming Classic, Chinese Health Exercises (Daoyin, Chi Kung)

Bibliography     Links     Names of Movements     Quotations     Instructions
 

 

Research by Michael P. Garofalo

January 27, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bibliography, Links, Resources
Yi Jin Jing: Muscle and Tendon Changing Qigong

 

 

"Toughen my sinews, harden my bones,
Make my blood flow freely,
I will then be young forever
In touch with the realm of gods."
Canon of the Great Void 

 

Animal Frolics Qigong  


Bear Frolic


Beginning Qigong: Chinese Secrets for Health and Longevity.  By Stephen Comee.   Tokyo, Tuttle Publishing, 1993.  120 pages.  ISBN:0804817219.  VSCL.  The Yi Jin Jing is described on pp. 28-56. 


Book of Scripture of the Yi Jin Jing  

 

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Cane, Short Staff, Walking Stick


Chi Kung: Bibliography, Links, Quotations, Resources, Lessons  


Chinese Healing Arts: Internal Kung Fu.  Edited by William R. Berk.  All translations by the nineteenth century physician, Dr. John Dudgeon.  Burbank, CA, Unique Publications, 1986.  209 pages.  ISBN: 0865680833.  Includes numerous translations of classic works.  A translation of the Yi Jin Jing with illustrations, called "The Twelve Deva Postions" is found on pp. 165-177.  VSCL. 


Chinese Healing Exercises: The Tradition of Daoyin.  By Livia Kohn.  University of Hawaii Press, 2008.  268 pages.  ISBN:
0824832698.  History of Daoist health practices.


“Chinese Qigong Outgoing Qi Therapy,” Bi Yoncheng.


Cloud Hands Blog


Cloud Hands Website:  Taijiquan and Qigong    Index 


Crane Frolic


Da Me Yi Yin Jing.  Instructional DVD or VHS, 112 minutes.  Instruction by Shifu Jiang Jian-ye.  "An exercise routine good for beginners and seniors, it was used by monks at the famous Shaolin Temple, founded by Da Me (Mo), as an internal and external exercise to balance sitting meditation. There are 12 forms involving arms, legs, chest, stomach, waist and back, mobilizing every part of the body. Helps to open qi channels and boost energy and increase longevity. There is a set of warm up and stretching exercises followed by step-by-step teaching at slow speed with multiple views." 


Deer Frolic


Dragon Qigong


Eight Section Brocade (Ba Duan Jin) Qigong  


Exercises with a Cane or Short Staff


"Exercises Illustrated: Ancient Way to Keep Fit."  Compiled by Zhong Wu and Li Mao. 


Five Animal Frolics Qigong   Bibliography, Lessons, Links, Resources, Quotations, History


Five Steps for Learning Yi Jin Jing 


14 Series Sinew-Transforming Exercises.  Compiled by Chang Weizhen.  English Translation by Hong Yunxi.  Foreign Languages Press, Beijing, 1991.  Paperback, 117 pages.  ISBN 7119006363.


Green Paths in the Valley Blog 


"Illustration Exposition of Internal Techniques."   Published by Wang Zuyuan (1828-1890).  Shaolin Temple exercise techniques.  Pan Weiru, 1858, "Essential Techniques for Guarding Life."


Integral Life Practices: A 21st Century Blueprint for Physical Health, Emotional Balance, Mental Clarity, and Spiritual Awakening.  By Ken Wibur, Terry Patten, Adam Leonard, and Marco Morelli.  Integral Books, 2008.  Index, 416 pages.  ISBN: 1590304675.  VSCL. 


Index to the Cloud Hands Website 


Internal Arts of the Shaolin Temple: An Ancient Guide to Inner Strength and Health.  By Ted Knecht.


Instant Health: The Shaolin Workout for Longevity.  By Shifu Yan Lei.  Yan Lei Press, U.K., 2009.  227 pages.  ISBN: 0956310109.  The author also offers instructional DVDs; The Shaolin Warrior, the Way of Qi Gong.  An oversize book with color photos by Manuel Vason.  Includes theory, stances, stretches, routines, and a Shaolin version of the Ba Duan Jin.  VSCL. 


Introduction to Yi Jin Jing.  By Dave Chesser, Formosa Neijia


Is Yi Jin Jing a Sutra or chi Kung Exercise?   By Wong Kiew Kit. 


“Knocking at the Gate of Life and other Healing Exercises from China,” Official Manual of the People’s Republic of China.


Magic Pearl Qigong: A Tai Chi Medicine Ball Exercise Routine and Meditation Technique.  Developed by Mike Garofalo. 

Magic Pearl Qigong


Massage: Links, Bibliography, Quotes, Notes   By Mike Garofalo. 


Monkey Frolic


Muscle/Tendon Changing and Marrow/Bone Washing Chi Kung.  The Secret of Youth.  By Yang, Jwing Ming, Ph.D., 1946-.  Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, Yang's Martial Arts Association, 1989.  Glossary, 286 pages.  ISBN: 0940871068.


Muscle/Tendon Changing Qigong (Yi Jin Jing Qigong): Bibliography, Links, Resources, Lessons.   By Mike Garofalo. 


Muscle/Tendon Changing Qi Gong.   Sifu Scott Jensen, San Francisco. 


Muscle and Tendon Transforming Qigong Practice with a Cane, Mike Garofalo's Version of Yi Jin Jing


Names of the Yi Jin Jing Movements/Routines   


100 Days to Better Health, Good Sex and Long Life.   By Eric Yudelove. 


Practice Tips of Yi Jin Jing 


Qigong: Bibliography, Links, Resources, Lessons   By Mike Garofalo. 


Qigong Essentials: Yin Jin Ching.  Instructional DVD, 81 minutes from Tai Chi Healthways, San Diego, California.  Instruction by Master Jesse Tsao.  "Yi Jin Ching (Tendon Transforming Classic) is a 1500-year-old Qigong practice that originated in the Shaolin Temple.  It was regarded as a secret of great value in ancient times.  The whole set of postures provides fitness and wellness conditioning for the body.  It is intended to build flexibility and strength in tendons and muscles through progressive stretching and releasing cycles, while stimulating inner energy flow for healing and disease prevention.  Its long existence and adoption by a diverse collection of masters has lead to many variations - Master Jesse Tsao presents the most complete set, practiced in the Beijing area, and explains each posture's healing benefits based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).  He also includes an adopted version of Yi Jin Ching on the chair.  Detailed instructions are given in English with front and back views.  It is a good reference for home study, or a resource for instructor's teaching preparation." 


Qigong Martial Arts Origins 


Qigong Meditation: Embroyonic Breathing.   By Yang, Jwing-Ming.  Boston, Mass., YMAA Publications, 2003.  Index, glossary, 389 pages.  ISBN: 1886969736.  VSCL. 


Qigong: The Secret of Youth: Da Mo's Muscle/Tendon Changing and Marrow Brain Washing Classics.   By Yang, Jwing-Ming, Ph.D., 1946-.  An Advanced Qigong Regimen for the Serious Practitioner.  Boston, Massachusetts, YMAA Publication Center, 2000.  Second Edition 2000, First Edition 1989.  Index, appendices, charts, 312 pages.  ISBN: 1886969841.  VSCL. 


Qigong: Yi Jin Jing (Ching) Chi Kung.  UTube Video, 7:20.  Demonstration by Master Jesse Tsao. 


The Root of Chinese Chi Kung: The Secrets of Chi Kung Training.  By Yang, Jwing-Ming, Ph.D., 1946-.  YMAA Chi Kung Series #1.   Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, Yang's Martial Arts Association, 1989.  Glossary, charts, 272 pages.   ISBN: 0940871076.  VSCL.       


Shaolin Arts.  By Jin Jing Zhong.


Shaolin Buddhist Qigong: Shujintu Yuke Huishan.  "A free sample qigong/chi k'ung exercise from the Shaolin/Buddhist system of qigong, Damo Yijin-jing ("Bodhidharma's Tendon-changing Classic") Order DVDs online at www.kungfuloung.com.tw. English subtitles coming soon."  UTube Video, 2:55 minutes.  There are a series of UTube Videos. 


Shaolin Da-Mo's Yi Jin Jing   "Sutra di Bodhidharma per il mutamento di tendini e muscoli.  Lavoro Esterno by Radha Priya Dasi Sri Rohininandana Das.  Paperback, 2009. 


A Shaolin Hero in America: The Fighting Monk Shi Yan-Ming.  Kung Fu Magazine. 


Shaolin Monastery 


 

 

                                

    

 

Shaolin Muscle Tendon Change Classic.  Instructional DVD by Shaolin Monk Shi Deqian.  Includes a wall chart of movements.  Vendor 1   Vendor 2  


Shaolin Qi Gong: Energy in Motion.  By Shi Xinggui.  In collaboration with Eleonore Yogl.  Translated by Ariel Godwin.  Rochester, Vermont, Destiny Books, 2007.  153 pages.  Includes a 53 minute instructional DVD.  ISBN: 9781594772641.  VSCL. 


Shaolin Yi Jin Jing - Google Search


Shaolin Yi Jin Jing Muscle Tendon Changing Classic.  UTube Video, 10:00 minutes. 


Six Taoist Healing Sounds   Research by Mike Garofalo. 


The Spiritual Legacy of Shaolin Temple: Buddhism, Daoism, and the Energetic Arts.  By Andy James.  Paperback, 2005.    


Taoist Yi Jin Jing - Google Search  


Tiger Frolic 


The Twelve Positions From "Kung-Fu, or Tauist Medical Gymnastics," by John Dudgeon, 1895. 


Walking: Quotations, Bibliography, Exercise Routines 


Walking Version of Yi Jin Jing   By Mike Garofalo. 


Way of the Short Staff 


Ways of Walking


Wu Qin Xi, Five Animal Frolics Qigong


“Wushu Exercises for Life Enhancement,” Yu Gongbao.


Yi Jin Jing.  Rochester Chen Style Taijiquan.


Yi Jin Jing.  UTube Video, 7:20 minutes. 


Yi Jin Jing.  Instructional DVD by Master Wang Hai Ying. 


Yijinjing.  UTube Video, 6:20 minutes. 


Yi Jin Jing: Book of Scripture of the Changing Tendon   By General Li Jing. 


Yi Jin Jing: Chinese Health Qigong.  Compiled by the Chinese Health Qigong Association.  Beijing, China, Foreign Languages Press, 2007.  95 pages, charts, includes an instructional DVD.  ISBN: 9787119047782.  VSCL.  "Qigong is an aspect of traditional Chinese medicine that involves coordinating breathing patterns with physical postures to maintain health and well-being. Yi Jin Jing/ Tendon-Muscle Strengthening Exercises is an accessible, fully-illustrated guide to a particular qigong exercise that focuses on turning and flexing the spine.  Based on the twelve traditional routines of Yi Jin Jing, the exercises covered in the book feature soft, extended, even movements that invigorate the limbs and internal organs. In particular, practice of the Yi Jin Jing exercises improves flexibility, balance and muscular strength, and has a beneficial effect on the respiratory system. Each routine is described step-by-step and is illustrated with photographs and key points. The authors also point out common mistakes and offer advice on how to correct these.  Complemented by an appendix of acupuncture points and accompanied by a DVD, this book will be of interest to Qigong and Tai Chi practitioners at all levels, students of martial arts and anyone interested in Chinese culture." - Singing Dragon


Yi Jin Jing Exercises.  Exercises 1-3, Exercises 4-5, Exercises 6-7, .... 


Yi Jin Jing 49 Postures Discussion


Yi Jin Jing: Muscle and Tendon Limbering Exercises.  Ancient Chinese Exercise for Health and Longevity.  Instruction from Master Tan Lai Wei.  Instructional DVD, 36 minutes.  Qi Productions. 


Yi Jin Jing - Names of the Movements/Routines


Yi Jin Jing Qigong (Muscle/Tendon Changing Qigong): Bibliography, Links, Resources, Lessons.   By Mike Garofalo. 


Yi Jin Jing: Taoist and Buddhist Influences 


Yi Jin Jing: Walking Version   By Mike Garofalo. 


Yi Jin Jing - Wikipedia

 

 

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Quotations

 

 

"The basic purpose of Yijinjing is to turn flaccid and frail sinews and tendons into strong and sturdy ones. The movements of Yijinjing are at once vigorous and gentle. Their performance calls for a unity of will and strength, i.e. using one’s will to direct the exertion of muscular strength. It is coordinated with breathing. Better muscles and tendons means better health and shape, more resistance, flexibility, endurance, and is obtained as follows:

Power and endurance are of paramount importance if we look at becoming qualified in whatever practice we choose, be it Tuina, martial arts, or simply better health and wisdom. Already another known Qigong system, Baduanjin, in its more radical and strong forms was used in the past from schools of Xingyiquan and Taijiquan as bodily preparation to fighting arts, in order to make body strong and flexible. Baduanjin still remains the first, entry-level routine to learn at Shaolin training schools in Song Mountains. We can still see today Japanese Kata like Sanchin, postures and forms like Siunimtao in Wingchung, “Iron thread” in Hung Gar and all sorts of Neigong in Neijia. Martial artists need to be powerful in the martial practice, like non-martial people need to be healthy. But there is also something supple and flexible inside of Yijinjing. Movements are energetic and intense, but you can see through a kind of peace. Yijinjing unifies in fact Yi (intention) with Li (strength), consciousness (yang) with muscular force (yin). The mind is free from thoughts, has a correct and well-disposed attitude, the breathing is harmonious. Internal and external movement must be coordinated, like movement with relaxation. Externally must be fortification; inside must be purification; unifying matter and spirit.

Some classic recurring points of Yijinjing can be described as follows: - Most of the movements use open palms, fists are used only for stretching the tendons. - The name of exercises changes, but often the basic idea of movement remains the same. I.e. Wei Tuo greets and offers something (Nanjing Ac. of Tuina); Wei Tuo offers gifts to the sky (Liu Dong); General Skanda holds the Cudgel (Zong Wu-Li Mao). - Movements are done standing, sometimes bending forward, but never lying or sitting. - Eyes are always open, never closed. - Movements are slow but full and tensed, face and body shows relaxed attitude. - All directions of the upper body section (especially shoulders) are active and moved. - Dynamic tension rules the moves. - All parts of the body works together. - There are different ways of practicing the same Yijinjing form, according to the basic rules, to the body shape, to the time of practice and to the general health conditions.

According to traditional verbal formulas, we have that: - The first year of training gives back physical and mental vitality - The second year enhances blood circulation and nurtures meridians - The third year allows flexibility to muscles and nurtures the organs - The forth year meridians are better and viscera are nurtured - The fifth year the marrow is washed and the brain is nurtured

The Five rules of Yijinjing are: - Quietness Like lake water reflects the moon, a calm spirit allows energy to move inside the body - Slowness In order to use and flex muscles deeply, to get maximum extension and move Qi and Xue, slow movements are required - Extension Each movement must be brought to the maximum - Pause Efficacy comes through waiting and keeping tension for longer time - Flexibility Limbs and trunk must be extended so that blood and energy can circulate, so we have flexibility.

Breathing in Yijinjing is a controversial point. Modern sources insist on a deep, forced, reverse breathing in order to develop power. Other sources, and among them Robert W. Smith, in his article on the J.A.M.A. in 1996, suggest that there are differences between the northern and the southern way of breath. The southern systems seem not to have a deep understanding and good use of breathing and working on Qi as energy. In his work on “Breathing in Taiji and other fighting arts”, Smith analyses not only Taiji veterans and classics, but also known fighters out of his personal experience, and invariably the right kind of breathing, be it for martial or for health purposes, is located between classic abdominal breathing and a slow, unconscious breathing, where there is place for sudden explosions, typical of martial arts and hard blows."
-   Yi Jin Jing - Wikipedia

 

 

"The Changing Tendons Exercise (Yi Jin Jing) is another form of exercise handed down from ancient times. In Chinese yi means change, jin means "tendons and sinews", while jing means "methods". This is a relatively intense form of exercise that aims at strengthening the muscles and tendons , so promoting strength and flexibility, speed and stamina, balance and coordination of the body.  This exercise pays great attention to the coordination of movements, respiration and mind so as to guarantee that qi circulates freely and smoothly.  As with most exercises, there is an enormous variety in form, the most popular being the "12-postures of Changing Tendons" devised by Pan Wei in the Qing dynasty (AD 1644-1911)." 
Changing Tendons Exercise  

 

 

"The Essence of Yi Jin Jing:  The Yi Jin Jing exercises are a form of wai dan (external chi developing) qigong that uses yi, focused intent and visualization to develop local chi and increase chi circulation.
This later evolved into the Lohan Shi-Ba Zhang (18 Priest-Scholar Palms) Martial Arts that formed the foundation of Chinese temple boxing and Shaolin arts.  In Chinese medicine, tendons generally represent meridians or pathways for the energy to flow. Marrow refers to the heart.  Hence, Yi Jin Jing refers to changing tendons or opening up the channels throughout the body and cleansing them of all blockages. Once the blockages are removed the chi can then flow naturally and health is restored.  With regular practice of the Yi Jin Jing, the practitioner can not only maintain good health but can also develop a strong immunity against almost any form of disease and even deterioration due to age.  This is the origin of Da Mo Qigong. This internal art is still practiced today, but it has developed into a set of exercises designed for health maintenance and to treat chronic disease, in addition to promoting its original goal of meditation and enlightenment."
Qigong

 

 

"Muscle-Tendon Changing (chin.: Yi Jin Jing 易筋经) is one of the Venerable Bodhidharma’s timeless teachings and have been considered the key to long-lasting youth. The term Yijinjing can be translated also as regeneration of the Body and Tendon-Transformation and Marrow-Purification method.  Bodhidharma’s Yi Jin Jing is one of the most well kept Martial Arts (chin. wugōng 武功)technique of the Songshan Shaolin Monastery (chin.: Sōngshān Shàolínsì 嵩山少林寺). Practicing Bodhidharma’s Yi Jin Jing improve the external strength (chin.: Jìn 劲) of the body but also the body flexibility (chin.: róuxìng 柔性.)   The Yi Jin Jing taught the Shaolin Monks (chin.: Shàolínsēng 少林僧) how to build their internal energy (chin.: qi 气) to an abundant level and use it to improve health and change their physical bodies from weak to strong. After the Monks practiced the Yi Jin Jing exercises, they found that not only did they improve their health, but also they also greatly increased their strength. When this training was integrated into the martial arts forms, it increased their martial abilities. This change marked one more step in the growth of the Shaolin Martial Arts (chin.: Shàolín wugōng 少林武功.)"
Yi Jin Jing   

 

 

"Yi Jin Jing should be practiced with a relaxed spirit and a peaceful mind. Practitioners do not have to particularly initiate movements by the mind or focus on the intended parts of the body. Rather, the mind follows the movements, and should be coordinated with the circulation of Qi with the body's movements.  Gentle and easy breathing without any gasping or obstruction is required to relax the spirit and body, make the mind peaceful and coordinate the body's motions. Noisy breathing, gasping and distorted nostrils tend to upset the mind, disturb the balance and make the movements uncoordinated.  The softness and toughness of the exercise movements interchange throughout the practice. When stretched or relaxed, they display a dialectical relationship of a unity of opposites, in the same way as the reactions of Yin and Yang, the two opposing and interactive aspects of the body according to traditional Chinese medicine. Various movements in the exercise require the practitioners to relax for a while after strength is applied, and suitable force is required after softness or relaxation. In this way, the movements will not be stiff and restrained or slack and fatigued. While making a distinction between softness and toughness, the exercise aims to achieve a good combination of firmness with gentleness. The movements should be appropriately firm and gentle instead of going to extremes. Otherwise, excessive force could lead to stiff and restrained movements, thus affecting breathing and the mind. On the other hand, excessive softness or relaxation tends to cause slackness, also weakening the intended effect."
-   Practice Tips of Yi Jin Jing 

 

 

"Published in various editions (and with increasingly more ancient prefaces) since the seventeenth century, the text's Twelve Tendon Exercises enhance internal muscular functioning rather than strength or vigor.  Each is called by a mythological or illustrative name and undertaken from a standing position in which practitioners hold certain positions while tensing the muscles to strengthen the tendons.  Arms, leggs, and torso are engaged, and the entire body is made suppler and more open.  The mind is kept calm and relaxed, the breath is deep and slow.  Positions should be held for up to nine breaths."
-  Livia Kohn, "Chinese Healing Exercises," 2008, p. 195. 

 

 

"For most of these exercises, my Shifu likes us to use “back breathing” (bei-shi huxi), which is similar to pre-natal/”reverse” breathing, but with less expansion of the front of the chest and more concentration on expanding the back. The idea that so-called “natural” breathing should also be called “Buddhist breathing” (which seems to be common) seems completely wrong to me, not only because we use multiple methods of breathing in Buddhist qigong, but because Buddhist qigong actually prefers the pre-natal and back breathing to the natal (at least, according to Zhou it does)."
-  Dave Chesser, Introduction to Yi Jin Jing

 

 

"Yi Jin Jing (Tendon-Muscle Strengthening Exercises) is a health and fitness exercise handed down from ancient China. In Chinese yi means change, jin means "tendons and sinews", while jing means "methods". This is a relatively intense form of exercise that aims at strengthening the muscles and tendons, so promoting strength and flexibility, speed and stamina, balance and coordination of the body. This exercise pays great attention to the coordination of movements, respiration and mind so as to guarantee that qi circulates freely and smoothly. As with most exercises, there is an enormous variety in form, the most popular being the "12-postures of Changing Tendons" devised by Pan Wei in the Qing dynasty (AD 1644-1911).  Health Qigong--Yi Jin Jing features extended, soft and even movements displaying a graceful charm, and it puts focus on the turning and flexing of the spine, thus invigorating the limbs and internal organs. These movements have been proved to be able to improve health and fitness, prevent diseases, lengthen life and improve the intellect. In particular, practice of the Yi Jin Jing exercises has very impressive effects on the respiratory system, flexibility, balance and muscular strength. It can also prevent and cure diseases of the joints, digestive system, cardiovascular system and nervous system.  From a country where a thousand years are still considered recent history, Yi Jin Jing is truly an ancient art. Based on fragments of historical records, this health exercise was introduced in China more than 3000 years ago. Developed and refined through the ages, Yi Jin Jing, for so long shrouded in mystery, has finally made it to the 21st century in its full glory. Benefits: 1) Yi Jin Jing exercises has very impressive effects on the respiratory system, flexibility, balance and muscular strength. It can also prevent and cure diseases of the joints, digestive system, cardiovascular system and nervous system. 2) It strongly engages the practitioner’s muscle force; this is why one can achieve noticeable results like increased muscle tone and stamina in quite a short time.  3) Those who are desk-bound, spend too long in front of the computer or TV, driving etc., can greatly benefit from the YiJin, as they counter the negative effects of a sedentary and physically inactive lifestyle.  4) It improves body posture and correcting postural and joint problems. Importantly, when learned correctly, it can help undo the negative side-effects often experienced following incorrect practice of various QiGong or Meditation techniques. YiJin is a tonic for the body and mind that lead to an improved energy, physical fitness and strength."
-   Yi Jin Jing

 

 

"The sinew-transforming exercises, a literal translation from the Chinese name Yiji Jing, are a traditional form of such Qigong exercises for overcoming disease and prolonging life of very ancient origin. The full name of Yijinjing is called the Bodhidharma Yijinjing, one component part of Shaolin external Qigong. To practice the Yijinjing frequently can recuperate the Yin and Yang, keep fit, dispel diseases and prolong life.  According to Classics of Internal Medicine, "All disease are latent in the condition of the qi, or vital energy." It is said that if one can keep yin and yang, the two opposite vital properties that permeate the whole body, in harmonious proportion, accordingly nourishing one's blood and vital energy, then one can ward off disease, extend one's years and ensure a long and healthy life free from senile decline. The beneficial effects of Qi Gong on health are therefore well established.  Qi Gong exercises of this tradition may be divided into the "quiet," which usually consist of conscious breathing movement to "exhale the stale and take in the fresh," and the "active," which consist of the art of limb movement. These exercises combining body movement with mental regulation are considered a necessary means to promoting the free function of the vital energy and blood circulation. Perform such exercises every day, and one's health is ensured. These are the ways the ancients preserved their health, methods."
14 Series Sinew Transforming Exercises

 

 

"I learned it with the older transliteration of "I Chin Ching."  The set I know consists of 49 postures done with hard chi breathing where you "hiss". It is good for health but also a very intense strength, flexibility, and balance workout. The first posture is the same as the one stated above, making fists. from there it goes into all sorts of difficult postures in which no part of the body is left out. To me it seems to be a blending of chinese hard chi kung with indian yoga, which fits in well with the story of its creation by Ta Mo. The way it works (supposedly) is by creating muscle tension in specific body parts, then using the breathing and concentration to send the chi there, where the tension traps it and causes it to build up progressively. Once you do all the postures every part of the body has been flooded with chi. Without even considering the chi aspect, its still an enormously difficult physical workout."
Kung Fu Forum on Yi Jin Jing

 

 

"Examine these methods.
There are twelve illustrations. 
From the time of the Five Kingdoms,
Whom has really learned this method?
Ta-mo came from the West,
And spread the doctrines at Shao-lin-ssu. 
In Sung there was Yueh-hou
As an example.
To cure disease and lengthen life's span,
These exercises are unique and incomparable."
-  The Twelve Diva Positions, "Chinese Healing Arts: Internal Kung Fu," 1986, p. 177

 

 

"It's said that the Physique-Changing Scripture (Yi Jin Jing), one of the traditional Qigong exercises in China, was brought in by Dharma and then spread in the Shaolin Temple. Yi means accommodate, change or shed, Jin refers to bones and muscles, and Jing is guide or code, which together means the way to change your physique."
-   Shaolin Kung Fu    

 

 

"The earliest description of Yi Jin Jing exercises can be found on a 2000 years old brocade painting named 'Illustration of Qi Circulation' (Dao Yin), which was unearthed in the 1970s from an ancient tomb in Changsha, Hunan, China. From 526 AD on, monks of the Shaolin Monastery played an important role in the evolution of the Yi Jin Jing exercises. The earliest account of the modern 12-movement exercises is included in the Illustrations of Internal Exercise compiled by Pan Wei in 1858 in the Qing Dynasty. As traditional Yi Jin Jing relies heavily on the traditional Chinese medicine theory of the Five Elements - metal, wood, water, fire, earth - different school of the exercises have evolved, emphasizing this aspect in many works. The Health Qigong Yi Jin Ying absorbed the cream of the traditional 12-routine Yi Jin Ying exercises together with a modern scientific approach. The movements form a continuous integrity, focusing on tendon stretching and bone flexing and combining softness with strength. An essential part of the routines is natural breathing and the integration of mind and body with a relaxed spirit to make the circulation of the vital energy (qi) as unimpeded as possible. Yi Jin Jing movements require a full range of stretching, bending, flexing and twisting in multi-directional and wide-ranging motions of the bones and related joints. As the bones are flexed, the muscle groups, tendons and ligaments are also stretched. This improves the blood circulation, nutrition supersession in the soft tissues of the motion-related areas, increases the flexibility and pliability of such soft tissues as muscles, tendons, ligaments and enhances the mobility of the bones, joints and muscles. The exercises are centered on the twisting, flexing, and stretching of the spine, with the waist as the axis and are conducted at a slow and even pace. Such movements help to stimulate spinal and nerve cords to make them function more effectively, together with the exercise of limbs and internal organs. Strength, when required, is applied in a gradual manner and the muscles should be relaxed to combine strength with tenderness. The Yi Jin Ying movements have been proven to be able to improve health, fitness, prevent diseases, lengthen life and improve intellect. Regular, correct practice has very impressive effects on the respiratory system, flexibility, balance and muscular strength. It may also help to prevent and cure diseases of the joints, digestive, cardiovascular and nervous system."
Health Qigong Canada 

 

 

"1.  Wei Tuo Presents a Club I: Stand upright, place the palms together in front of the heart, push them together with vigor while keeping the legs tense and grabbing the floor with toes and heels.  2.  Wei Tuo Presents a Club II: Keeping the legs and toes engaged, stretch the arms out to the sides, tensing the muscles.  Keep your mind calm and your breath subtle.  3.  Wei Tuo Presents a Club III: Lifting the arms to support heaven with palms facing up, look up.  Still keep the legs engaged, the jaw tight, the mind calm.  4.  Plucking the Stars to Move the Dipper: Place one hand on the lower back while raising the other above the head, palm facing up and looking up at the extended hand.  Press hard in both directions.  Change sides.  5.  Pulling Nine Bulls' Tails: Take a step forward with one leg while placing the other in lunge position.  With one arm reach forward at shoulder level, with the other reach back in a slight twist, keeping both wrists bent.  Push hard.  Change sides."
-  Livia Kohn, Chinese Healing Exercises, 2008, p. 196. 

 

 

"A Shaolin monk took eight groups of the most powerful movements from these two forms [Yi Jin Jin and Xi Su Jing].  This form is called Ba (eight) Duan (best) Jin (movements) or The Eight Treasures.  This is the form that is taught in this book.   When my Master transmitted it to me he told me it was one of the most powerful Qigong forms for health.  Since coming to the West, I have seen many different interpretations of the Eight Treasures.  This version is the Buddhist form that I was taught at the Shaolin Temple, which I have authenticated against the ancient Shaolin books."
-   Shifu Yan Lei,
Instant Health: The Shaolin Workout for Longevity, p. 41. 

 

 

"The Yi Jin Jing is one of the most widely practiced conditioning exercise sets in Chinese martial arts. Its long existence and its adoption by a diverse collection of martial artists have lead to numerous variations. The set is intended to build flexibility and strength in the tendons and muscles while developing a coordinated strength from the ground. Additionally, the progressive stretch/release cycles promote relaxation and are said to stimulate qi flow throughout the body. The name of the set can be translated as Yi – transform/change, Jin – muscles/tendons/fascia, Jing – Classic/classical method.  Most of the exercises follow a coordination of progressive extension from the ground, and relaxation back to the ground:  Toes lightly grip with a suction feeling, Body comes forward slightly activate the calves, Use a feeling of drawing up to the buttocks, Lightly tuck the buttocks up toward the dan tien, Elongate the torso, Stretch up the back, shoulders, arms; Release the stretch using the opposite sequence."
-   Yi Jin Jing.  Rochester Chen Style Taijiquan. 

 

 

"The histories of the Chinese arts taught at the Shaolin Wu-Yi institute have their origins in China during the Liang dynasty in the year 527AD. At this time a Buddhist monk named Da Mo traveled from India to Honan province in Northern China to spread his teachings. Upon arrival the emperor did not favor the teachings of Da Mo so the Monk sought out a nearby Buddhist Temple located at the foot of the Shao Shih Mountain, called the Shaolin Temple. Upon arrival at the temple Da Mo found that the monks were very weak due to many hours of meditation without any physical exercise. In order to improve the level of spiritual cultivation Da Mo left the temple and went into seclusion nearby where he spent the next nine years in deep meditation pondering the difficulties of the monks. When Da Mo returned he had created a set of exercises to greatly improve the physical health of the Shaolin Monks as well as lead them toward deeper meditation and spiritual cultivation. This set of exercises can be divided into three forms. The first form is called the “Shi Ba Lohan Shou” or Eighteen Hands of the Enlightened One, this form consisted of eighteen different positions designed to strengthen the body as well as increase flexibility, coordination and focus. The next form was called the “Yi Jin Jing” or Muscle & Tendon Conditioning Set. The Yi Jin Jing was a Chi Gung form which consisted of a series of hand and arm movements done in coordination with deep breathing and intense concentration. The Yi Jin Jing greatly improves the external strength as well as the health of the internal organs. The last set was called the “Shi Sui Jing” or Bone Marrow & Brain Washing Form. The Shi Sui Jing was the most advanced and complex form left by Da Mo, its purpose was to use the energy built up through the previous two forms in order to reach a deep state of meditation in order to raise up the spirit during meditation and reach a state of enlightenment. Da Mo died in 539AD and was recognized as an enlightened being."
History of the Shaolin Wu-Yi Institute 

 

 

"March 3rd, in the spring, Two years passed Zenguan period in Tang Dynasty.
Written by the General Li Jing
Note: This preface introduces the story of how the book Yi Jin Jing came from and the effect of practice. The text is written in the way with a dense religion color and readers must distinguish and understand the real meaning.  The introduction of volume One:
The main idea of the master Bodhidharma: there are two elemental steps to gain "Zhengguo",called "Chuji", one is "Qingxu", the other is "Tuohuan". To achieve Qingxu, one has to have no any confusion in his feeling and spirit; to achieve Tuohuan, he or she will have got no obstacle, so he can be samadhi (enter into trance). Knowing this, one is said to have got the foundation of work. Qingxu is the same as Xisui; the Tuohuan is the same as Yijing. The idea of Xisui is: through the whole life, a human being always undergoes love and passion. If he cannot resist on refusing all the temptation for his life, he will fail and degenerate. If he wants to gain the Prajna and the gnosis, he must first purely purify his all organs and bones. Only by doing this, can he begin his lesson of mortification and reach the Prajna at last.
Without this process of the entry, one is said to have no foundation. To obtain Xisui is to clean one's inside feeling and spirit; the aim of Yi Jing is to strengthen and enhance one's body. If one can both be Qingxu inside and strong outside, it will be easy for him to reach the state of the door of Shen?. The idea ofYi Jin Jing is: All the tendons and bones of human are formed in one's foetus state, .... someone's tendon is loose, or disorder, or weak, or contracted, or strong, or easy, or in harmonic situation, all sorts of tendons are decided by the forming of foetus. It is said about the tendons that the looseness of them means ill; the disorder means thin; the rotten means impotent; being weak means slack; being contracted means dying; being easy means long; being powerful means strong; being harmonic means healthy. If one has no Qingxu inside but on the contrary with lots of obstacles within, how could he enter into the fight access? In reality, to enter into the gate of Taoism, changing the tendon and muscle to strengthen and enhance one's body will be the first of all, or one will deviate from Taoism and could not reach its aim any more. So it is what Yi Jin Jing says, it is of Yin and Yang, being negative and positive aspects in Taoism. Yi means change, and the change between Yin and Yang is like the shadow of moon and sun in the bottle, or such as the Yin and Yang display on the palm although. The key is up to the practicer, as the two aspects are both up to human's will. Anything could be changed indeed, falsehood one could be changed into truth; coldness one could be changed into hotness; something strong can change into something weak; quiet can change into activeness; being downward can change into being up; pressing can change into ease; the passive can change into the positive; danger can be changed into safety; the trouble can change to be managed; the misfortune can change into good fortune; the dying can be changed to the survivable. The "Qishu" can be changed by will to save.  All the things in the world can be changed back or forward, so do the tendon and bone of human. The tendon is out of the bone marrow, within the skin muscle. There are all tendons, relative to each other all over the body to pass through
and control the vim and other things as the outside aid of the spirit. Like the shoulder can carry, the hand can tweak, the foot can step, all these are the functions of the tendons. So the tendon can not permitted to be loose, to get into disorder, to get rotten, weak, or contracted and so on. What about one with such illness as Lao? how could he enter into the Taoism? The Master taught the method to cure them, to let the disorder becomes normal. Then, the weak becomes strong, the loose becomes harmonized, the contracted becomes long, the rotten becomes powerful. In a word, the ill body becomes strong and solid. That function of changing is called "Yi". The body is the base of the benefit and good, so Yin and Yang are controlled and can be mastered by human whatever. If one can maintain his wellbeing from the ill
effect of Yin and Yang, he can also change his normal body into the strongest as hard as the diamond, with no any confusion inside, no obstacle outside. At this state, he can go into Dhyana (concentration) and also can go out from Dhyana. His work is not a trivial matter, but because of the sequence of the process and the doctrines having the inside and outside aspects of two. This can be examined in each from the regular daily life and the produce process of the medicine and apparatus. The Novice must first burn the fragrant to show his promise and determination, being brave and strong to do the lesson as the doctrine told. If one can persist in it ,it is sure for him to reach the door of "Shen".  Bancimidi (the Sangha) notes, the text is the original idea of great master of Bodhidharma, and it is the general idea of the Yi Jin. This translation script is the same meaning as the original without any change. The volume One is about the meaning of the book content in detail. If can meet other great masters from India, please ponder over it again."
Book of Scripture of the Yi Jin Jing from Shaolin Revelations

 

 

"The Yi Jin Jing exercises are a form of wai dan (external chi developing) qigong that uses yi, focused intent and visualization to develop local chi and increase chi circulation.  This later evolved into the Lohan Shi-Ba Zhang (18 Priest-Scholar Palms) Martial Arts that formed the foundation of Chinese temple boxing and Shaolin arts.   In Chinese medicine, tendons generally represent meridians or pathways for the energy to flow. Marrow refers to the heart.  Hence, Yi Jin Jing refers to changing tendons or opening up the channels throughout the body and cleansing them of all blockages. Once the blockages are removed the chi can then flow naturally and health is restored.  With regular practice of the Yi Jin Jing, the practitioner can not only maintain good health but can also develop a strong immunity against almost any form of disease and even deterioration due to age.  This is the origin of Da Mo Qigong. This internal art is still practiced today, but it has developed into a set of exercises designed for health maintenance and to treat chronic disease, in addition to promoting its original goal of meditation and enlightenment."
Qigong Martial Arts Origins

 

 

"Today the most respected routine is that of Wang Zuyuan, composed of 12 exercises, and has been adopted by the most authoritative Academies of Chinese Medicine in China. Chang Renxia together with Chang Weizhen proposed an alternative 14 series, which can be of interest for the therapeutic effects he promises. Deng Ming Dao presents a version of 24 series, but with another name, Xisuijing. In fact, another point of crossing is the relationship between the Xisuijing (Method or Classic of Marrow Transforming and Cleansing) and the Yijinjing. Some authors tend to use those two names for the same routine; others keep things separated and invoke different results and different effects on the body; other authors have written different books and created different theories, sometimes not just for the quest of the final truth. Still the source is the famed name of Bodhidharma.  The 12 Posture Moving Exercise kept to this day is something that Wang Zuyuan (circa 1850) learned at Shaolin Temple at the Song Mountain. It is somewhat different from the original “Picture of stationary exercise” and “Guide to the art of attack” (as Guangdong sources refers). Some specialists (Liu Dong) refer of a later integration of Yijinjing, Daoyin, Tuna and XingQi methods. However Wang’s 12 Postures found to be concise through practice and helps to enhance one’s physical health. As the name implies, “sinew transforming exercise” is the method to train the tendons and muscles. The exercise is designed according to the course and the characteristics of Qi circulation in the 12 regular channels and Du and Ren channels. During practice, Qi and blood usually circulates appropriately with proper speed and no sluggishness or stagnation. Because of this efficacy, Yijinjing has existed for centuries as a favorite with the populace and is still widely used in sanatoria and hospitals for therapeutic purposes. Two ancient written and illustrated routines remained, one from Chen Yi’s “A collection of Annals” published during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and another more recent published in 1882, from “Internal Work Illustrated”, that of Wang Zuyuan.  The 12 Posture Moving Exercise most closely describes what is called the 12 fists of Tamo in Many southern martial arts most notably Hung Gar & Wing chun. Ascribing the 12 exercises to 12 animals that Tamo studied after his 9 years of meditation. The exercises were developed based on the movements of the 12 animals. These exercises healed the sickly monks of the Shaolin Temple, and contribute to the many animal based martial arts in China."
-   Yi Jin Jing - Wikipedia 

 

 

"The breathing technique we will use with Yi Jin Jing Qigong is the Ming Men Breathing technique: 1) Inhale slowly and expand the lower abdomen.  2)  Push out your navel and pull up your perineum and anus towards the expanded navel.  3)  Without exhaling, pull your navel toward your spine and push your anus towards the Ming Men point on your spine.  4) Exhale slowly as you hold the pull.  5) release and begin again."
-  Eric Yudelove, 100 Days to Better Health, Good Sex and Long Life

 

 

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                易筋经

 

 

Names of the Yi Jin Jing Qigong Movements/Routines/Sections

Opening Form 
Starting Position
Preparation Posture (Qi Shi)


1.  Wei Tuo Presenting the Pestle 1
  (A)

     General Skanda Holds the Cudgel  (B) 
     Wei Tuo, or Skanda, the Temple Guardian in Buddhism 
     Wei Tuo Presents a Club 1  (D) 
     First form of Wei Tuo Presenting a Pestle, Praying Palm
     First Aspect of Wei-to Offering the Pestle  (E) 
     Folding Hands in Front of Chest 
     Working at a Mortar  (C) 
     Salute the Guardians of the Way  (F) 
     Pounding and Husking Grain  (Daochu Chongliang)  (G) 


2.  Wei Tuo Presenting the Pestle 2  (A) 

     Wei Tuo Presents a Club 2  (D) 
     Shoulder Up Evil-Subduing Cudgel  (B) 
     Raise Arms to Carry an Evil-Banishing Pole 
     Carrying the Grain with a Shoulder Pole (C)   
     The Second Aspect of Wei-to  (E) 
     Shoulder Your Staff   (F) 
     Shouldering Grain with a Pole  (Biandan Tiaoliang)   (G) 


3.  Wei Tuo Presenting the Pestle 3  (A) 

     Prop Heaven with Palms  (B) 
     Wei Tuo Presents a Club 3  (D)    
     Hold Up the Sky with Both Hands 
     Winnowing Grains (C)   
     The Third Aspect of Wei-to  (E) 
     Reach Up to the Heavens and Root Into the Earth   (F) 
     Separating the Chaff from the Grain  (Yangfeng Jingliang)  (G)  


4.  Plucking Stars on Each Side  (A)  

     Gather the Big Dipper  (B)     
     Plucking the Stars to Move the Dipper  (D)   
     Taking Away a Star and Changing the Dipper for It  (E) 
     Exchanging Stars 
     Shifting a Bag of Grain on the Shoulders  (C) 
     Finding the Constellation Amongst the Stars   (F) 
     Carrying a Sack of Grain on Your Shoulders (Huanjian Kangliang)


5.  Pulling Nine Cows by Their Tails  (A)   

     Drag Nine Oxen by the Tails  (B)   
     Pulling Nine Bull's Tails  (D)   
     Pulling the Ox Cart
     Pulling Nine Oxen's Tails Backwards  (E) 
     Pulling Back Nine Bulls by the Tail 
     Pulling the Ox's Tail 
     Piling Up Grain Bags  (C) 
     Harnessing the Power of Nine Oxen  (F) 
     Stacking Sacks of Grain (Tuidai Duoliang)   (G) 


6.  Showing Talons and Spreading Wings  (A)    

     Show Claws and Flash Wings  (B) 
     Extending Claws, Spreading Wings  (D)
     Displaying Paw-Style Palms like a White Crane Spreading Its Wings 
     Pushing Out the Claws and Extending the Wings  (E) 
     Pulling a Cart  (C) 
     The Diving Eagle Spreads His Talons  (F) 
 
    Pulling and Ox Laden with Grain (Qianniu Laliang)   (G) 


7.  Nine Ghosts Drawing Sabers  (A)    

     Nine Ghosts Unsheathe Their Sabers  (B) 
     Nine Ghosts Pull Swords  (D) 
     Tugging a Boat  (C)   
     Nine Devils Drawing a Dagger  (E) 
     Nine Demons Draw Their Swords  (F) 
     Carrying Grain on Your Back  (Beiqian Yunliang)   (G) 


8.  Sinking the Three Bodily Zones  (A)  

    The Body Rises and Falls  (B) 
    Three Plates Drop to the Ground  (D) 
    Three Plates Falling on the Floor 
    Three Plates Falling on the Ground  (E) 
    Three Dishes Falling on the Ground 
    The Body Rises and Falls
    Lifting a 1000 Kilos 
    Loading and Unloading the Grain  (C) 
    Loading and Unloading Bags of Rice  (F) 
    Unloading Baskets of Grain (Panluo Xieliang)   (G) 


9.  Black Dragon Displaying Its Claws  (A)  

     The Black Dragon Pushes Its Claws  (B)   
     Green Dragon Extends Claws  (D)
     Azure Dragon Stretching Its Claws  (E) 
     Dragon Showing Claws  
     Stacking Up the Grain  (C) 
     The Blue Dragon Holds the Pearl in Her Claws  (F) 
     Wrapping Straw Mats Around the Grain (Weibao Tunliang)    (G) 


10.  Tiger Springing On Its Prey  (A)     

       The Tiger Pounces on Its Prey  (B)  
       Crouching Tiger Catches Prey  (D) 
       Hungry Tiger Pounces on Its Prey 
       Farmer Searching for Locusts 
       The Lying Tiger Spring at His Food  (E) 
       Protecting the Grain  (C) 
       The Tiger Pounces on Its Prey  (F) 
       Catching Locusts (Pudi Huliang)   (G) 


11.  Bowing Down in Salutation  (A)      

       Beat Drum and Bend Trunk  (B) 
       Bending in a Bow  (D) 
       Deep Bows Before the Buddha 
       Garnering Grains  (C)   
       Making a Bow  (E) 
       Bowing Before the Enlightened Ones  (F) 
       Gathering the Grain (Quti Jianliang)   (G) 


12.  Swinging the Tail  (A)  

       Shake Head and Wag Tail  (B)
       Wagging the Tail  (D, E) 
       Shake the Head and Wag the Tail 
       Storing the Grain  (C) 
       Scooping Up the Grain  (F) 
       Scooping Up the Grain (Gongshen Shouliang)   (G) 


Closing Form

 

Sources: 

 

A.  "Yi Jin Jing: Chinese Health Qigong."  Compiled by the Chinese Health Qigong Association.  Beijing, China, Foreign Languages Press, 2007.  95 pages, charts, includes an instructional DVD. 

B.  "Internal Work Illustrated," published in 1882.  Found in "Ancient Way to Keep Fit,"compiled by Zong Wu and Li Mao.  Translated by Song Luzeng, Liu Beijian, and Liu Zhenkai.  Paintings by Zhang Ke Ren.  Bolinas, California, Shelter Publications, 1992.  pp. 169-181. 

C.  "A Collection of Annals," by Chen Yi, published in the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).  Found in "Ancient Way to Keep Fit,"compiled by Zong Wu and Li Mao.  Translated by Song Luzeng, Liu Beijian, and Liu Zhenkai.  Paintings by Zhang Ke Ren.  Bolinas, California, Shelter Publications, 1992.  pp. 157-168. 

D.  "Chinese Healing Exercises: The Tradition of Daoyin."  By Livia Kohn.  University of Hawaii Press, 2008, pp.195-196. 

E.  "Chinese Healing Arts: Internal Kung Fu."  Edited by William R. Berk.  Burbank, CA, Unique Publications, 1986.  209 pages.  ISBN: 0865680833.  Includes numerous translations of classic works.  A translation of the Yi Jin Jing with illustrations, called "The Twelve Deva Postions" is found on pp. 165-177. 

F.  "Walking Yi Jin Jing."  By Mike Garofalo.   Yi Jin Jing Webpage, 2009. 

G.  "Beginning Qigong: Chinese Secrets for Health and Longevity."  By Stephen Comee.   Tokyo, Tuttle Publishing, 1993.  120 pages.  ISBN:0804817219.  The Yi Jin Jing is described on pp. 28-56. 

 

 

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Lessons, Instructions, Practice Notes
Yi Jin Jing Qigong
Muscle & Tendon Transforming Classic Daoyin
A Walking Cane Version of the Yi Jin Jing by Mike Garofalo
 


Introduction


All of the versions of the Yi Jin Jing practices I have studied are done while standing in one place.  No versions that I have studied involve walking as part of the practice.  No versions involve holding anything in your hands like a staff, cane, taiji ruler, stick, medicine ball, kettlebell, vajra, or stone.  Most of the Yi Jin Jing practices I have studied are done without using alternating cycles of muscular tension and muscular relaxation during the movement sequences and postures.

The Yi Jin Jing practice I will be describing below involves holding a wooden cane while practicing.  This version has numerous phases of muscular/tendon/sinew tensing and then releasing muscular tension phases during the actualization of the postures.  In this version, most of the movement sequences and postures are performed while walking, and some while standing still.  Therefore, this version is not the "traditional" Yi Jin Jing practice, although close in many respects to most popular versions in the gross movements and postures.  Readers have ample instructional models of the popular versions of the Yi Jin Jing.  This version of the Yi Jin Jing Qigong represents my own interpretation and adaptation, conversion to a walking method, and adapted for practice while holding a cane.  My version of the Yi Jin Jing is more dynamic, more physically demanding, more for active walkers, more a hard style qigong than other versions now available. 

I take long walks in the morning as often as possible.  When I walk, I always take my hickory walking staff with me.  I do a variety of exercises with my cane as I walk.  I walk down a long paved lane in a rural area in the North Sacramento Valley in California.  I walk about a half mile along this country lane and then turn and walk back about a half mile.  Then, I stop in a wide shaded area every 15 minutes or so and practice some cane forms (e.g., Eight Immortals Cane Yang Form) or Sun Style Taijiquan or Qigong.  These practice sessions can last up to 90 minutes and longer.  As I was reading about, researching, learning about, and practicing the Yi Jin Jing Qigong, I found myself doing variations of some of the movements of the Yi Jin Jing while holding my cane as I was walking, or during my practice sessions with my cane in between the brisk walking.  

By "staff" I mean a cane, a short staff, a walking stick, a jo, a zhang, a wooden stick under 50" long.  I use a wooden crooked neck cane that is 40" (103 cm) long and 1" (2.54 cm) in diameter. This cane weights 1lb, 2 oz (510 gm).  This beautiful martial arts combat cane is made of pure hickory heartwood, has multiple notches at three key gripping points, has a rounded hooked horn, and has a rubber covered tip.  In the literature about the Yi Jin Jing, the word "staff" is more often used to mean a long wood pole, a long staff, a gun, a bo, an eyebrow staff, a pole placed across the upper back that is used to "shoulder" or to carry loads (e.g., bags of grain, water buckets, etc.) fixed to the ends of the pole.  The Shaolin Buddhist Temple is most often associated with complex and effective martial arts long staff weapons (gun) techniques and forms, and, the Yi Jin Jing is closely associated with Shaolin hard and soft qigong versions.  Some even claim that Da-Mo, the Bodhidharma, circa 500 CE, created the Yi Jin Jing exercises for the monks who spent a lot of time in seated meditation.    

Persons who are frail, recovering from illness, completely out of shape, very old, weak, or who find qigong meditation possible only with very slow, soft and gentle physical movements are advised to practice a version of the Yi Jin Jing more suited to their current health situation or meditation objectives.  For these persons, I recommend the Yi Jin Jing version being documented and popularized by the Chinese Health Qigong Association.     

Each of you must come to an understanding of "internal force" vs "external force."  For me, using "internal force" means doing an exercise slowly, deliberately, without much muscular exertion or tension, seldom breaking a sweat, done in a relaxed manner, with clear intentions, and with some visualizations.  I find that people are often quite vague about the meaning of "internal force," "internal energy," or "Qi."  For them, "internal force" or "Qi" means, roughly, a non-measurable, non-material, and non-quantifiable force; a power or force with properties of a fluid; a source of power in the body that is not muscular or electrical; something that is felt; a life giving force; something essential, real and vital for human life.  The movements in this version of the Yi Jin Jing are performed with vigor, muscular tension, stretching and tightening, aerobic walking, deliberateness, focus, and effort - some would say with too much "external force," too martial, to much a "hard" style of qigong.    

The "transformation" of the muscles and tendons occurs because of the regular habits of walking, cane exercises, and Yi Jin Jing posture work.  The psychological aspects of the Yi Jin Jing practices such as concentration, attentiveness, visualizations, alternating tension and relaxation, the use of willpower to maintain a regular practice, contemplation of positive themes, etc., all also contribute to the well being of both body and mind.  You must establish a consistent practice five days a week for many months to feel and realize substantive holistic benefits, improve the immune and nervous system, strengthen the muscles and tendons, establish a positive habit, reduce ordinary aches and pains, ameliorate chronic conditions, uplift your mood, and plant the seeds for a better life. 

I am skeptical about the claims of some people that qigong mastery will enable you to perform amazing feats of strength, avoid injury when assaulted, repel real adversaries using internal force, display paranormal or supernatural powers, control others using Qi Force, cure serious diseases, live over 100 years in perfect health, make you wiser, or make you into an Immortal.  All exercise methods and products that you must pay for are marketed with a certain amount of hype, sales pitch exaggerations, glowing testimonials, trickery and magick, celebrity masters and spokespersons, amazing demonstrations, marvelous before and after progress photos, and effusive promotional language.  The same is true of Qigong Religions where you join a loyal congregation of believers, obey and revere a guru master who promises you an amazing life-changing transformation, subscribe to a non-rational credo, follow the ritual practices, expect wonders and the miraculous, and where true believers are guaranteed a passport to the Promised Land of a Perfect Life. 

The Yi Jin Jing walking version talked about here is suitable for most healthy people to practice daily, will add some variety to your exercise routines, is fun, combines aerobic training and stretching, and will probably benefit your body and mind.  These reasons are sufficient for giving the practice a try.         

I hope you will enjoy and benefit from the practice of my walking version of the Yi Jin Jing.  

Best Wises to All for Good Health and Happiness!! 

Mike Garofalo
Summer of 2009
Red Bluff, California

 

 

"If you look for the truth outside yourself,
It gets farther and farther away.
Today walking alone, I meet it everywhere I step.
It is the same as me, yet I am not it.
Only if you understand it in this way
Will you merge with the way things are."
- Tung-Shan

 

 

General Instructions  

Take your wooden walking cane along with you for your exercises.  I recommend a wood cane rather than a metal or plastic cane.  
Wear loose fitting clothing suitable for the season.  Cover the head appropriately for the season. 
Start gently by walking at a slow to moderate pace, then increase the pace as you warm up. 
Use the cane for doing various exercises while walking to strengthen and gain flexibility in the hands, wrists, forearms, biceps, triceps and shoulders. 

 
All movements will be performed when walking and/or in a still standing position. 
Breathing is deep and steady. 
    Breathe in through the nose and out through the mouth. 
Keep the mind calm, focused, and untroubled. 
Set aside the mundane planning, cares, and concerns of the day during the practice period. 
Utilize some of the mental imagery and concentration themes that are recommended for each of the "Twelve Diva Positions."   
Repeat the exercises until fatigue sets in and then relax as you continue to walk at a comfortable pace. 
I recommend that you walk for 60 to 90 minutes. 
 

 

Postures and Exercises of the Yi Jin Jing Walking Version

1.  Salute the Guardians of the Way 
 
2.  Shoulder Your Staff  

3.  Reach Up to the Heavens and Root Into the Earth  

4.  Finding the Constellation Amongst the Stars  

5.  Harnessing the Power of Nine Oxen  

6.  The Diving Eagle Spreads His Talons   

7.  Nine Demons Draw Their Swords  

8.  Loading and Unloading Bags of Rice  

9.  The Blue Dragon Holds the Pearl in Her Claws 

10.  The Tiger Pounces on Its Prey 

11.  Bowing Before the Enlightened Ones

12.  Scooping Up the Grain

 

 

 

1.  Salute the Guardians of the Way 
      Present Your Staff to Xuan Wu or Wei Tuo
      Salutation to the Immortal Guardians of Righteousness 
      Wei Tuo Holds the Vajra and Says a Prayer to Buddha
      Salute to Wei Tuo at Wudang Mountain
      Offer Greetings to Wei Tuo
    

Wei Tuo is a statue at the entrance to Buddhist monasteries and temples.  Wei Tuo is also know as the Bodhisattva Skanda, Vajrapani, Veda, or Idaten.  He is a Guardian or Protector Deity, upholding and defending Buddhist principles.  His totems include a flaming halo and a vajra (thunderbolt staff, diamond cutter ritual tool or scepter).  "A deva or inhabitant of heaven, who protects the Buddhist religion and three of the four continents into which the world is divided.  It is the name of the Bodhisattva general under the Four Great Kings, who stands in the front hall of all Buddhist monasteries." (Berk 1986, p.166)

Xuan Wu is a statue at the entrance to Daoist monasteries and temples at Wudang Mountain and at other locations.  Xuan Wu Dadi (Dark Lord of the North) is a Taoist immortal, a Guardian or Protector Deity, upholding Daoist principles.  His totems include a sword, a turtle and a snake.  He is a defender of the Tao, Warrior of the Way. 

The Way is the Tao, the path is the Dao. 

Walk at a steady, even, comfortable pace. 
Stand up tall and straight.
Hold your cane at the center of the chest, with you hands at the level of the heart (on the line from between the nipples). 
      Hold the cane about 6" to 8" from the chest. 
      Hold the cane with the right hand on top over the left hand.   
      Hold the crook curved end of the cane on the top.
      Both hands grip the cane.   
      Inhale and exhale a few times, in a breathing pace at a comfortable rate relative to your walking pace. 
           Generally, throughout these 12 exercises, when you inhale relax the abdomen but don't expand the chest too much. 
      Settle the mind, calm the spirit. 
      Salute Wei Tuo or Xuan Wu and enter the sacred space of serious qigong. 
As you exhale, grip the cane firmly with both hands, squeezing the hands tightly around the cane.   
      Tense the hands, arms, shoulders and back as you exhale. 
      Squeeze the cane equally with both hands.  Try not to let your stronger hand (usually the right hand) exert more force. 
      Inhale through the nose, exhale through the mouth. 
      As you exhale, tense the abdomen drawing the belly button towards the spine and tensing the upper torso. 
      Image breathing out into the lower back (Ming Men). 
      The amount of tension in the muscles of the upper torso and arms should be high. 
      Look up slightly as you exhale.  Move the arms forward (out to one foot or 12" from the chest) and upward slightly as you exhale. 
Relax all the musculature of the upper body as you inhale.   
      Release all tension in the arms and hands as you inhale. 
      Look forward at the cane. 
      Draw the cane closer to the chest. 
Try to keep the breath steady, even, full, calm, and subtle. 
      "Fix the breath and gather in the spirit (energy), with a pure heart and respectful countenance." (Berk)
Keep walking at a steady and even pace as you tense and relax the upper torso. 
      Your legs are also tensing and relaxing as you walk.  An effective and natural walking pace involves gentle tensing and relaxing of the lower torso. The walking mechanics are largely unconscious. 
      The legs are loose, fluid, flowing, moving forward. 
Tense (pull the arms apart) and relax (release tension in the upper torso) up to eight times. 
After completing the desired repetitions of the First Movement, Saluting the Guardians of the Way, resume walking at a comfortable pace, cane at your side in your right hand. 

An alternate hand position is fingers interlaced at chest height and holding your cane between your palms.  With his hand position, when you exhale, squeeze the cane between the palms, pushing the palms together as you tense the front and back of the upper body.  The hand position is similar to Anjali Mudra (Salutation Seal) in Hatha Yoga.  "Anjali is a gesture of respect, blessing and salutation. Therefore this asana gesture seals the energy in the body and also seals the relationship with the divine. This is even at times known as the Hridyanjali Mudra, Atmanjali or the Heart Seal or the Salutation Seal."

If you do this first posture while standing and not walking, then tense the legs, and lower torso, as well as the upper torso, as you exhale. 

Some recommend tensing when inhaling and relaxing when exhaling.  I favor the opposite: relaxing when inhaling and tensing when exhaling.  For me, I find it wiser to exhale while exerting myself in strength training: exhaling while pushing up from a squat, or exhaling while pressing weight up in a bench press, or exhaling while pulling a weight down in a seated pull-down, or exhaling when pulling a weight up in a bicep curl, etc.  Exertion during muscular tension while holding one's breath drives up blood pressure, so it is better to exhale when exerting muscular tension during strength training. 

Having the "proper attitude" is very important to successful practice in Qigong (Daoyin).  Mental determination, specific intentions, concentration, fiery will, and clear visualizations must all be brought to focus on the tasks at hand.       


Themes for reflection or meditation, while walking, and after doing Exercise One:

Think of your cane as a Vajra which, in the hands of Vajrapani, can cut like a diamond, strike like a thunderbolt, and symbolizes strength and firmness in spirit, a fiery will, the destruction of ignorance, the flames of wisdom, and fierce determination to overcome all obstacles. 
Pretend that you posses the magical cane of Sifu Miao Zhang.     
Resolve to understand, appreciate, and respect the World that gives you your life each day. 
How do you protect and guard others? 
How can you be a Guardian of the Way, Cultivator of the Tao, Protector of the Buddha Mind

"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks."  - John Muir
"The longest journey begins with a single step."  - Lao Tsu, Tao Te Ching
"Thoughts come clearly while one walks."  - Thomas Mann
"Walking is the great adventure, the first meditation, a practice of heartiness and soul primary to humankind.  Walking is the exact balance between spirit and humility."  - Gary Snyder

Wei Tuo and Xuan Wu are guardian dieties, with statues frequently at the entrance to a sacred, holy or ritual space.  Before you can begin you must enter this sacred space.  Most martial artists bow, holding the hands in a respectful salutation, before they enter the practice area.  Likewise, show your respects to the Honorable Powers and ask for Their Blessings at the start of your Yi Jin Jing practice. 

I sometimes stop walking, hold my cane at my chest in the salutation seal, face the sun, and say a Navaho prayer.  If you feel more comfortable with sending a salutation or greeting to God, Allah, Shiva, Deus, Jesus, Krishna or some other diety, instead of Wei Tuo or Xuan Wu or The Great Spirit, then do so.  Many favor an more traditional I/Thou spiritual communion, others an I/Its or and I/I meditation style (Read "Integral Life Practice" by Ken Wilber, 2008, pp. 197-254). 

The main idea is reaching out to forces, energies and persons (humans, saints, immortals, divinities, deities, archetypes, etc.) that uphold high virtues, goodness, creativity, and beauty in life.  With respect, we salute and send greetings, salutations, and good wishes to these powerful forces, energies and persons.  You are seeking support for good health, strength, courage and good works in your life.  You are showing reverence and respect to the Big Picture in Life. 

This seal of salutation shows that you are being thankful, respectful, and humble towards the Great Other, Nature, the Bountiful and Beneficent Ones.  Be so very thankful for being able to walk - never forget this blessing, benefit, boon.  Hail and Thanks to All for keeping the Fire and Air (Qi) in our Legs and Heart! 

 

 

2.  Shoulder Your Staff
      Wei Tuo Holds His Staff on His Shoulders 
      Raise Arms to Carry an Evil-Banishing Staff 


Bring both arms directly in front of the body, and extend your arms forward at shoulder height.
Hold the crook end (curved end, handle end) of the cane in your right hand. 
Inhale as you open the arms to the sides of your body. 
Keep the hands, arms and cane at shoulder height.  The palms are facing up.  The shaft of the cane is held level with the shoulders. 
As you exhale, tense the arms, shoulders, chest, and upper back. 
     Draw the lower abdominals in (tighten) as you exhale. 
     Imagine exhaling into the lower back (Ming Men). 
Inhale and relax the body - untense the muscles. 
     As you inhale turn the palms to face downward, keeping them level with the shoulders. 
As you exhale, tense the arms, shoulders, chest, and upper back. 
     Draw the lower abdominals in (tighten them) as you exhale. 
     Imagine exhaling into the lower back. 
Inhale and relax the body - untense the muscles. 
Repeat the tensing and untensing of the upper torso for 3 to 8 breath cycles.
     The rate of inhalation and exhalation is coordinated comfortably with your walking pace. 
Finally, when tiring, as you inhale, turn the palms to face upward, keeping them level with the shoulders. 
As you exhale, draw the arms forward to the front of the body with the palms up.   
     Touch the hands together at about shoulder height in front of the body.
     Transfer the cane from the right hand to the left hand. 
Repeat the previous pattern of tensing (exhale) and untensing (inhale) the upper body muscles with the cane in the left hand. 
Repeat the tensing and untensing of the upper torso, and turning the palms up and down, for 3 to 8 breath cycles. 
Finally, when tiring, as you inhale, turn the palms to face upward, keeping them level with the shoulders. 
As you exhale, draw the arms forward to the front of the body with the palms up.   
     Touch the hands together at about shoulder height in front of the body.
     Move the cane to the right hand. 
     Allow both arms to return to the sides of the body.
     Return to your normal hand and arm movement flow while walking forward. 

"1.  Wei Tuo Presents a Club I: Stand upright, place the palms together in front of the heart, push them together with vigor while keeping the legs tense and grabbing the floor with toes and heels.  2.  Wei Tuo Presents a Club II: Keeping the legs and toes engaged, stretch the arms out to the sides, tensing the muscles.  Keep your mind calm and your breath subtle.  3.  Wei Tuo Presents a Club III: Lifting the arms to support heaven with palms facing up, look up.  Still keep the legs engaged, the jaw tight, the mind calm.  4.  Plucking the Stars to Move the Dipper: Place one hand on the lower back while raising the other above the head, palm facing up and looking up at the extended hand.  Press hard in both directions.  Change sides.  5.  Pulling Nine Bulls' Tails: Take a step forward with one leg while placing the other in lunge position.  With one arm reach forward at shoulder level, with the other reach back in a slight twist, keeping both wrists bent.  Push hard.  Change sides."
-  Livia Kohn, Chinese Healing Exercises, 2008, p. 196. 


Keep a quiet and happy heart.  Keep a fine Inner Smile. 
Breathe easy, softly, subtly. 
The eyes are wide open and the mouth soft. 

If you do this second posture while standing and not walking, then tense the legs, curl and grasp the ground with the toes, and tighten up the lower torso, as well as the upper torso, as you exhale. 


Themes for reflection or meditation, while walking, after doing Exercise Two:

Resolve to take personal responsibility for your health and well-being.
Resolve to "Shoulder Your Fair Share" of responsibilities to yourself, your family, and your community. 
Resolve to banish laziness, irresponsibility, and shirking your duties. 
Resolve to "Put Your Shoulder" towards pushing towards the Common Good. 
Acknowledge that you must also take the load off your shoulders and take time to relax, rest, recuperate, and rejuvenate. 
"I am a slow walker, but I never walk backwards."  - Abraham Lincoln 
"He who limps is still walking."  - Stanislaw J. Lec

"One thing that you find out when you have been practicing mindfulness for a while is that nothing is quite as simple as it appears.  This is as true for walking as it is for anything else.  For one thing, we carry our mind around with us when we walk, so we are usually absorbed in our own thoughts to one extent or another.   We are hardly ever just walking, even when we are just going out for a walk.  Walking meditation involves intentionally attending to the experience of walking itself.  This brings your attention to the actual experience of walking as you are doing it, focusing on the sensations in your feet and legs, feeling your whole body moving.  You can also integrate awareness of your breathing with the experience."  - John Kabat-Zinn 

 

 

3.  Reach Up to the Heavens and Root Into the Earth
      Wei Tuo Lifts His Vaijra Up to the Buddha   
      Lift Your Arms in Praise of the Wonders of the World   

      Press Heaven and Earth 

 

Place your cane in both hands, palms facing down.
Hold the cane so that the center of the cane is in the center of your body.
The crook curved end is in the right hand. 
Continue walking forward at a steady, even, deliberate pace. 
Inhale as you draw the shaft of your can towards the chest. 
Exhale as you press the cane up with both hands.
     Reaching upward implies extending the arms, without to much muscular tensions, as if reaching up to pick a ripe plum.  Here, we are actually pressing
         upward or pushing the cane upward as if lifting a weight, with more tension. 
     Squeeze the cane with your hands and tense your arms and shoulders. 
     Imagine exhaling energy into the lower back. 
     Imagine the branches of a tree reaching higher into the sky towards the sun. 
     Lift your chin upwards and glance upward at your cane as it reaches the highest point. 
          Get a nice stretch of the front of the neck as you draw you head back and lift your chin. 
Begin to inhale and relax the upper torso. 
     Look forward as you inhale and continue walking. 
     Release any tension in the musculature of the upper torso. 
     Bring you cane to the center of your chest at the end of the inhale. 

Exhale as you press the cane down towards the earth with both hands.
     Squeeze the cane with your hands and tense your arms and shoulders. 
     Imagine exhaling energy into the lower back. 
     Imagine the roots of a tree pushing down into and rooting deeper into the earth for water. 
     Draw your chin down towards your upper chest.  Glance at your cane as it reaches the highest point. 
          Get a nice stretch of the back of the neck as you draw you chin towards your collarbone.   

Begin to inhale and relax the upper torso. 
     Look forward as you inhale and continue walking. 
     Release any tension in the musculature of the upper torso. 
     Bring you cane to the center of your chest at the end of the inhale. 

Alternate between pressing your cane up, coming to center, pressing your cane down, coming to center ... repeat. 
Continue to inhale and release all tension and relax as the arms are drawn to the center of the body.   
Repeat pressing upwards and downwards on the exhale for 3 to 8 repetitions. 
Keep the rate of inhalation and exhalation at a comfortable level relative to your walking pace. 
     The faster you walk the faster your rate of respiration and heartbeat rate. 
After completing the desired repetitions of the Third Movement, Reach Up to the Heavens and Root Into the Earth, resume walking at a comfortable pace, with your cane at your side in your right hand. 

If you are not walking, press the cane above the head as you exhale and rise up on the toes.  Inhale as you relax, draw the cane to your heart, and flatten your feet.  There is no pushing the cane downward when standing still in the popular version of the Yi Jin Jing


Themes for reflection or meditation, while walking, after doing Exercise Three:  

Resolve to reach your highest goals and aspirations. 
Seek for wisdom at the highest levels from the Highest Sources. 
Raise your arms high and say "Yes, Yes, YES!" 
Acknowledge the Power of the Thunderbolt of Insight  that Shatters All Ignorance and Illusions. 
Glory Be to Those on High! Please Guide Us Wisely. 
"It is not the talking but the walking that will bring us to heaven."  - Matthew Henry
"If you are seeking creative ideas, go out walking.  Angels whisper to a man when he goes for a walk."  - Raymond Inmon
We can reach for the stars and we must remain grounded, centered, and in touch with the here and now of the earth. 
Consider how plants move both up (branches, stems, leaves) and down (roots) to grow and survive. 
Consider how you must push down (root) on one foot as your other foot rises up to make walking possible. 

 

 

4.  Finding the Constellation Amongst the Stars
      Turn and Find the Stars of the Big Dipper    
      Reach Up to Grab the Stars of Orion      

 

The Fourth Movement involves twisting at the waist towards the back and raising one hand to the sky and keeping the back of the other hand on the lower back. 
If you find turning or twisting to the side difficult or uncomfortable while walking, then just stop walking and do the movement while standing still in one place. 
The ability to sense, identify and recognize useful patterns in complex arrays of information or things is a considerable and valuable power of our intellects and skill of our senses. 

I find that I must slow down the walking pace when doing this movement.  I often need to correct the movement direction slightly after turning to the side. 
Place the cane in the right hand with the crook end closer to the hand.   
A.   Draw both hands to the center of the body and extend the arms forward. 
      As you inhale, draw the right hand back and down. 
      As the right hand pulls back the left hand raises up and forward.
      Turn the head and gaze at the crook end of the cane in the lowered right hand. 
      Twist the torso towards the right side. 
      Move softly and gently. 
      Exhale and relax into the stretch. 
      As you slowly inhale, gradually lift the torso to the center.
      Face forward. 
      Draw the right arm in an upward arc from the low right towards the center of the body. 
B.  As you exhale, begin to twist the upper body to the left side.
      Draw the right arm in an upward arc from center of the body to the high left and behind the body. 
      Gaze through the crook end of the cane held back and high to the left side.   
      Draw the left hand behind the back and place the back of the left hand on the center of the lower back (Ming Men point). 
      As you exhale and twist to the left side tense the musculature of the right shoulder of the raised hand and the opposite side right oblique muscles. 
      At the end of the exhale, squeeze the cane with your right hand.   
As you begin to inhale, begin to untense and relax the musculature, and repeat (A) the twisting to the right side and gazing down to the lower right side. 
Repeat this pattern of turning from side to side, gazing down (right) (A) and gazing up (left) (B) for up to eight repetitions. 

Rest as needed and continue walking at a comfortable pace. 

Repeat the exercise pattern while holding the cane in the left hand. 
A.  Twist to the left as you inhale and gaze low and back to the left at the crook end of the cane as you inhale, with right arm extended high. 
      Exhale at the lowest position of the left hand. 
      Inhale as you draw back to the center of the body. 
B.  Twist to the right as you exhale and gaze high to the right and back through the crook end of the cane held in the left hand.
      The the right hand moves in a circle around to the lower back, and the back of the palm rests on the lower back.      
       As you exhale and twist to the right side tense the musculature of the left shoulder of the raised hand and the opposite side left oblique muscles. 
      At the end of the exhale, squeeze the cane with your left hand.   
Repeat this pattern of turning from side to side, gazing down (left) (A) and gazing up (right) (B) for up to eight repetitions. 

Rest as needed and continue walking at a comfortable pace. 

If you are doing this movement from a still standing position, take a shoulder width stance and perform the movements as described above. 


Themes for reflection or contemplation, while walking, after doing Exercise Four:  

"To find new things, take the path you took yesterday."  - John Burroughs 
The ability to sense, identify and recognize useful patterns in complex arrays of information or things is a considerable and valuable power of our intellects and skill of our senses. 
"Perhaps the truth depends on a walk around the lake."  - Wallace Stevens
"The place where you lose the trail is not necessarily the place where it ends."  - Tom Brown, Jr. 
"When your walking along naturally, you're walking in the harmony of the Unborn."  -  Bankei 
"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe."  - John Muir  
It takes a child about five years to understand and use a vocabulary of around 5,000 words.  The child is recognizing patterns of usage of complex sounds and activities of the family. 

 

 

5.  Harnessing the Power of Nine Oxen
      Dragging a Cow by Its Tail     
      Nine Oxen Pull the Cart          

 

The Fifth Movement involves extending one arm forward and one arm back, clenching the fists, and the twisting to the forward arm side and looking backwards. 
Although trained athletes are capable of great feats of strength, most people use their minds, leverage, inventions, machines, teamwork, and creativity to multiply their strength to that of nine pulling oxen. 
 

The normal Yi Ji Jing Fifth Movement involves stepping out to a long bow stance, extending one arm forward and one arm back, clenching the fists, and the twisting to the forward arm side and looking backwards. Taking an extended bow stance is not possible while walking, so if you wish to do this movement in the normal way then follow the very good instructions provided in the book "Yi Jin Jing" compiled by the Chinese Health Qigong Association, 2007, p. 37-42, called "Pulling Nine Cows by Their Tails." 

 

Themes for reflection or contemplation, while walking, after doing Exercise Five:  

"Nothing can withstand the power of the human will if it is willing to stake its very existence to the extent of its purpose."  - Benjamin Disraeli     
"I can only meditate when I am walking.  When I stop, I cease to think; my mind works only with my legs."  - Jean Jacques Rousseau, Confessions 
"I think that the moment my legs begin to move, my thoughts begin to flow."  -  Henry David Thoreau 
"Let no one be deluded that a knowledge of the path can substitute for putting one foot in front of the other."  - M. C. Richards  
"When you have worn out your shoes, the strength of the shoe leather has passed into the fiber of your body.  I measure your health by the number of shoes you have worn out."  - Ralph Waldo Emerson 
"If you want to know if your brain is flabby, feel your legs."  - Bruce Barton   
 

 

 

6.  The Diving Eagle Spreads His Talons
      Showing Claws and Flashing Wings     
      Showing Talons and Spreading Wings           

 

Description

 

Themes for reflection or contemplation, while walking, after doing Exercise Six:  

"Walks: The body advances, while the mind flutters around it like a bird."  - Jules Renard 
"We are kindred all of us, killer and victim, predator and prey, me and the sly coyote, the soaring buzzard, the elegant gopher snake, and trembling cottontail, the foul worms that feed on our entrails; all of them, all of us. Long live diversity, long live the earth!"  - Edward Abbey 

 

 

7.  Nine Demons Draw Their Swords 
      Nine Devils Drawing Daggers     
      Nine Ghosts Unsheathe Their Swords            

 

Description

 

Themes for reflection or contemplation, while walking, after doing Exercise Seven:  

"Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal."  -  Henry Ford  
"Take a walk on the wild side.- Lou Reed  
"Our way is not soft grass, it's a mountain path with lots of rocks.  But it goes upward, forward, toward the sun."  - Ruth Westheimer
"A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world."  - Paul Dudley White 
 

 

 

8.  Loading and Unloading Bags of Rice 
      Three Plates Fall to the Floor     
      Squatting to Lift the Bags of Grain             

 

Description

 

Themes for reflection or contemplation, while walking, after doing Exercise Eight:  

"A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world."  - Paul Dudley White 

 

 

9.  The Blue Dragon Holds the Pearl in Her Claws 
      Green Dragon Extends Claws       
      Azure Dragon Stretches Its Claws              

 

Description

 

Themes for reflection or contemplation, while walking, after doing Exercise Nine:  

"Let no one be deluded that a knowledge of the path can substitute for putting one foot in front of the other."  - M. C. Richards  
 

 

10.  The Tiger Pounces on Its Prey 
         Hungry Tiger Leaps on Its Prey       
         Crouching Tiger Springs on Its Prey              

 

Description

 

Themes for reflection or contemplation, while walking, after doing Exercise Ten:  

"Let no one be deluded that a knowledge of the path can substitute for putting one foot in front of the other."  - M. C. Richards  
 

 

11.  Bowing Before the Enlightened Ones
        Deep Bows Before the Buddha         
        Bowing in Salutation              

 

Description

 

Themes for reflection or contemplation, while walking, after doing Exercise Eleven:  

"Let no one be deluded that a knowledge of the path can substitute for putting one foot in front of the other."  - M. C. Richards   

 

 

12.  Scooping Up the Grain
        Shake Head and Wag Tail         
        Wagging the Tail              

 

Description

 

Themes for reflection or contemplation, while walking, after doing Exercise Twelve:  

"Let no one be deluded that a knowledge of the path can substitute for putting one foot in front of the other."  - M. C. Richards  
 

 

 

 

 

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