Tara
Drolma, Green Tārā, White Tara, Liberator, Star Goddess, Savioress, Protector
Bodhisattva, Maha-Devi, Divine Feminine, The Mother, Shakti
A Buddhist Goddess Worshipped in Tibet and India

   
Bibliography     Quotations     Prayers     Mantra     Audio    

Praises for the Twenty One Taras     Iconography     Initiation    

Altar     Sadhana     Daily Rituals     Related Goddesses 

Goddesses     Tantra     Buddhism     Paramitas     Yoga

Cloud Hands Blog         

 

Research by
Michael P. Garofalo
Valley Spirit Yoga, Red Bluff, California

 

White Tara
 

 

 

Tārā Studies
Bibliography, Links, Guides, Resources
Tārā, Green Tara, Drolma, White Tara, Liberator, Savioress, Protector, Star Goddess, Maha Devi, Bodhisattva
A Buddhist Goddess in Tibet and India

Linked to:  Devi Tara, Kali, Mahavidyas,
Mahadevi, Nairatmya, Parvati, Kuan Yin,
                   Paranasabari, Neel Saraswati, Vajrayogini, Lakshmi

 

Advice for Living the Good Life


Alphabetical Index to the Cloud Hands Website 


Altars for Tara


Ananda Dharma Center 


 

 

Audio Recordings For Tara Devotees


Green Tara Liturgy, Chanted by Lama Wangchuk.  Audio CD. 


Green Tara and Guru Yoga Liturgy (1988) by Bardor Tulku Rinpoche 


Green Tara: With Bardor Rinpoche and Umdze Lodro Samphel.  Audio-CD, 61:30 minutes.   "Green Tara, Great Mother & Liberator It is said that Green Tara was emanated from the tears of compassion of Chenrezik. She is known as the Great Mother and Great Liberator of beings from samsara. Green in color, she is associated with Amoghasiddhi, the Karma family, the wind element and also with motion. Her special attributes are her speed and ability to protect beings from fears and dangers."   Source 2


Guru Yoga Green Tara Liturgy-slow version (1988) by Yeshe Namdag  


Mandala Dance of the 21 Praises of Tara.  By Prema Dasara and Anahata Iradah.  CD with Text.  "
The Mandala Dance of the 21 Praises of Tara is a ritual offered by groups of dancers worldwide as a prayer of peace, protection, wisdom and capability. It is a practice of empowerment and blessing. Based on an ancient Tibetan practice of praising and embodying the Great Goddess Tara, the Mother of Compassion and Wisdom, the dance was created by Prema Dasara . Through the Tara Dhatu Student Teacher Program it is now taught in and shared by an array of student teachers.  His Holiness the Dalai Lama and many Great Lamas of all the lineages of Tibetan Buddhism have given their blessing and offered their prayers that this dance be shared as widely as possible.  For more information about the Mandala Tara Dance explore the Tara Dhatu site."


Mandala of the Enlightened Feminine.  By Lama Tsultrim Allione.  5 CD set. 


Red Tara: An Open Door to Bliss and Ultimate Awareness.  By H.E. Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche and Chagdud Khadro.  Includes the concise English Tara practice and the audio book Red Tara Commentary.  2 CDs. 


Red Tara Meditations: Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche, Audio CD 


Songs of Tara  Devotional Music to the Goddess of Liberation.  Sounds True, 2011.  Audio CD.   VSCL.  Includes many chants of Tara's mantra.  VSCL.  Review.


Twenty-One Praises of Tara Liturgy (1990) by Yeshe Namdag

 

 

Goddess Tara Audio            Goddess Tara Audio


 

 


Awakening the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for the Western World  By Lama Surya Das.  New York, Broadway Books, 1997.  Index, recommended reading, 414 pages.  ISBN: 0767901576.  VSCL. 


Awakening the Buddhist Heart: Integrating Love, Meaning, and Connection into Every Part of Your Life  By Lama Surya Das.  New York, Broadway Book, 2000.  Index, 256 pages.  ISBN: 9780767902779.  VSCL.   


Awakening to the Sacred: Creating a Personal Spiritual Life 
 By Lama Surya Das.  New York, Broadway Books, 1999.   Resources, 382 pages.  ISBN: 0767902750.  VSCL. 


Black Tara Images from Google 


Blue Tara, Dakini Vajrayogini, Khadga Yogini, Buddhist Tantric Goddess 


Bodhisattva of Compassion: The Mystical Tradition of Kuan Yin.  By John Blofeld.  Shambhala Publications, Boulder, Colorado, 1977


Buddha Is as Buddha Does: The Ten Original Practices for Enlightened Living  By Lama Surya Das.  HarperOne, Reprint Edition, 2008.  288 pages.  ISBN: 0060859539. 


Buddha Standard Time: Awakening to the Infinite Possibilities of Now  By Lama Surya Das.  Harper One, 2012.  224 pages.  ISBN: 006177457X. 


Buddhism in Northern California 


Buddhism for Beginners  By the Venerable Thubten Chodron.  Snow Lion Publications, 2001.  160 pages.  ISBN: 1559391537. 


Buddhist Deities: Bodhisattvas of Compassion 


Buddhist Goddesses of India  By Miranda Shaw.  Princeton, New Jersey, Princeton University Press, 2006.  Bibliography, notes, index, 571 pages.  ISBN:  0691127581.  VSCL. 


Ceremonial Work with Tara


Cloud Hands Blog.  By Mike Garofalo.  Online since 2005.  A blog with reflections, notes, suggestions, bibliographies, references, questions and answers, links and quotations about Gardening, Mysticism, Walking, Tai Chi, Chi Kung, Yoga and The Eight Ways.   
Posts regarding The Goddess, Tara, Tantra, Yoga and Buddhism


The Cult of Tara: Magic and Ritual in Tibet  By Stephan Beyer.  Berkeley, University of California Press, 1978.  Index, bibliography, notes, 542 pages.  ISBN: 9780520036352.  VSCL.  The Praises to the Twenty One Taras is found on pages 211-214.  Online Version Review by Christopher Bell in 2004. 

 

Dali Lama.  Tenzin Gyatso (1935-)  His Holiness the Fourteenth Dalai Lama.  H. H. Dali Lama.

     How to Practice: The Way to a Meaningful Life, 2003. 

     Deity Yoga: In Action and Performance Tantra, 1987.

 


Deconstructing Yeshe Tsogyal, Tibet's Amazing "Mother of Knowledge"  By Vicki Noble. 


Deity Yoga: In Action and Performance Tantra.  By the Dalai Lama.  Snow Lion Publications, 1987.  ISBN: 0937938505.


The Double Goddess: Women Sharing Power.  By Vicki Noble.  Rochester, Vermont, Inner Traditions, 2003.


Empowerment Ritual for the Worship of Tara


The Encyclopedia of Tibetan Symbols and Motifs.  By Robert Beer.  Boston, Shambhala, 1999.


Essential Tibetan Buddhism.  By Robert A. F. Thurman.  Edison, New Jersey, Castle Books, 1995.  Notes, 317 pages.  ISBN: 0785808728.  VSCL. 


The Good Life


Goddesses 


Goddess Tara 


The Goddess Tara  The most ancient living worship of God the Mother. 


Green Tara Images from Google 


Green Tara Initiation  By Sun-Inn Shih


Green Tara Mantra 


Green Tara Mantra - Windmind Buddhist Meditation


Green Tara: Notes for Performing Her Puja.  By Drea Bradley. 
 

Green Tara Puja Commentary by Khempo Yurmed Tinly Rinpoche 


Green Tara Sadhana, Daily Worship, Rituals


Green Tara: Two Meditation Practices  
 

Guided Meditations on the Stages of the Path.  By Bhikshuni Thubten Chodron.  Foreword by H.H. the Dalai Lama.  Book and an audio CD with 14 hours of guided meditations.  Ithaca, New York, Snow Lion Publications, 2007.  Glossary, bibliography, 220 pages.  ISBN: 101559392819.  VSCL. 


Heart: Quotations, Readings, Notes, Yoga


Himalaya: The Secret of the Golden Tara  By Dieter Glogowski.  Cucher, 2007.  191 pages.  ISBN: 3765816345. 


Hindu Goddesses: Visions of the Divine Feminine in the Hindu Religious Tradition.  By David R. Kingsley.   University of California Press, 1988.   ISBN:0520063392.


The Hindus: An Alternative History  By Wendy Doniger.  New York, Penguin Books, 2009.  Index, bibliography, notes, 779 pages.  ISBN: 9780143116691.  VSCL. 


Homages and Praises: A View on Buddhism 


Homages to the Twenty One Taras


How to Free Your Mind: Tara the Liberator.  By Bhikshuni Thubten Chodron.  Ithaca, New York, Snow Lion Publications, 2005.  Glossary, bibliography, 224 pages.  ISBN: 1559392266.  VSCL. 


How to Practice: The Way to a Meaningful Life  By H. H. Dali Lama.   His Holiness the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (1935-).  Atria Books, 2003.  240 pages.  ISBN: 0743453360. 


Images for Black Tara from Google


Images for Green Tara from Google


Images for Red Tara from Google


Images for Tara Goddess from Google


Images for White Tara from Google 


Images for Yellow Tara from Google 


Initiation Ritual for the Worship of Tara


In Praise of Tara: Songs to the Saviouress.  By Martin Wilson.  Wisdom Publications, 1992.  496 pages.  ISBN: 0861711092. 


Introduction to Tantra : The Transformation of Desire  By Lama Thubten Yeshe (1935-1984).  Edited by Jonathan Landaw.  Foreword by Philip Glass.  Somerville, Massachusetts, Wisdom Publications, 3rd Edition, 1987, 2001.  Glossay, reading list, index, 167 pages.  ISBN: 0861711629.  Tibetan Buddhist Tantric interpretation of using the power of desire to energize and boost spiritual progress.  VSCL.    


Kali and Tara   


The Life of Atisha (980-1054)


The Life of Atisha - Wikipedia


Lion's Roar Dharma Center   Sacramento, California 


Lives and Liberation of Princess Mandarava: The Indian Consort of Padmasambhava  By Lama Chonam and Sangye Khandro. 


Longing for Darkness: Tara and the Black Madonna  By China Galland.  Penguin Books, 2007.  432 pages.  ISBN: 0140195661. 


Mother of Knowledge: The Enlightenment of Ye-shes mTshr-rgyal.  By Tarthang Tulku.  Dharma Publishing, 1983.


Nairatmya  Tibetan Buddha, "Lady of Emptiness" or "She Who Has Realized Selflessness."

 

 

 

Names of Tara:

Arya Tara     Sanskrit   Noble Liberator, Enlightened Savior

Cintācakra   Tibetan   Noble Wish Fulfilling Chakra, Wheel of Liberation, Mind-Chakra, White Tara

Devi Tara   Sanskrit 

Dölma Dolkar   Tibetan   White Tara

Drölma (Sgrol-ma)    Tibetan   She who saves, Savioress, Tara

Nairatrmya   Tibetan 

Neel Saraswati   Sanskrit, India

Ozer Chenma   Tibetan  

Pagma Drolma   Tibetan   Noble Liberator, Enlightened Savior

Paranasabari   Parna Shawari   India 

Sgrol-ma (Dölma)   Tibetan  She who saves, The Liberator

Tara Sönam Tobché   Tibet   Goddess (Lady, Mother) liberator who brings good fortune and prosperity.  [Praise #3] 

Tara, Tārā, Taaraa    Sanskrit   India   Star, planet, pupil of the eye; to cross, to traverse, to escape, Savioress.

Tarani Bosatsu   Japan

Tuoluo   China 

Yeshe Tsogyal   Tibetan   Mother of Knowledge 

Yudon Drolma   Tibet 

 

 

 

One Old Druid's Final Journey   Notebooks of the Librarian of Gushen Grove.  By Mike Garofalo. 


Open Heart, Clear Mind  By the Venerable Thubten Chodron.  Snow Lion Publications, 1990.  224 pages.  ISBN: 0937938874. 


The Origin of Tara Tantra.  By Jo Nang Taranatha.  Translated by David Templeman.  Library of Tibetan Works and Archives, 2007.  136 pages.  ISBN: 8186470662.  Review


Lama Palden Drolma, Sukhasiddhi Foundation, Farifax, California


The Practice of the Goddess Green Tara.  By H. E. Chogye Trichen Rinpoche. 


Praises and Requests to the Twenty-One Taras.  From the Venerable Thubten Chodron's Pearl of Wisdom, Book II


Praises of the Twenty One Taras


Praise to the 21 Taras - Tibetan Prayer Flag


Pearl Of Wisdom Book 2: Buddhist Prayers and Practices  Compiled and translated by the Venerable Thubten Chodron (1950-). 
Sravasti Abbey, 5th Edition, 1988.  83 pages.  ISBN: 0985849819. 

 

 

                                               

 

 

Ratna Ling Retreat Center    Near Gualala, California 


Red Tara Commentary: Instructions for the Concise Practice Known as Red Tara - An Open Door to Bliss.  By Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche.  Padma Publishing, 1998.  ISBN: 1881847047.


Red Tara Images from Google 


The Religion and Philosophy of the Veda and Upanishads.   By Arthur Berriedale Keith.  Delhi, India, Motilal Banarsidass Pubs., 1925, 2007.  Two Volumes, Chapters 1-29, Detailed Index, 683 pages.  Published in 1925 by Harvard University Press.  ISBN: 9788120806443.  VSCL. 


The Religion of the Veda.  By Herman Oldenberg.  Translated by Shridhar B. Shrotri.  "Die Religion des Veda."  Delhi, India, Motilal Banarsidass Pub., 1988, 2004.  Originally published in 1894 and revised in 1916.  Index, notes, 359 pages.  ISBN: 8120803922.  VSCL. 


Sadhana: Daily Rituals in Honor of Arya Tara 


A Sadhana for Arya Tara.   By Michael P. Garofalo. 


Seeking Mahadevi: Constructing the Indentities of the Hindu Great Goddess  Edited by Tracey Pintchman.  State University of New York Press, 2001.  268 pages.  ISBN: 0791450082. 


Shakti Mantras: Tapping into the Great Goddess Energy Within  By Thomas Ashley-Farrand.  Ballantine Books, 2003.  272 pages.  ISBN: 0345443047. 


Shambhala: Sacred Path of the Warrior.  By Chogyam Trungpa.  Edited by Carolyn Rose Gimian.  Shambhala, 1988.  Reissue Edition.  202 pages.  ISBN:  0877732647.  VSCL.   


Shri Tara Devi  Notes on the ancient Indian (Hindu) Goddess Tara Devi 


Skillful Grace: Tara Practice for Our Times  By Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche (1921-1996) and Trulshik Rinpoche Adeu.  Edited by Marcia Binder Schmidt.  Translated by Erik Pema Kunsang.  Foreword by Tara Bennett-Goleman.  North Atlantic Books, 2007.  192 pages.  ISBN: 9627341614.  Review


Sky Dancer: The Secret Life and Songs of the Lady Yeshe TsogyalBy Keith Dowman.


Songs of Tara  Devotional Music to the Goddess of Liberation.  Sounds True, 2011.  Audio CD.   VSCL. 


Statues of Tara 

 

Lama Surya Das (1950-), Jeffrey Miller

     Website Home Page

     Biography

     Awakening the Buddha Within: Tibetan Wisdom for the Western World, 1998. 

     Awakening the Buddhist Heart: Integrating Love, Meaning, and Connection into Every Part of Your Life, 2001.   

     Awakening to the Sacred: Creating a Personal Spiritual Life, 1999.

     Buddha Is as Buddha Does: The Ten Original Practices for Enlightened Living, 2008. 

     Buddha Standard Time: Awakening to the Infinite Possibilities of Now, 2012.  

 

Tantric Visions of the Divine Feminine: The Ten Mahavidyas  By David R. Kinsley.  University of California Press, 1997.  289 pages.  ISBN: 0520204999. 


Tantric Yoga and the Wisdom Goddesses  By David Frawley, Ph.D..  Lotus Press, 1994.  260 pages.  ISBN: 0910261393. 


Tara    Khandaro.Net is an outstanding website about Tibetan Buddhism.  The Tara webpage provides a detailed descriptions of the manifestations of Tara named by colors, e.g., Green Tara, White Tara, Red Tara, etc. 


Tara 


Tara: A Manifestation of the Divine Feminine.  By Lama Palden Drolma.  July, 2002. 


Tara and the Tantric Body  By Tara Knowland. 


Tara Bibliography 


Tara in Buddhism


Tara Devi - Wikipedia 


Tara Dhatu: Dance the Goddess  
Based on an ancient Tibetan practice of praising and embodying the Great Goddess Tara, the Mother of Compassion and Wisdom, the dance was created by Prema Dasara.  Dance examples: Wisdom in Action, Tara Dhatu, Tara Dance.   Dance the Goddess UTube Channel. 


Tara: Goddess of Many Faces


Tara: Goddess of Peace and Protection 


Tara: Her Origins and Development.  By Dharmachari Purna.  From the "Western Buddhist Review" Volume 2.  Includes a bibliography. 


Tara Mandala.  Led by Lama Tsultrim Allione.  In Pagosa Springs, Colorado. 


Tara Puja.  By Drea Bradley. 


Tara Puja: The New Kadampa Tradition


Tara's Enlightened Activity: Commentary on The Praises to the Twenty-One Taras.  By Khenchen Palden Sherab and Khenpo Tsewang Dongyal.  The translation of the "Twenty-one Praises of Tara" (pp. 51-174) is by Anna Orlova.  The commentary on each Praise ( pp. 51-174) includes word (outer) meanings, general (inner) meanings, hidden (secret) meaning and ultimate (very secret) meaning. Snow Lion Publications, 2007.  242 pages.  ISBN: 1559392878.  VSCL. 


Tara Space: Practice Texts Online 


Tara's Refuge   Mt. Shasta, California


Tara: The Feminine Divine  By Bokar Rinpoche.  San Francisco, California, Clear Point Press, 1999.  Index, glossary, 176 pages.  ISBN: 9781930164000.  VSCL.   


Tara the Liberator.  By Kyabje Lama Zopa Rinpoche. 


Tara: The Supreme Goddess  By Pushpendra Kumar.  South Asia Books, 1992.  254 pages.  ISBN: 8121700639. 


Tara - The New World Encyclopedia 


Teachings at Amitabha and White Tara Initiations and Retreat   By Kyabje Lama Zopa Rinpoche in Taiwan, 2007.  Text and audio.


The Ten Great Cosmic Powers.   By Sri Shankaranarayanan.  Dipti Publications, 1972.  ISBN: 8185208387.

 


Thubten Chodron (1950-)   The Venerable Bhikshuni Thubten Chodron 

     The Venerable Thubten Chodron's Home Page 

     Sravasti Abbey   Newport, Washington (1 hour north of Spokane)   The Abbess is The Venerable Thubten Chodron. 

     How to Free Your Mind: Tara the Liberator, 2005. 

     Guided Meditations on the Stages of the Path, 2007.

     Open Heart, Clear Mind, 1990.

     Pearl Of Wisdom Book 2: Buddhist Prayers and Practices, 1988. 

     Buddhism for Beginners, 2001.  

 


Transforming the Heart: The Buddhist Way to Joy and Courage  By Gesha Jampa Teqchok.   Snow Lion Publications, 1999.  228 pages.  ISBN: 1559390999. 


Traveller in Space: In Search of Female Identity in Tibetan Buddhism
. By June Campbell.  New Yor, George Braziller, 1996.


Twenty One Praises to Jetsun Tara.  From Lama Palden Drolma's website. 


Twenty One Verses in Praise of Arya Tara


Twenty One Praises to Tara  Translation as found in The Cult of Tara by Stephan Beyer, pages 211-214.  [Diacritical marks omitted, and verses numbered by this editor.]  Beyer's source while he was in  Dalhousie, India was Drukpa Kagyu, Ven. VIII Kamtrul Rinpoche Donju Nyingma. 


Vajrapani Institute    Santa Cruz, California


Vajrayāna Buddhism (Devanagari: वज्रयान; Oriya: ବଜ୍ରଯାନ, Tibetan: རྡོ་རྗེ་ཐེག་པ་, rdo rje theg pa; Mongolian: Очирт хөлгөн, Ochirt Hölgön, Chinese: 密宗, mì zōng) is also known as Tantric Buddhism, Tantrayāna, Mantrayāna, Secret Mantra, Esoteric Buddhism and the Diamond Vehicle.


Vajrayogini: Her Visualizations, Rituals, and Forms
.  By Elizabeth English.  Somerville, Massachusetts, Wisdom Publications, 2002.


Vajrayogini


VSCL =  Valley Spirit Center Library, Red Bluff, California 


White Tara


White Tara Images from Google 


White Tara Sadhana, Daily Ritual, Worship


The Wish-Fulfilling Wheel: The Practice of White Tara  By Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche.  Compiled and edited by Karma Sonam Drolma.  Kingston, New York, Rinchen Publications, 2009.  196 pages.  ISBN: 0971455422.  VSCL. 


Yellow Tara Images from Google 


Yoga


 

 

 

Worship to Inculcate the Attributes of Arya Tara (Drolma)
Sadhana: Daily Ritual Worship, Daily Rites, Rituals in Honor of Tara
Daily Spiritual Practices, Scriptural Recitations, Chants, Visualizations   

 

A Brief Sadhana of Green Tara for Daily Practice.  Translated by Guru Lin.   


The Cult of Tara: Magic and Ritual in Tibet  By Stephan Beyer.  Berkeley, University of California Press, 1978.  Index, bibliography, notes, 542 pages.  ISBN: 9780520036352.  VSCL.  The Praises to the Twenty One Taras is found on pages 211-214.  Online Version


Green Tara Mantra - Windmind Buddhist Meditation


Green Tara: Notes for Performing Her Puja.  By Drea Bradley. 
 

Green Tara Puja Commentary by Khempo Yurmed Tinly Rinpoche 


Green Tara: A Short Sadhana of Green Tara    According to the pure and unbroken Gelug lineage tradition of Tibetan Buddhism.  Composed by the First Dali Lama, Gen-dun Drub (1391-1474 CE).  This sadhana practice is intended for those people who have received this Green Tara Kriya Tantra initiation by a qualified teacher. 


Green Tara Sadhana   A daily sadhana of Green Tara, with a color picture on the front cover for easy visualization.  It also contains the Praises to the 21 Taras.   Also suitable as retreat sadhana.


Green Tara Sadhana Search


Guided Meditations on the Stages of the Path.  By Bhikshuni Thubten Chodron.  Foreword by H.H. the Dalai Lama.  Book and an audio CD with 14 hours of guided meditations.  Ithaca, New York, Snow Lion Publications, 2007.  Glossary, bibliography, 220 pages.  ISBN: 101559392819.  VSCL. 


A Long Sadhana of Chittamani Tara.  According to the pure and unbroken lineage of Mahasiddha Tagpu Chang, in the Gelug Tibetan Buddhist Tradition. 


Mantra for Tara 


Meditations on White Tara: A Sadhana


The Practice of Green Tara.  By the Venerable Bardor Tulku Rinpoche.  Spiral bound book, size: 8.5 x 11 inches, 63 pages. 


Prayers for Tara  


Red Tara Sadhana Search


A Sadhana of Jetsun Dolma Arya Tara of the Acacia Forest.  A daily practice of Green Tara.  Written by the First Karmapa, Dusum Khyenpa (1110-1173 CE). 


A Sadhana for Arya Tara.   By Michael P. Garofalo. 


The Tantric Mysticism of Tibet. by John Blofeld.  Prajna Press, Boulder, Colorado, 1982


Tara Puja: The New Kadampa Tradition 


Tara Sadhana - Google Search


Twenty One Verses in Praise of Arya Tara 


White Tara: A Daily Meditation of White Tara 


White Tara:  Meditations on White Tara.  Tibetan Buddhist Monastery, San Francisco.


White Tara Sadhana   Given by the Venerable Lama Thubten Zopa Rinpoche, 1982.  Translated by Barry Clark. 


White Tara Sadhana Search


White Tara: The Daily Practice of the Noble Wish-Fulfilling Chakra (White Tara)  Written by Jamgon Kongtrul Lodro Thaye (1813-1899), one of the Four Regents of the Kagyu lineage of Tibetan Buddhism. 


White Tara: The Noble White TaraVenerable Chöje Lama Phuntsok.


White Tara Unification Sadhana  By Yutang Lin. 


The Wish-Fulfilling Wheel: The Practice of White Tara  By Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche.  Compiled and edited by Karma Sonam Drolma.  One of the most detailed descriptions of a practice session is found in the chapters titled: "The Main Practice: The Development Stage (Kyerim) and The Completion Stage (Dzogrim)", pp. 38-83.  Karthar 2009

 

 

My Understanding of a Sadhana Practice to Honor Arya Tara (Drolma) includes:

1.  Having a proper and respectful setting for the practice.  Having a worthy altar and implements of worship.  Lighting incense and/or candle.  Refreshing water offering.  Having appropriate seasonal or spiritual settings on the altar.  Being clean and wearing ritual clothing or jewelry. 

2.  Cultivating an attitude of generosity, kindness, compassion, love, faith, enthusiasm and respect.  Inculcation of the Four Immeasurables: love, compassion, joy and impartiality. 
Karthar 2009, p. 33-35. 

3.  Seeking Refuge in the Three Jewels (Buddha, Dharma, Sangha; Enlightenment, Teaching, Spiritual Friends; Mind, Will, Society). 
Karthar 2009, p.27-31. 

4.  Respect for the worthy and ancient lineage (e.g., Hindu, Buddhist, Pagan) of your practice rituals and a respect for the spiritual traditions.  Following the specific methods and practices received during your initiation or empowerment.  Integrate worthwhile aspects from various daily worship practices. 
Karthar 2009, p.13-19. 

5.  Acknowledging your faults, shortcomings, and obstacles.  Being humble.  Resolving to improve your lifestyle, become wiser, and strive towards enlightenment. 

6.  Making offerings to Tara either in mind, through the eight Offering Goddesses, and/or with actual altar gift preparations.  The offerings include: drinking water, bathing water, flowers, incense, light, perfumed water, food, and music.   
Karthar 2009, p. 50-55; Torma, p. 84-89. 

7.  Contemplation of Emptiness, Inter-Dependent Arising, Appearances and Insubstantiality of Things, Non-Dual Awareness.  
Refer to The Heart Sutra

8.  Creation of sacred space, protective circle, Radiant White Crystal Gem House of the Eight Realms, Sun/Star/Illumination Field of Protection, Guardians of the South.   
Karthar 2009, p. 39-42. 

9.  Complex, detailed, heartfelt, colorful, elaborate, symbolic, and grand visualizations of Arya Tara
Karthar 2009, p. 43-49. 

10.  Heartfelt and concentrated recitations of mantras

11.  Becoming one with the beautiful, powerful, exemplary, and wise qualities of Tara. 

12.  Closing, dissolving, and releasing the visualizations of Arya Tara. 

13.  Silent Meditation, Quiet Time, Vipassana

14.  Closing the Circle of Protection, Releasing the Guardians of the Quarters, Properly Leaving the Altar Area

15.  Bringing the realized Tara consciousness into your daily life while following the Eightfold Path of Right Ways

 

 

 

 

 

White Tara

 

 

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Quotations

Tara, Green Tara, White Tara, Liberator, Savioress, Protector, Star Goddess, Maha Devi, Bodhisattva
Buddhist Goddess in Tibet and Nepal
Linked to:  Devi Tara, Kali, Mahavidyas,
Mahadevi, Parvati, Kuan Yin, Paranasabari, Neel Saraswati, Lakshmi

 

"In Hinduism, the goddess Tara (Bengali:দেবী তারা মা )(Sanskrit: Tārā, Devanagari: तारा) meaning "star" is the second of the Dasa (ten) Mahavidyas or "Great Wisdom [goddesses]", Tantric manifestations of Mahadevi, Kali, or Parvati.  As the star is seen as a beautiful but perpetually self-combusting thing, so Tara is perceived at core as the absolute, unquenchable hunger that propels all life.  Some researchers believe Paranasabari is another name for Hindu Goddess Tara, and Tara is the only female goddess not only worshiped in India but also Mongolia and Tsarist Russia.  Again in Buddhist religion incidentally, Paranasabari is depicted as attendant of Buddhist deity of same name, Tara.  The similarities in appearances between Kali and Tara are striking and unmistakable. They both are described as standing upon a supine Shiva in inert or corpse like form. However, while Kali is described as black, Tara is described as blue. Both wear minimal clothing, however Tara wears a tiger skin skirt, while Kali wears only a girdle of severed human arms. Both wear a necklace of severed human heads and the previously mentioned girdle of arms. Both have a lolling tongue, and blood oozes from their mouths. Their appearances are so strikingly similar that it is easy to mistake one for the other. Indeed, they are often said to be manifestations of each other; for example, in their thousand-name hymns they share many epithets as well as having each others names. Tara, for example, is called Kalika, Ugra-kali, Mahakali, and Bhadra-kali. Tara is said to be more approachable to the devotee (Bhakta) or Tantrika because of her maternal instincts; however a large population of Bengali Hindus approach Kali herself as "Ma" or "mother"."
Tara Devi - Wikipedia  

 

 

"Tara or Arya Tara, also known as Jetsun Dolma, is a female Bodhisattva typically associated with Tibetan Buddhism. She is the "mother of liberation", and represents the virtues of success in work and achievements.  As Mahatara, Great Tara, she is the supreme creatrix and mother of all the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas. Tara is the Feminine Goddess Archetype in Hindu Mythology. Tara governs the Underworld, the Earth and the Heavens, birth, death and regeneration, love and war, the seasons, all that lives and grows, the Moon cycles - Luna - feminine - creation. Typically Tara is seen as a slender and beautiful woman of white complexion, long golden hair and blue eyes. Her animals are the sow, mare, owl and raven.  She is the most popular figure in the Tibetan pantheon of deities, the beautiful goddess Tara, whose name in means 'Star' - originated in Indian Hinduism as the Mother Creator.  In later Hindu scriptures, she is depicted as one of the eight major aspects of the Divine Feminine Principle, a loving manifestation in contrast to the fiercesome Kali.  Like a star that perpetually consumes its own energy, Tara represents the never-ending desires that fuel all life.  Adopted by Buddhism from Hinduism by the 3rd century B.C. , Tara appears in Buddhism, Jainism, and particularly, Tibetan Lamaism, as a complex array of manifestations: goddess of ascetism and mysticism, mother creator, protectress of all humans as they cross the sea of life."
Goddess Tara

 

 

"Goddess Tara is probably the oldest goddess who is still worshipped extensively in modern times. Tara originated as a Hindu goddess, a Great Goddess -- the Mother Creator, representing the eternal life force that fuels all life.  There are many embodiments of Tara, but the best known are the White Tara and the Green Tara.  The peaceful, compassionate White Tara gently protects and brings long life and peace. The more dynamic goddess, Green Tara is the "Mother Earth", and a fierce goddess who overcomes obstacles, and saves us from physical and spiritual danger.  In Sanskrit, the name Tara means Star, but she was also called She Who Brings Forth Life, The Great Compassionate Mother, and The Embodiment of Wisdom, and the Great Protectress.  Adopted by Buddhism, she become the most widely revered deity in the Tibetan pantheon.   In Buddhist tradition, Tara is actually much greater than a goddess -- she is a female Buddha, an enlightened one was has attained the highest wisdom, capability and compassion. . . one who can take human form and who remains in oneness with the every living thing."
-   Tara: Goddess of Peace and Protection 

 

 

"Blue or Ugra Tara (Khadga Yogini or Vajrayogini) is a dreadful manifestation of Tara and has a ferocious form.  She was overpowered by Padmasambhava.  The deity Vajrayogini, or Vijeshvari, is sixteen years old, radiantly beautiful with a youthful freshness and vitality, and her face bears an intense expression reflecting her passionate nature.  The Yogini's nudity demonstrates her freedom from ordinary conceptions and appearances, which bind us ordinary mortals.  She wears a five-skull crown.  These five skulls symbolize the first five perfections attainable on the Vajrayana path which are: generosity, discipline, patience, effort and meditative concentration.  Her red body is ablaze with the heat of yogic fire surrounded by the flames of wisdom.  She has three eyes, symbolizing her ability to see past, present and future simultaneously.  In her left hand, she holds a skull cup filled with swirling brains and entails of the enemies of the Dharma and in her right hand is the kartri, a curved flaying knife, the instrument used to annihilate these enemies.  She wears a garland of 50 human skulls.  She is adorned with six kinds of ornaments, as is usually the case with tantric divinities symbolizing their perfection in the six paramitas.  A Khatvang staff is seen passing through her shoulder representing her consort Heruka Chakrasamvara.  He long disheveled hair flows downward against the flame filled background symbolizing her unchanging nature as dharmakaya.  Her breasts are full with nipples erect, symbolizing the arousal of desire and indicating Vajrayogini helps those with strong passion to transform it into the realization of great bliss.  Beneath the right leg of the deity is a naked figure, when the sadhaka invokes a certain deity, the deity appears."
Blue Tara, Dakini Vajrayogini

 

 

"Tārā (meaning "Star" or “Saviouress”), also known as Jetsun Dolma in Tibetan, is a popular female deity and Bodhisattva primarily worshiped in Tantrism or Vajrayana Buddhism. Originally a Hindu goddess, Tārā was absorbed into the Buddhist pantheon during the sixth century C.E. and is represented in different forms in Buddhist iconography. Known as a Bodhisattva of compassion, as well as a tantric deity and Mother Goddess, it is said that Tārā guards and protects her devotees their whole lives. She is popularly worshiped for her role in saving her devotees from worldly dangers; great trust and reliance is placed in the ability of Tārā as a savior in times of need.  In Tibet, Tārā is a Tantric deity whose mantra and visualization are used by practitioners of Vajrayana to develop certain inner qualities and understand outer, inner, and secret teachings about compassion, mercy, and emptiness."
Tara - New World Encyclopedia

 

 

"Her Name means "star", and she is said to have been born from the water, like Aphrodite. Thus her iconography may be related to that of Mary, who is called Stella Maris (Star of the Sea) and foam-born Venus/Aphrodite who is represented by the Morning/Evening Star, Venus.  Not only is Aphrodite connected by scholars with Ishtar and Astarte, but some have linked these names etymologically with the name of the Goddess Tara.  What we have here is clearly a very fundamental symbolic - and probably linguistic - matrix of iconography related to the very earliest worship of Our Mother God, which yet remains in continuous practice through the worship of the Goddess Tara, the Bodhisattwa Kuan Yin."
The Goddess Tara  

 

 

"Buddhism has always had a strong feminine spokesperson in the form of Tara, the liberated female principle of enlightenment.  Many people refer to this female Buddha as Green Tara.  In fact, however, like all mothers, Tara has so much to do, so much to give, and is so responsive to the needs of beings that she has many forms and is imaged in twenty-one different colors symbolizing twenty-one aspects and modes of activity.  As White Tara, she is a peaceful presence who heals disease and pacifies discord; as Red Tara, she is a passionate presence who devotes her inexhaustible energy to others' needs.  As Green Tara, she personifies the qualities of protective nurturing earth.  It is taught that Tara helps us help ourselves.  Tara has special meaning in Tibet where she is know as its protectress and is called Mother Tara.  Children are taught to invoke Tara's aide through prayer whenever they feel fearful or anxious.  Every monastery chants her beautiful "Twenty-one Praises of Tara" liturgy every morning as a group in the meditation hall.  As a fully enlightened Buddha, Tara personifies the sacred feminine side of all of us― male and female."
-  Lama Surya Das, Awakening the Buddha Within, p. 246 

 

 

"Tara is a tantric meditation deity whose practice is used by practitioners of the Tibetan branch of Vajrayana Buddhism to develop certain inner qualities and understand outer, inner and secret teachings about compassion and emptiness. Tara is actually the generic name for a set of Buddhas or bodhisattvas of similar aspect. These may more properly be understood as different aspects of the same quality, as bodhisattvas are often considered metaphoric for Buddhist virtues.

The most widely known forms of Tārā are:

There is also recognition in some schools of Buddhism of twenty-one Tārās. A practice text entitled "In Praise of the 21 Tārās", is recited during the morning in all four sects of Tibetan Buddhism."
Tara in Buddhism 

 

 

"It is important to always keep in mind that each aspect of the form of the deity symbolizes a particular important meaning.  Each introduces the ultimate meaning or expresses aspects of ultimate meaning.  Therefore the deity is the meaning.  A deity is not like a form composed of organs, bones, flesh and so on.  It is not subject to limitation and destructibility.  It is a form that transcends these and communicates meaning."
-  Khenpo Karthar Rionpoche, The Wish Fulfilling Wheel, p. 48.    

 

 

"All becomes Emptiness.  From the realm of Emptiness is PAM and from that a lotus; from A is the circle of a moon, above which my own innate mind is a white syllable TĀM.  Light radiates forth from there, makes offerings to the Noble Ones, serves the aim of beings, and is gathered back in, where-upon my mind and the syllable is transformed, and I myself become the holy Cintacakra.  Her body is colored white as an autumn mood, clear as a stainless crystal gem, radiating light.  She has one face, two hands, three eyes.  She has the youth of sixteen years.  Her right hand make the gift-bestowing gesture, and with the thumb and ring finer of her left hand she holds over her heart the stalk of a lotus flower, its petals on the level of her ear, her gesture symbolizing the Buddhas of the three times, a division into three from a single root, taking the form of an open flower in the middle, a fruit on the right, and a new shoot on the left.  Her hair is dark blue, bound up at the back of her neck with long tresses hanging down.  Her breasts are full.  She is adorned with diverse precious ornaments.  Her blouse is of varicolored silk, and her lower robes are of red silk.  The palms of her hands and the soles of her feed each have an eye, making up the seven eyes of knowledge.  She sits straight and firm on the circle of the moon, her legs crossed in the diamond posture.  On the top of her head is a white OM; on her throat is a red ĀH; on her heart, above the circle of a moon, is a white syllable TĀM  marked with a blue HŪM.  From the seed in her heart light radiates forth and, from her natural abode, the holy Cintacakra, surround by hosts of Buddhas and Bodhisattvas, chanting 'OM VAJRA-SAMĀJAH!'  An all chanting 'JAH HŪM BAM HO' they become one with the symbolic being.  Having fully formed himself as the goddess, sealed in her identity and holding her ego, he makes offerings and praises to her."
-  Stephan Beyer, The Cult of Tara, p. 379  [Visualization for the White Tara, Cintacākra]

 

 

"‘Tara’ means ‘Rescuer’. She is so called because she rescues us from the eight outer fears (the fears of lions, elephants, fire, snakes, thieves, water, bondage, and evil spirits), and from the eight corresponding inner fears (the fears of pride, ignorance, anger, jealousy, wrong views, attachment, miserliness, and deluded doubts).  Temporarily Tara saves us from the dangers of rebirth in the three lower realms, and ultimately she saves us from the dangers of samsara and solitary peace.  If we rely upon Mother Tara sincerely and with strong faith she will protect us from all obstacles and fulfill all our wishes. Since she is a wisdom Buddha, and since she is a manifestation of the completely purified wind element, Tara is able to help us very quickly.  If we recite the twenty-one verses of praise we shall receive inconceivable benefits. These praises are very powerful because they are Sutra, the actual words of Buddha. It is good to recite them as often as we can."
Tara Puja: The New Kadampa Tradition 

 

 

"Tara is Wisdom, Compassion and Power
Tara is Swift Protection
Tara is Creative Wisdom
Tara is Impeccable Virtue
Tara is All Victorious
Tara is Sublime Intelligence
Tara is Worthy of Honor
Tara is Invincible Courage 
Tara Destroys Negativity 
Tara is True Refuge 
Tara is Joy and Laughter
Tara is the Distributor of Wealth
Tara is Auspicious Beauty 
Tara is Irresistible Truth
Tara is Ferocious Compassion
Tara is Serene Peace
Tara Destroys Attachment
Tara is Triumphant Joy
Tara is the Transformer of Poison
Tara is the Remover of Sorrow
Tara is Radiant Health
Tara is Complete Enlightenment."
The 21 Praises of Tara
   Tara Dance Sangha of Atlanta
   A Member of Tara Dhatu

 

 

"Because she [Drolma, Tara] has realized this ultimate nature and is indistinguishable from that nature, she can be regarded as a display of that nature.  Therefore, according to the ultimate meaning, Tara is herself the dharmadhatu, the expanse that is the nature of all things without exception.  Because she is not only someone who has realized this nature but is also that which must be realized for enlightenment to take place, she is the sing object of realization of all buddhas.  Therefore, we refer to her as the Mother of All Buddhas."
- Khenpo Kathar Rinpoche, The Wish-Fulfilling Wheel, p. 3

 

 

"The teachings and practice of Tantra are additionally given according to four levels: outer, inner, secret, and very secret.  According to our capabilities and following the instruction of our teachers, we may practice on Tara at any or all of these four.  The simplest approach to Tara's practice is that of the word meaning, or outer meaning. At this simple level we may read the words and think about them, look at the beautiful drawings, and perhaps memorize and recite the words of the
Twenty-one Praises to Tara, in Tibetan or English, as we prefer.  In the general (or inner) meaning, we practice with a visualization, so it is development (or generation stage) practice, or kye rim.  In Vajrayana thee are different techniques for visualization.  The hidden (or secret) meanings of each of the praises to Tara contain instructions on work with the yogas of the body's channels, winds, and essences.  These are referred to as the "completion stages practices with concepts," dzog rim.  The ultimate (or most secret) meaning is the meaning according to the view and practice of the Great Perfection, or Atiyoga, "the completion stage without concepts." 
Tara's Enlightenment Activity, p. 49  Commentary in this book about the Twenty-one Praises to Tara focus primarily and in detail (pp.51-174) on the first two levels for each verse with briefer explanations about the higher two levels. 

 

 

"On a lotus seat, the emblem for the realization of voidness,
The emerald-colored, one-faced, two-armed Lady
In youth's full bloom, right leg out, left drawn in,
Showing the union of wisdom and art.  Homage to you!
Like the outstretched branch of the heavenly turquoise tree,
Your supple right hand makes the boon-granting gesture,
Inviting the wise to a feast of supreme accomplishments,
As if to an entertainment-homage to you!
Your left hand gives us refuge, showing the Three Jewels;
It says, "You people who see a hundred dangers,
Don't be frightened, I shall swiftly save you!"
Homage to you!
Both hands signal with blue utpala flowers,
"Samsaric beings! Cling not to worldly pleasures.
Enter the great city of liberation!"
Flower-goads prodding us to effort.  Homage to you!
-  The First Dalai Lama (1391-1474)

 

 

"Tara also known as Arya Tara or Jetsun Dolma (sgrolma) is very well known in Tibetan Buddhism, Tara is a Buddha with the body of a female. Tara is typically associated with Tantric Practices Varjayana or known as Tibetan Buddhism.  Mother Tara is considered as the "mother of liberation", and she represents the virtues of success in both work and the achievements on oneself. “Tara” is a “Tantric” deity and commonly practiced by practitioners of Tibetan Buddhist also known as Vajrayana since the 7th century C.E., the practice of Mother Tara is to develop a certain inner qualities of one self and to understand the outer, inner and also the secret teachings about both compassion and emptiness.  Tara in fact is actually the “generic” name for a set of Buddha or Bodhisattvas of identical qualities. In Tibetan Buddhism or Varjayana Tara is regarded as a Female Buddha of both compassion and action. She is actually the female aspect of Avalokitesvara / Chenrezig / Kwan Yin and it was widely belief that “Tara” originated his tears. Tara is known as a heavenly deity who always hears the cries of all sentient beings experiencing misery and suffering in samsara.  In Sanskrit Tar means "cross over" as in using an object like “a bridge” to cross over a stream. In the Indian sacred tradition, the word Tara refers to the second means of the “Ten Means” to Realization and as according to Hindu tantra. As a Tarini, “she will carries you across” Tara serves as a bridge for us to get to the path immortality."
Mother Tara 

 

 

" 'In the centre [of the island of gems] is the wish fulfilling tree. Under this, a sadhaka should meditate on himself as being one with Tarini, as bright as the rising sun, the utmost sphere of light, in a place surrounded by beautiful maidens with fans and bells, wafted by a gentle breeze bearing the odour of scent and incense - Todala Tantra, IV'  Tara is quite well known to the West through Her Tibetan manifestations, but some are unaware of the important position She occupies in the Hindu tantrik pantheon. She is the second of the ten Mahavidyas.  Some have attempted to separate the Hindu Tara from the Tibetan Tara, but there is little doubt that She is the same Devi. This is shown in a reference to Tara in the Hindu Tantrarajatantra, where Her mantra is given as Om Tare Tuttare Ture Svaha -- identical to the Tibetan version.  Here Tara takes her form as Kurukulla.  The various other forms are given in Brihad Nila Tantra and Devirahasya, under the names Nilasarasvati, Aniruddha Sarasvati, Ugra Tara, Tarini. Nilasarasvati gives as the fruit of worshipping Her poesy and eloquence. This, aside from clearly relating Nilasarasvati to White Sarasvati, also points to this Goddess being the Shakti of the Letters of the Alphabet, the Matrika Shakti.   She has an important role in Tantrik cosmology because mantra, words, music are considered to be the very source of the cosmos. As Matrika Shakti She deludes the entire human race with Her Maya of letters, and words. This has been expressed in a Tantrik form, but, practically speaking, it is sufficient to say that much hypnosis (Maya) comes about via the medium of words. Millions of people have lost their lives through this power.  Thus Her power and place in the Tantrik pantheon is quite justified, and Her mantra is described as a Siddha-Vidya, the cause of Maya and Englamouring. The background GIF here is the bija mantra of Sarasvati, Aim."
Shri Tara Devi

 

 

"To complete the mantra recitation, we do one million recitations of the root manta (OM TARE TUTTARE TURE SOHA).  One million is the minimum prerequisite that enable us to begin to use the practice to benefit others.  We are talking about doing it in one stretch oftime, such as in retreat.  This is referred to in Tibetan parlance as "on one seat."  This does not mean 10,000 here, 20,000 there, over the years, but in a retreat situation or in one stretch of time.  When a genuine practitioner has properly done ten million repetitons, they should be able to accomplish all four activities to benefit beings (pacifying, enriching, magnetizing, and subduing).  The are then a dorje lobpon, or vajra master.  The vajra master is someone who can manifest the four activities properly and through this bring great benefit to others.  A genuine practitioner is someone who pays sincere attention to the practice and has pure devotion.  These are the qualities every good practitioner should have.  If, on the contrary, one recites the mantra but is distracted or lacks devotion, there will be no such accomplishment."  
-  Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche, The Wish-Fulfilling Wheel: The Practice of White Tara, p.65

 

 

"It was not until the adoption of the Yogachara system, taught by Asanga in the fourth century AD, that the feminine principle began to be venerated in Mahayana Buddhism. Around the sixth century, the goddess Tara was considered as a Sakti of Avalokitesvara (sometimes as his wife). The Chinese pilgrim Xuanzang (seventh century) claimed to have seen many statues of this deity in northern India. However, she was not accepted by followers of the Theravada.  Many legends have sprung up around this goddess. According to one of them she was born in a beam of blue light emanating from one of the eyes of Avalokitesvara; another has her born from a lotus, floating in a tear on his face. It was believed in Tibet in the seventh century that Tara was reincarnated in every virtuous and pious woman: thus two of the wives of King Srong-btsan Sgam-po, Wencheng, who was Chinese, and a Nepalese daughter of Amsuvarman, came to be considered as incarnations of Tara. To differentiate between the two wives, the Tibetans created two distinctive Taras, white for the Chinese, with a full-blown lotus as her emblem, and green for the Nepalese, whose emblem is the blue (half-open) lotus. Each is believed to have been born from an eye of Avalokitesvara (open and half-closed). Hence they came to be considered as symbols of the day (full-blown lotus, eye open) and the night (half-open lotus, eye half-closed). But this couple soon multiplied, and 21 Taras are mentioned."
Buddhist Deities: Bodhisattvas of Compassion

 

 

 

 

Green Tara

 

 

 

The 21 Praises of Tara, Homages to the 21 Taras
Quotations

 

"The Homages to the Twenty-one Taras is the single most important praise of the goddess in the entire literature, and its Tibetan translation is rendered into a meter unusual in its extreme 8-syllable regularity (x x x x x x x x).  Its recitation is thus ideally suited to a low and murmurous chanting, a rising and falling hum that lasts as long as one's breath.  In every ritual where the goddess is praised at all, almost without exception this is the praise that is used.  Thus the monks now visualize that these "praises to the noble Tara, this King of Tantras" are recited not only by the monks themselves but also by all sentient beings, and that the sound arises even from the very elements."
-  Stephan Beyer, The Cult of Tara, p. 211

 

 

"This eulogy to the Twenty-one Taras must be included, since so many Tibetans of all walks of life have it memorized and recite it up and down the mountains, day in and day out.  Tara is the Mother Mary figure for all Tibetans.  So all-encompassing is her presence, she is invoked daily in these main twenty-one forms, though Tibetans believe her to be functioning in limitless forms, for the sake of all beings."
-  Robert Thurman, Essential Tibetan Buddhism, p. 316 

 

 

 

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Praises for the Twenty One Taras
Praises and Requests to the Twenty One Taras
The Twenty One Homages to the Goddess Tara
Twenty One Verses of Praise to Arya Tara 
Homages to the Holy and Noble Goddess Tara

Tara, Green Tara, White Tara, Liberator, Savioress, Protector, Star Goddess, Maha Devi, Bodhisvatta
Buddhist Goddess in Tibet and India
Linked to: Devi Tara, Kali, Mahavidyas,
Mahadevi, Parvati, Kuan Yin, Paranasabari, Neel Saraswati

 

Text     Bibliography     Notes and Commentary

Quotes     Initiation     Audio - UTube

 

It is my hope that the many diligent and creative translators, or their publishers, will be generous enough to share their dharma efforts with folks on a spiritual path who are reading the 21 Praises of Tara on this webpage.  If not, I will promptly remove any quoted material. 

I have purchased nearly all of the books regarding Tara and the 21 Praises cited on this webpage.  I encourage each reader of this webpage to choose and purchase two of these books.  The commentaries on the "Homages to the Twenty One Taras" are invaluable.  Links for each quotation will take you directly to the book from which I quoted the translation, and you can easily purchase the book from Amazon.  If you don't want to purchase one of these fine books, then donate to some worthwhile charity or do some volunteer work.  Any proceeds from this webpage from Amazon sales, probably less than $7.00 per year, will be used to purchase and plant a bare-root tree next January because even trees sing the Praises to Green Tara.  

Hopefully, readers of this webpage will gain a little information about the Noble Liberator Tara, and be inspired to learn more and seek proper initiation by a Buddhist lineage master and follow the wholesome and beneficial practices of this tradition of teachings.  Namaste! 

 

 

1

"OM I prostrate to the noble transcendent liberator.

Homage to Tara swift and fearless
With eyes like a flash of lightning
Lotus-born in an ocean of tears
Of Chenresig, three worlds' protector."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron


"Hail Tara!  Swift One, Champion,
Your glance is like a flash of lighening!
You arise the tear-born stamen
From our Savior's lotus face."
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"OM! Homage to the holy and noble Tara!  
Homage, TARE, quick one, heroine,
removing terror with TUTTARE,
savioress, granting all aims with TURE,
the syllables SVAHA: to you I bow! 

Homage, Tara, quick one, heroine. 
whose eyes flash like lightning, 
born from the opening corolla
of the lotus face of the Lord of the triple world."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer


"OM, homage to the sovereign, the noble, the liberating one.
Homage to TARE, the swift, the courageous one.
In front of you, who with TUTTARA dissipates all fears,
In front of you, who with TURE provides all benefits,
In front of you, SOHA, I bow down.

Homage to the liberating one, swift and courageous,
Whose sight is like instant lightning,
Who arises from myriads of stamens
Of the lotus face of the Protector of the three worlds."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"From the supreme abode of the Potala,
the One born from the green letter TAM,
the light of TAM that rescues all beings,
I request You, Tara, to come with your entourage.
The gods and demigods with their crowns
bow down to your lotus feet and are rescued from all miseries.
I request You Tara, to come with your entourage.
OM! Homage to the venerable Arya Tara!


"The Praise in Twenty-One Homages to Our Lady,
The Goddess Arya-Tara, with its benefits.

Homage!  Tara, swift, heroic!
   With regard like instant lightening!
Sprung from op'ning stamens from the
   Lord of Three Worlds' facial lotus!"
-  Translated by Martin Wilson


"OM Homage to Noble Lady Tara.
Homage to Tara, quick one, heroine.
With TUTTARA, you are the one who banishes all fear.
With TURE, the liberator who bestows all benefits,
With SOHA, I pay homage to you.

Homage, Tara, quick one,
Heroine whose eyes flash like lightning.
Born from the opening corolla of the lotus face
Of the lord of the triple world."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

2

"Homage to you whose face is like
One hundred autumn moons gathered
And blazes with the dazzling light
Of a thousand constellations."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


"All hail!  Your face shines plendid
As a hundred full harvest moons,
Ablaze with your laughing light-rays,
Like the host of a thousand stars!"
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady whose face is filled
with a hundred autumn moons,
blazing with the laughing beams
of the hosts of a thousand stars."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer


"Homage to her whose face gathers
One hundred autumn full moons,
Who blazes with the sparkling light
Of a thousand stars."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage!  She whose face combines a
   hundred autumn moons at fullest!
Blazing with light-rays resplendent
   as a thousand star collection!"
-  Translated by Martin Wilson


"Homage, Mother whose face is filled
With the light of an array of a hundred full autumn moons,
Shining with the brilliant open light
Of the hosts of a thousand stars."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

3

"Homage to you born from a gold-blue lotus
Hands adorned with lotus flowers
Essence of giving, effort and ethics,
Patience, concentration and wisdom."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


"Homage, Lady whose hand is adorned with a lotus,
a lotus blue and gold
whose field of practice is charity, striving,
austerity, calm, acceptance and meditation."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer


"Homage to her whose hand is adorned
With a blue and gold water-born lotus,
Who has for her domain giving, effort,
Asceticism, peace, patience and concentration."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage!  Golden One, blue lotus,
   water-born, in hand adorned!
Giving, Effort, Calm, Austerities,
   Patience, Meditation Her field!"
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, Mother, golden one,
Her hand adorned with a blue lotus,
Whose field of practice is generosity, effort,
Austerity, calm, acceptance, and meditation."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

4


"Homage to you who crown all Buddhas
Whose action subdues without limit
Attained to every perfection
On you the bodhisattvas rely."
-  Translated by the Thubten Chodron 


"All hail - infinity alive,
Triumphal Buddha-brain-dome Queen
Honored by all Victor-children,
Showing all the transcendent virtues."
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady abiding in infinite victory
in the crown knot of the Tathagatha
served by the sons of the Conqueror
who have attained every single perfection."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer


"Homage to the Crown of the Blessed One,
To her who enjoys the infinite and victory,
Who is trusted by the Children of the Conquerors
Who have achieved all perfections."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage!  Crown of Tathagatas
   She who goes in endless triumph!
Honoured much by Conqu'rors' Offspring!
   having reached ev'ry Perfection."
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, Crown of Tathagata
Her actions endlessly victorious,
Venerated by the sons of the conqueror
Who have attained every single perfection."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

5


"Homage to you whose TUTTARA and HUM
Fill the realms of desire, form and space.
You crush seven worlds beneath your feet
And have power to call all forces."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron


"Hail!  You who fill all space of realms
With fierce HUMG and TUTTARA sounds,
You tread upon the seven worlds,
Controlling them all completely."
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady who fills all quarters of space
with the sounds of TUTTARE and HUM,
trampling the seven worlds with her feet
able to summon all before her."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer


"Homage to her who fills the desire, sky, and directions,
With the syllables TUTTARA and HUNG
Who stamps the seven worlds with her feet,
Who possesses the power to summon them."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage! Filling with TUTTARA,
   HUM the regions and space-quarters!
Trampling with Her feet the sev'n worlds,
   able to draw forth all beings!"
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, Mother, filling all regions, sky, and the realm of desire
With the sounds of TUTTARA and HUNG,
Trampling the seven worlds with her feet,
Able to summon all before her."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

6

"Homage to you adored by Indra,
Agni, Brahma, Vayu and Ishvara.
Praised in song by hosts of spirits,
Zombies, scent-eaters and yakshas."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron


"Hail you, adored by the All God,
Indra, Agni, Brahma, Maruts,
Honored by all demons, zombies,
Fairies, angels, and the goblins."
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady worshipped by Indra, Agni, Brahma,
by the Maruts and Vishvesvara,
honored by hosts of spirits,
of ghosts, celestials, and the walking dead."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer


"Homage to her who is honored by Indra, Agni, Brahma,
Vayu and other gods,
Who is praised by spirits, blood drinking spirits, celestial
spirits, and local deities."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage! Worshipped by the All-Lord,
   Sakra, Agni, Brahma, Marut!
Honoured by the hosts of spirits,
   corpse-raisers, gandharvas, yaksas."
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, Mother, worshipped by Indra, Agni, Brahma,
By the Marut and different mighty ones.
Honored by the hosts of spirits, yakshas,
O gandharvas and the walking dead."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

7

"Homage to you whose TREY and PEY
Destroy external wheels of magic.
Right leg drawn in and left extended,
You blaze within a raging fire."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


"Hail, your fierce TRAD and PHAT sounds
Crush enemies' magic diagrams,
Feed planted in the bowman's stance,
Fierce glances blazing searing flames."
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady who destroys the magic devices of others
with the sounds of TRAT and PHAT,
trampling with the right foot up and left extended
blazing with a blazing mass of fire."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer  


"Homage to her who with TRAT and P'AT,
Destroys adverse machinations,
Who, stamping with her foot, right leg folded, left extended,
Blazes with a glowing fire."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage! With Her TRAT and PHAT sounds
   crusher of foes' magic diagrams!
Putting Her feet left out, right back,
   eyes all full of blazing fire."
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, Mother, destroying the magical devices of outsiders
With the sounds of TRET and PHET,
Trampling with her right leg bent and the left extended,
Ablaze with a raging wildfire."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

8

"Homage to you whose TURE destroys
The great fears, the mighty demons.
With a wrathful frown on your lotus face,
You slay all foes without exception."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


"Hail you, O great awesome TURE,
Crusher of satanic champions,
Lotus face so fiercely frowning,
Quickly annihilate all foes!"
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady who annihilates the heroes of Mara,
TURE, the terrible lady,
slaying all enemies
by frowning the brows of her lotus face."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer


"Home to TURE, the very frightful,
Who has complete victory over the demon's warriors,
Who kills all the enemies
By frowning her lotus face."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage! TURE, very dreadful!
   Destroyer of Mara's champion!
She with frowning lotus visage
   who is slayer of all enemies!"
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, TURE, terrible lady,
Who annihilates the warriors of Mara,
Slaying all enemies with a frown
Of wrath on her lotus face."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

9

"Homage to you beautifully adorned
By the Three Jewels' gesture at your heart.
Your wheel shines in all directions
With a whirling mass of light."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron  


Hail you whose heart is beautiful
with hands in the Three-Jew'l gesture,
Their exquisite royal wheel-marks
Shining their light-rays everywhere!
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady holding her hand over her breast
with a gesture that symbolizes the Three Jewels,
her palms adorned with the universal wheel
radiating a turbulent host of its own beams."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer


"Home to her whose fingers in the mudra symbol
Of the Three Jewels adorn the heart,
Who by radiating the rays of her own light,
Adorns the wheel of all directions."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage! She adorned with fingers,
   at Her heart, in Three-Jewel mudra!
Wheel of all quarters adorned,
   filled with masses of Her own light!"
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, Mother, her hand adorns her heart
In a mudra that symbolizes the Three Jewels.
Adorned with the universal wheel
She radiates turbulent light."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

10

"Homage to you, radiant and joyful
Whose crown emits a garland of light.
You, by the laughter of TUTTARA
Conquer demons and lords of the world."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron


"Hail you - garlands of light cascade
From your diadem aglow with joy,
Smiling, laughing with TUTTARE,
You dominate all devil realms."
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady whose diadem spreads a garland
of shining and happy beams,
subjugating Mara and the world
with a laughing, mocking, TUTTARE."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer 


"Home to perfect joy, to her whose sparkling tiara
Spreads garlands of light,
Who with great laughter and TUTTARA
Subjugates demons and their worlds."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage! She of swelling Great Joy,
   diadem emitting garlands!
Mirthful, laughing with TUTTARE,
   subjugating maras, devas!"
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, Joyful Mother, whose brilliant diadem
Spreads out garlands of light,
Subjugating Mara and the world
With a mocking, laughing TUTTARA."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

 

                                     

 

                                   

 

 

 

 

 

11

"Homage to you with power to invoke
The assembly of local protectors.
With your fierce frown and vibrating HUM,
You bring freedom from all poverty."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


"Hail to you who have power to summon
The whole earth's guardian spirit host
You dance, you frown, you sound your HUMG,
Delivers us from disasters."
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady able to summon before her
all the hosts of protectors of the earth,
saving from all distress by the movement
of her frowning brows and the sound of HUM!"
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer 


"Homage to her who has the power to summon
The hosts of the guardians of earth,
Who delivers from all misfortune
With HUNG and moving her frowning forehead."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage! She able to summon
   all earth-guardians and their trains!
Shaking, frowning, with Her HUM-sign
   saving from ev'ry misfortune!"
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, Mother, able to summon before her
All the host of protectors of the earth.
Moving her frowning brows, she saves
From all poverty by the sound of HUNG."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

12

"Homage to you with crescent moon crown
All your adornments dazzling bright.
From your hair-knot, Amitabha
Shines eternal with great beams of light."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


"Hail to you whose diadem shines brightly,
Moon crescent in dark-lock hairdo,
With Amitabha seated in it
Shining polar constant light-rays."
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady whose diadem is a crescent moon
blazing with all its ornaments,
ever lit by the beams
of Amitabha in her piled hair."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer 


"Homage to her whose tiara is a moon crescent,
Ablaze with all adornments,
Who unceasingly spreads the light
From Amitabha sitting in her full hair."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche

 
"Homage! Crowning locks adorned with
   crescent diadem, most shining!
In Her hair-mass, Amitabha
   shining with much light eternal!"
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, Mother, whose diadem
Is a crescent moon, blazing with all her ornaments,
Ever shining with the brilliant light
Of Amitabha in her piled hair."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

13

"Homage to you who dwells in a blazing wreath
Like the fire at the end of this age.
Your right leg outstretched and left drawn in,
Joy surrounds you who defeats hosts of foes."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


"Hail!  You stand wreathed in cosmic flames,
Supernova conflagrations,
In the bowman's stance, joy powered,
Incinerate the wheel of foes."
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady placed amidst a garland that blazes
like the fire at the end of the world era,
annihilating the army of the enemy
in her joyous posture of royal ease."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer 


"Homage to her who dwells amid garlands
Blazing like the fire at the end of time
Whose right leg extended and left folded,
Swirling, gives joy and destroys the horde of enemies."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage!  She 'mid wreath of flames like
   eon-ending fire abiding!
Right leg outstretched, joy-producing,
   destroying the troops of enemies!"
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, Mother, residing amidst the garland that blazes
Like the fire at the end of the world era,
Right leg extended, left bent, encompassed by joy,
Annihilating hosts of enemies."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

14

"Homage to you whose foot stamps the earth
And whose palm strikes the ground by your side.
With a wrathful glance and the letter HUM,
You subdue all in the seven stages."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


"Hail you who sharply clap your hands
And stamp your foot upon the ground,
Frown fiercely, roar the sound of HUMG,
Shatter all seven underworlds."
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady who strikes the earth with her hand,
who pounds upon it with her feet,
shattering the seven underworlds
with the sound of HUM made by her frowning brows.
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer 


"Homage to her who strikes the ground with the palm of her hand
And stamps it with her foot,
Who frowning her eyebrows, with the syllable HUNG
Shatters the seven underground levels."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage! She who smites the ground with
   Her palm, and with Her foot beats it!
Frowning, with the letter HUM the
   seven underworlds She shatters."
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, Mother, who hits the earth with the palm of her hand,
Who pounds on it with her feet,
Frowning wrathfully, she shatters
The seven underworlds by the sound of HUNG."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

15

"Homage to the blissful, virtuous, peaceful one
Object of practice, nirvana's peace
Perfectly endowed with SOHA and OM
Overcoming all the great evils."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


"Hail you, blissful, gentle, beauty,
Luxurious peaceful in Nirvana,
Glorious with SVAHA and with OM,
Destroy all great atrocities!"
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady blissful, virtuous, calm
whose field of practice is calm nirvana,
possessed of SVAHA and OM,
destroying great sins."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer  


"Homage to her who is happiness, virtue and peace
who lives in peace beyond suffering,
Who conquers the greatly harmful deeds
With the purity of SOHA and OM."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage! Happy, Virtuous, Peaceful!
   She whose field is Peace, Nirvana!
She endowed with OM and SVAHA!
   Of the great downfall destroyer!"
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, Mother, blissful, virtuous, calm,
Whose field of activity is peaceful nirvana,
Endowed with the true perfection of SOHA and OM,
Destroying great evils."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

16

"Homage to you with joyous retinue
You subdue fully all enemies' forms
The ten-letter mantra adorns your heart
And your knowledge-HUM brings liberation."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


"Hail you whose power is total joy,
Who rend the bodies of all foes
With your magic syllables ten―
OM TARE TUTTARE TURE SVAHA
And your ferocious spell of HUMG!
OM NAMAS TARE NAMO HARE HUMG HARE SVAHA."
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady who shatters the bodies of enemies,
in her joyous posture,
the savioress manifested from HUM,
in the mantra arraying the sound of ten syllables."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer  


"Homage to her who completely delights her entourage
Who destroys the bodies of enemies,
to the liberating one coming from the mantric HUNG
Who emits the utterance of the ten syllables."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche   


"Homage! She bound round with joy, and
   tearing foes' bodies asunder!
Luminous with the HUM-mantra,
  word-array of the ten syllables!"
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, Mother, encompassed by joy,
Who shatters the bodies of enemies,
Savioress manifesting from the rigpa of HUNG,
Arraying the sounds of the ten-syllable mantra."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

17

"Homage to TURE with stamping feet
Whose essence is the seed-letter HUM
You cause Merus, Mandara and Vindaya
And all three worlds to tremble and shake."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


Hail you, Swift Lady, stamp your foot,
Spring forth from your HUMG-shaped seed,
You shake the whole threefold planet,
Mounts Meru, Kailash, Mandara!
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady who strikes with the feet of TURE
whose seed is in the form of the syllable HUM,
shaking Mount Meru, Mandara, Kailasha,
and all the triple world."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer  


"Homage to TURE who stamps with her foot,
To whom HUNG is the seed syllable,
Who shakes Mount Meru, Mandara,
Kalish, and the three worlds."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage!  Swift One!  The foot stamper
   with for seed the letter HUM's shape!
She who shakes the triple world and
   Meru, Mandra and Kailas!
-  Translated by Martin Wilson 


"Homage, TURE, stamping her feet,
Whose seed appears in the form of HUNG,
Shaking Mount Meru, Mandara, Binduchal,
and the triple world."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

 

 

18

"Homage to you who holds in your hand
A moon like a celestial lake
Saying TARA twice and the letter PEY
You dispel all poisons without exception."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


Hail you who holds the hare-marked moon
Like a divine lake in your hand,
Totally extracts all poisons
Pronouncing TARA TARA PHAT."
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady holding the deer-marked moon
in the form of an ocean of gods,
dispelling all poison
with the sound of P'HAT and twice-spoken TARA."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer  


"Homage to her who holds in her hand the hare-marked moon
In the form of the gods' lake
Who totally dispels poison
By reciting twice TARA and P'AT."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage! She in whose hand rests the
   deer-marked moon, of deva-lake form!
With twice-spoken TARA and PHAT
   totally dispelling poison."
-  Translated by Martin Wilson   


"Homage, Mother holding the rabbit-marked moon,
Which is like a heavenly lake,
Dispelling all poison with the sound of PHET
and the twice-spoken TARA."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

19

"Homage to you on whom the kings of gods,
The gods themselves and all spirits rely.
Your armor radiates joy to all
You soothe conflicts and nightmares as well."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


Hail you― honored by the God Indra,
Brahma, all gods and horse-head fairies,
With armor of joy estatic,
You stop all conflict and bad dreams."
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady served by the ruler of hosts of gods,
by the gods and horse-headed celestials,
dispelling contention and bad dreams
with the brilliance of her joyous armor."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer  


"Homage to her who is honored by hosts of gods, kings,
Gods, and horse-headed beings,
Who dispels conflicts and bad dreams
With her armor of resplendent joy."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage! She whom god-host rulers,
   gods and kinnaras do honour!
Joy-producing one, Her fullness
   conflict and bad dreams dispelling."
-  Translated by Martin Wilson   


"Homage, Mother served by the ruler of the hosts of gods,
By the gods and kinnaras,
Dispelling conflicts and bad dreams
With her armor of joy and splendor."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

20

"Homage to you whose eyes, the sun and moon,
Radiate with pure brilliant light
Uttering HARA twice and TUTTARA
Dispels extremely fearful plagues."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


"Hail you, your shining sun-moon eyes
Penetrate like lightning flashes,
HARA HARA TUTTARA,
You allay all fatal fevers!"
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


"Homage, Lady in whose eyes is the brilliant light
of the sun and the full moon,
dispelling terrible fevers,
with TUTTARE and twice-spoken HARA."
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer  


"Homage to her whose eyes shine
With the radiance of the sun and moon
Who dispels virulent epidemics
With two HARA and with TUTTARA."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage! She whose eyes are bright with
   radiance of sun or full moon!
With twice HARA and TUTTARE
   Driver-out of chronic fever."
-  Translated by Martin Wilson   


"Homage, Mother, whose two eyes
Are the sun and full moon, shining with brilliant light,
Who dispels deadly disease
With TUTTARA and twice-spoken HARA."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

21

"Homage to you, adorned with three natures
Perfectly endowed with peaceful strength
You destroy demons, zombies and yakshas
O TURE, most exalted and sublime!

Thus the root mantra is praised
And twenty-one homages offered."
-  Translated by Thubten Chodron 


"Hail, three reality created,
Flowing bliss-power Shiva-Shakti,
Best Swift Lady, you overcome
Rushing demons, zombies, ogres!

This mantra-rooted hymn of praise,
Twenty-one-fold salutation,
Sing it ardent, true, and thoughtful,
With devotion to the Goddess! 

Remember it well at evening,
Or at dawn upon arising,
It gives safety, stops every sin,
Reverses all evil fortunes.

One will soon be well anointed
By seventy million victors,
Enjoying thereby much glory,
At last achieving Buddhahood! 

Remembering it, one is released
From effects of vilest poisons,
Animal, plant or mineral,
Whether taken in food or drink!

Reciting it three sevens twice
Completely stops the suffering
Of addictions, demons, fevers,
Poisons, even in other beings;
Who wants a child will soon get one,
Who wants wealth will soon receive it.
One will fulfill all one's wishes
And will not suffer any harm."
-  Translated by Robert Thurman


 

"Homage, Lady endowed with the strength of calm
by the array of the three truths, OM AH HUM,
destroying the hosts of evil spirits, the walking dead,
TURE, most excellent lady!

This is the praise with the basic mantra,
and these are the twenty-one homages.

Reverently recited by an intelligent man,
by one who has great devotion to the goddess,
arising at evening or at dawn to remember them,
they grant complete fearlessness,
they pacify all sins,
they destroy all evil destinies.
Quickly will he be initiated
by 70 million Buddhas;
attained the greatness thereof,
he will proceed to the rank of Buddhahood. "
-  Translated by Stephan Beyer  


"Homage to her who through the three established principles
Fully possesses the power of pacifying
to TURE, the sublime, victor
Of the spirits, blood drinking spirits, and local deities.

Such are the praise of the root mantra
and the twenty-one homage."
-  Translated by Bokar Rinpoche


"Homage! Full of liberating
   power by set of three Realities!
Crushing crowds of spirits, yaksas
   and corpse-raisers!  Supreme!  TURE!"

This praise, rooted in mantras, a
   twenty-one-fold homage - for one
Who recites it, wise and pious,
   full of faith towards the Goddess,
And remembers it at evening
   or at dawn on rising, it grants
Ev'ry fearlessness, quells all sins,
  and destroys all bad migrations.
Quickly he'll be consecrated
   by sev'n times ten million Conqu'rors.
Granting greatness herein, he will
   reach at last the rank of Buddha. 
-  Translated by Martin Wilson   


"Homage, Mother, endowed with the power to pacify
By the array of the three natural states,
Destroying the hosts of evil spirits, yakshas, and the walking dead,
TURE most excellent Mother.

This is the praise with the root mantra,
And these are the twenty-one homages. 
Reverently recited by whoever has intelligence
And genuine devotion to the goddess,
Arising at dawn or evening to remember it,
It grants complete fearlessness.
All evil deeds are pacified;
All evil destinies are destroyed. 
Quickly, one will be initiated
By the seventy million buddhas.
Attaining greatness by this practice,
One will proceed to the ultimate state, buddhahood."
-  Translated by Anna Orlova

 

 

White Tara

 

 

 

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Praises for the Twenty One Taras
Bibliography, Links, Resources

 

Beyer 1978   The Cult of Tara: Magic and Ritual in Tibet  By Stephan Beyer.  Berkeley, University of California Press, 1978.  Index, bibliography, notes, 542 pages.  ISBN: 9780520036352.  VSCL.  The Praises to the Twenty One Taras is found on pages 211-214.  Online Version.


Bokar 1999   Tara: The Feminine Divine  By Bokar Rinpoche.  San Francisco, California, Clear Point Press, 1999.  Index, glossary, 176 pages.  The Praises and a detailed commentary are found on pp. 83-122.  ISBN: 9781930164000.  VSCL.   


Chodron 1988   Pearl Of Wisdom Book 2: Buddhist Prayers and Practices  Compiled and translated by the Venerable Bhikshuni Thubten Chodron (1950-).  Sravasti Abbey, 5th Edition, 1988.  83 pages.  ISBN: 0985849819.  Online Version.  


Chodron 2005   How to Free Your Mind: Tara the Liberator.  By the Venerable Bhikshuni Thubten Chodron.  Ithaca, New York, Snow Lion Publications, 2005.  Glossary, bibliography, 224 pages.  ISBN: 1559392266.  The Homage to the Twenty-One Taras are found on pages 60-63.  The books includes a commentary on the Homage, pp. 65-106.  VSCL. 


Karthar 2009   The Wish-Fulfilling Wheel: The Practice of White Tara  By Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche.  Compiled and edited by Karma Sonam Drolma.  Kingston, New York, Rinchen Publications, 2009.  196 pages.  ISBN: 0971455422.  VSCL.  Although this book does not include a translation of the 21 Praises, it is an outstanding record of an initiation to the White Tara Sadhana. 


Shaw 2006   Buddhist Goddesses of India  By Miranda Shaw.  Princeton, New Jersey, Princeton University Press, 2006.  Bibliography, notes, index, 571 pages.  ISBN:  0691127581.  VSCL. 


Sherab 2007   Tara's Enlightened Activity: Commentary on The Praises to the Twenty-One Taras.  By Khenchen Palden Sherab and Khenpo Tsewang Dongyal.   The translation of the "Twenty-one Praises of Tara" (pp. 51-174) is by Anna Orlova.  The commentary on each Praise (pp. 51-174) includes word (outer) meanings, general (inner) meanings, hidden (secret) meaning and ultimate (very secret) meaning.  Snow Lion Publications, 2007.  242 pages.  ISBN: 1559392878.  VSCL. 


Thurman 1995   Essential Tibetan Buddhism.  By Robert A. F. Thurman.  Edison, New Jersey, Castle Books, 1995.  Notes, 317 pages.  ISBN: 0785808728.  The Twenty-one Praises are found on pp. 266-269.  VSCL. 


Wilson 1992   In Praise of Tara: Songs to the Saviouress.  By Martin Wilson.  Wisdom Publications, 1992.  496 pages.  ISBN: 0861711092.  VSCL.  Martin Wilson provides a translation into English of "The Praise of Twenty-One Homages to Our Lady, the Goddess Arya-Tara" (pp. 113-115) based on a translation from the Sanskrit version found in the Tibetan Buddhist Scriptures Compendium (Kangyur) produced around 1210 CE.  Commentary on the Praises, including artwork, on pp. 117-166. 


VSCL =  Valley Spirit Center Library, Red Bluff, California

 

 

                                               

 

 

 

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Praises for the Twenty One Taras
Notes and Commentary
By Michael Garofalo

 

My commentary will appear in 2013. 

 

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Tara Prayers

Tara, Green Tara, White Tara, Liberator, Savioress, Star Goddess, Protector, Bodhisvatta, Maha Devi
Buddhist Goddess in Tibet and India
Linked to: Devi Tara, Kali, Mahavidyas,
Mahadevi, Parvati, Kuan Yin, Paranasabari, Neel Saraswati

 

"Mother of enlightened activity who creates all the enlightened ones,
By the power of supplicating to you through approaching, practice and devotion, bless me always
    to practice with devotion to you.
So that I and all sentient being may complete the two accumulations of merit and wisdom.
Then, may the four activities be accomplished and extraordinary and common siddhis be granted.
May pure vision of the deities and the mantra rise from the dharmadhatu,
And may we take enlightened activity as our path and stir the depths of samsara.
In the realm of the great dharmakaya, all appearances and existence are non-dual,
The two aspects of enlightened form appear according to the capacities of sentient beings,
May it always being benefit and well-being through the countless acts of perfect merit!
I take refuge until I am enlightened
In the buddhas, the dharma, and the sangha.
Through the merit I create by practicing giving and the other perfections,
May I attain buddhahood for the sake of all sentient beings. 
May all sentient beings have happiness and the causes of happiness;
May all sentient beings be free from suffering and the causes of suffering;
May all sentient beings never be separated from the happiness that knows no suffering;
May all sentient beings live in equanimity, free from attachment and aversion."
Green Tara: Two Meditation Practices

 

Praises of the Twenty One Taras

 

 

Tara's Mantra

 

Om Tare Tuttare Ture SoHa

"Om Tah Ray Too Tah Ray Too Ray Svā Ha"       (Suggested English Pronunciation)


The meanings of this mantra are suggested as: 

"One who saves, save me.”


Om
=  The most sacred sound (Aum, Om, Ohm, Hum) for the Divine discussed in the Upanishads 
          OM is the body, speech, and mind of the Buddha.


Tare
= The One who liberates us from suffering,
          The One who frees us from suffering
          Tare is Dharma, the true path away from suffering, the wise words 
          Protection from mundane worldly dangers. 
          The Savioress from physical dangers, fears, and worries. 
          You are the mother, TARE, who liberates us from samsara and absolute dangers 


Tuttare
=  The One who liberates us from the eight fears,
               The One that liberates beings from danger
               The One who can vanquish the eight terrors
               The One who can protect and lead us on the right spiritual path.
               The Savioress from delusion, negative emotions, doubt, greediness. 
               She who ferries us across to safety. 
               You free us from the eight dangers, fears, harms, relative dangers 


Ture
= The One who liberates us from illness
           The One who that releases beings from sickness
           The One who can make us healthy and end our illnesses
           You protect us from all illnesses

 

Svāha or So Ha = Laying the Foundation, So Be It, Make it So
                          Svaha, according to "Monier-William’s Sanskrit Dictionary,"
                          means: "Hail!", "Hail to!" or "May a blessing rest on!"
                          May this come about
                          May blessings be upon 

 


"Ture
represents the culmination of the spiritual path in terms of deliverance into the altruistic path of universal salvation – the Bodhisattva path. In the Bodhisattva path we aspire for personal enlightenment, but we also connect compassionately with the sufferings of others, and strive to liberate them at the same time as we seek enlightenment ourselves. Tara therefore delivers us from a narrow conception of the spiritual life. She saves us from the notion that spiritual progress is about narrowly liberating ourselves from our own suffering, and instead leads us to see that true spiritual progress involves having compassion for others."
Green Tara Mantra


"The first syllable OM invokes auspiciousness, peace and balance.  OM is also connected to the body of the buddhas.  It grounds us in the practice.  TARE, just like
Drölma, Tara's Tibetan name, refers to her as the swift and heroic liberator.  When you're a hero, you love what you're doing.  So Tara is enthusiastic!  TARE liberates us from fears and troubles; more profoundly, she liberates us from samsara.  TUTTARE reflects her powerful activity of fulfilling all wishes; more profoundly, she brings us to nirvana.  With TURE, we move beyond both samsara and nirvana to the ultimate nondual state of the dharmakaya.  Finally, SOHA establishes us in the state of complete elightenment, "firmly driven like a stake." "
-  Sherab 2007   Tara's Enlightened Activity: Commentary on The Praises to the Twenty-One Taras, p.44
 


 

 

Om Tāre Tuttāre Ture Svāhā / Om Tare Tuttare Ture Svaha

 

 

"Worship of Tārā can involve the use of prayer, chants, mantras, and visualizations, depending on the level of the practitioner. Two ways of approaching Tārā are common. First, lay practitioners directly appeal to her protective nature by invoking her mantra. Tārā’s mantra is widely known as, Om Tare Tuttare Ture Svaha (meaning “One who saves, save me”). The mantra is said to ward off fears or dangers, especially those outlined in the eight terrors. There are countless stories of people who were beset by danger and certain death, but gained Tārā’s protection and were saved after crying out her name or reciting her mantra. One must thoroughly contemplate a mantra to be able to apply it successfully; often this requires extensive ritual service to the deity. Merit must be accumulated, and recitations of a mantra may be recommended in the tens or hundreds of thousands. All faults or interruptions in recitation must be made up for by further recitations. Faults are characterized by reciting improperly, too slowly, too quickly, too softly, or in an incoherent manner. Interruptions may include coughing, sneezing, falling asleep, stumbling, or allowing the mind to wander. Indications that one’s mind has been adequately prepared through this ritual service to the deity come in the form of twelve signs. These signs include feeling little hunger or thirst, feeling free of fatigue, feeling free of illness, and feeling pleasant warmth as one’s body begins to glow. Also, one’s understanding grows, comprehension of scripture progresses, and dreams are promising and come true. One feels no reluctance towards reciting the mantra and is instead inclined towards doing so. Finally, not only does one willingly strive toward preserving such qualities, but one’s devotion to the patron deity becomes great (Beyer, 244). Magical powers may also indicate contemplative mastery, signaling attainment of great merit. These magical attainments may include invisibility, invincibility, youth, levitation, instant self transportation, and domination over all other things, as well as many other godly powers (Beyer, 246). The speaking of such a mantra is so central and important in practice that it holds tangible power itself, detached from and beyond the deity (Beyer, 242). Beyond its spoken use, Tārā’s mantra may also be carved into a substance to ensure continual protection."
Tara - The New World Encyclopedia

 

Read the excellent suggestions for a Tara Puja by Drea Bradley.  

Songs of Tara  Devotional Music to the Goddess of Liberation.  Sounds True, 2011.  Audio CD.   VSCL.  Includes many chants of Tara's mantra. 

Tara's Mantra Meaning   From Lama Palden Drolma's Website. 

 

Om Tare Tuttare Ture Mama Ayuh Punya Jnana Pustim Kuru Svaha

 

 

OM HRIM STRIM HUM PHAT! OM

"OM HRIM STRIM HUM PHAT! OM is the mantra of deliverance (Taraka Mantra). This is a popular mantra for the Hindu Goddess Tara Devi.  HRIM is a mantra of purification and transformation. STRIM is the feminine nature (stri) and gives the power to give birth and sustenance. HUM is the mantra of divine wrath and protection, as well as knowledge and perceptive power. PHAT also gives protection and destroys obstacles."
-  Vamadeva Shastri-David Frawley. "Tantric Yoga and the Wisdom Goddesses. 
   "Tantric Mantra of the Goddess Tara, UTube Video, 9:20 minutes. 

 

 


OM ĀH HŪM


"On the top of her head is a white OM; on her throat is a red ĀH; on her heart, above the circle of a moon, is a white syllable TĀM  marked with a blue HŪM."
-  Stephan Beyer, The Cult of Tara, p. 379  [Visualization for the White Tara, Cintacākra]

"Though Tara appears, she is empty and luminous, like a rainbow.  Inside the empty, hollow enclosure of her body, in the center of her forehead is a luminous white syllable OM.  At her throat is a read syllable AH, and a little below her heart center is a blue syllable HUNG.  In the Buddhist teachings, it is said that OM is the essence of the form of all enlightened beings.  AH is the essence of speech of all enlightened beings.  HUNG is the essence of the mind of all enlightened beings.  In the midst of your body, at the level of your heart you visualize a white lotus, and on top of that a moon, a disk of white light.  Standing upright on top of this is a white syllable TAM."
-  Khenpo Karthar Rionpoche, The Wish Fulfilling Wheel, p. 48.    

My spiritual practice, using this mantra, involves the following:  Sit, be quiet, settle the mind.  Smile and soften the heart.  Hold both hands, gently closed, touching at the knuckles, comfortably at around waist level.  Look down at the hands.  Close the eyes. 
1)  Raise the head, inhale and tighten the abdominal and perineal muscles (mula banda) and focus on the root charkra
(Muladhara).  Breathe in slowly through the nose with the tongue gently held at the roof of the mouth.  Pause!: Don't breathe, relax, sink into emptiness.  Open the eyes wide and begin to slowly exhale through the nose, relax the entire body.  Make the Flying Bird Mudra (thumb and ring finger touching, all other fingers extended).  Look at your hands.  Make the sound "OM" as you completely and slowly exhale.  I associate OM with the head, white light, wisdom, Mind, Tara, Buddha, emptiness, and insight.  After exhaling completely, close the eyes, close the hands, settle, and relax.  Pause! 
2)  Raise the head, inhale slowly through the nose and do mula banda.  Pause!  Open the eyes wide, and look at the Flying Bird mudra.  Make the sound "ĀH" as you exhale.  I associate ĀH with the throat, red, right speech, teaching, truth, Dharma, and Tara's worship.  After exhaling completely, close the eyes, close the hands, settle, and relax.  Pause! 
3)  Raise the head, inhale slowly through the nose and do mula banda.  Pause!  Open the eyes wide, and look at the Flying Bird mudra.  Make the sound "HŪM" as you exhale. I associate HŪM with the heart, blue, kindness (metta), compassion, sharing, friendships, serving, and the Sangha. 
4.  Repeat in sets of three. 
 

"These visualized tormas are then empowered by reciting OM ĀH HŪM three times, each recitation accompanied by rolling the fingers inward and bringing the hands around to form the special empowering flying-fird gesture so named after its spreading wing-like shape.  Thus pure and empowered, the tormas are given to the blessed noble lady [Arya Tara, Cintacakra] the gathering into one of the Three Jewels, and to her retinue..." 
Stephen Beyer, The Cult of Tara, p. 218. 

 

 

 

"OM JETSÜM MA PHAG MA DRÖL MA LA CHAG TSHAL LO

CHAG TSHAL TA RE NYUR MA PA MO

TU TA RA YI JIG PA SEL MA

TU RE DÖN KÜN JIN PE DRÖL MA

SO HE YI GE CHÖ LA DÜ DO

 

"Homage to Noble Lady Tara
Homage to Tara, quick one, heroine
With TUTTARA, who are the one who banihes all fear.
With TURE, the liberator who bestows all benefits.
With SOHA, I pay homage to you."
-  Khenchen Palden Sherab, Tara's Enlightened Activity, p.53 

 

"If we cannot recite the long "Homage to the Twenty-one Taras," reciting the condensed praise is fine.  This praises the mantra― that is, it praises her realizations.  The short verse, translated by the Venerable Sangye Khadro, is:

OM to the transcendent subduer, Arya Tara, I prostrate.
Homage to the glorious one who frees with TARE;
With TUTTARA you calm all fears;
You bestow all success with TURE;
To the sound SOHA I pay great homage."
-  The Venerable Thubten Chodron, How to Free Your Mind: Tara the Liberator, p. 95

 

"OM, homage to the sovereign, the noble, the liberating one
Homage to TARE, the swift, the courageous one.
In front of you, who with TUTTARA dissipates all fears,
In front of you, who with TURE provides all benefits,
In front of you, SOHA, I bow down."
-  Bokar Rinpoche, Tara: The Feminine Divine, p. 85 

 

 

 

JETSUNMA PAKMA DROLMA

Jetsunma = Venerable Lady

Je = supremacy, ultimate
tsun = noble, without defect, perfect
ma = lady, woman, mother, Mother

Pakma (Tibetan) = Arya (Sanskrit) = elevated, exhalted, high, worthy

Drolma (Tibetan) = Tara (Sanskrit) =  Liberator, She Who liberates

 

 

 

OM SHUNYATA JNANA BEDZRA SOBHAWA EMAKO HAM

"All things and I are the embodiment of that indestructible wisdom that is emptiness."

"Nairãtmyã (Dagmema), translated as "Lady of Emptiness" or "She Who Has Realized Selflessness." is a female BuddhaBuddhism teaches that to perceive ourselves as independent, separate selves, is an illusion. For in truth we are connected with all that exists in a vast web of communion (without self). Nairatmya embodies this realization (also called pudgala- nairatmya, the not-permanent-selfness of persons). Her body is blue, the color of infinite space, reflecting the limitless expanse of her awareness. Like the element of space, she flows through the universe without impediment, for she has transcended ego-centered existence. Her eyes blaze with the wisdom of one who understands the mysteries and depths of life. She raises her curved knife (kartika) skyward, poised to sever negative mindstates wherever they arise. In her skullcup (kapala), she pulverizes illusions and returns them to their original state - a mere play of light, a rainbow of energy, shimmering in empty space."
Nairatmya  

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Iconography of Tara

 

Paintings and statues of the Goddess Tara usually include:

1.  The Goddess Arya Tara (Green Tara or White Tara) holds the long stem of a lotus flower.  The lotus flower (Padma) has been used since ancient times as a key symbol in Hinduism and Buddhism and other religions.  The lotus is most often held in the left hand of Arya Tara.  Her left hand is held near her heart.  The huge bloom of the lotus typically appears above her left shoulder.  Tara is often seated on a lotus.  She typically holds the stem of the lotus flower between her left thumb and left ring finger, and the other three fingers are gently held open.  This particular ritual hand position or symbolic hand gesture (mudra) is referred to as the Prithivi Mudra which recharges the root chakra (Muladhara) aligning it with earth energies (Gertrud Hirschi, Mudras, p.84).  "Her left hand is in the gesture of the Three Jewels, with the thumb and ring finger touching and the other three fingers stretched upward.  These three fingers represent the Three Jewels [Buddha, Dharma, Sanga].  They indicate that by entrusting ourselves to these three objects of refuge and practicing their teachings, we can actualize the unity of compassion, bliss, and wisdom, which is symbolized by the joining of her ring finger and thumb." (Chodron 2005, p. 21)  See the reference to this mudra in the Praises #9.  The Hindu Goddess Lakshmi also holds a lotus flower or is standing on a lotus. 

Postcards and Artwork of Tibetan Buddhist Deities  Great for altars 

 

 

 

Red Tara


 

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Initiations or Empowerment for the Worship of Tara

 

"An empowerment is a ritual in Tibetan Buddhism which initiates a student into a particular tantric deity practice. The Tibetan word for this is wang (Skt. abhiṣeka; Tib. དབང་, wang; Wyl. dbang), which literally translates to power. The Sanskrit term for this is abhiseka which literally translates to sprinkling or bathing or anointing. A tantric practice is not considered effective or as effective until a qualified master has transmitted the corresponding power of the practice directly to the student. This may also refer to introducing the student to the mandala of the deity.  An individual is not allowed to engage in a deity practice without the empowerment for that practice. The details of an empowerment ritual are often kept secret as are the specific rituals involved in the deity practice.  By receiving the empowerment, the student enters into a samaya connection with the teacher.  At the level of the anuttarayoga tantra class of practices; the samayas traditionally entail fourteen points of observance. The vajra master may also include particular directives, such as specifying that the student complete a certain amount of practice.  The ritual for performing an empowerment can be divided into four parts:  1) 'vase' (Sanskrit: bumpa) or water empowerment; 2) secret or crown empowerment; 3) knowledge-wisdom (prajna-jnana) or vajra empowerment; and 4) word or 'bell' (Sanskrit: ghanta) empowerment."
Empowerment (Tibetan Buddhism) 

 

"And the axiom of acquisition is this: a power must always be received first from some holy person who possesses it.  Thus the primary transmission of power is inevitably a magical operation performed upon the recipient by his Master; the power of contemplation is acquired first through another and then through oneself as the deity, for the initiation must empower the young contemplative as a fit vessel for the divinity he achieves in the ritual service. "The initiation is the basis of the magical attainments," says Tsongk'apa.  "If one does not have it, then however much one may persevere upon the path it is impossible to gain the special magical attainments." (p.363) ...  "The primary signification of "initiation" in Tibet is as a guarantor of lineage - of authenticity of doctrinal transmission - and as a preliminary and proper authorization to practice; only secondarily is it considered as a means in itself to genuine realization." (p.399)
-  Stephan Beyer, The Cult of Tara.  A detailed description of a White Tara initiation ceremony is found on pp. 363-399. 

 

"Most tantrayana or vajrarana visualization and mantra practices require that an initiation and subsequent authorization and instruction be given by a qualified lama before the sadhana, or ritual practice, can begin. However, a few practices, those that were given publicly by Lord Buddha Shakyamuni, do not fall under such restrictions. Very definitely, all the practices given in the Sutras have the full blessing of the Buddha and therefore can be practiced if one has the aspiration to do so. Such practices include those of the noble Chenrezig and of the mother of the buddhas, Green Tara.  Naturally, whenever it is possible for you to take the vajrayana initiation of  Chenrezig or Green Tara, you are encouraged to do so.  Right now, however, the practice in which I am giving you instruction can be practiced straight away, due wholly to the blessing of Buddha Shakyamuni. When you finally do get around to receiving the Chenrezig initiation, it will deepen your practice and strengthen your connection with your tsaway lama and with Yidam Chenrezig." 
Initiation, Empowerment or Wangkur

 

Initiation, Empowerment or Wangkur 

White Tara Empowerment by the H.H. Dalai Lama DVD

Tibetan Buddhist Empowerment Ceremonies in Northern California

Tara Empowerment Ceremonies in Northern California

Green Tara Empowerment Ceremonies in Northern California

Tibetan Buddhist Initiation in Northern California

The Wish-Fulfilling Wheel: The Practice of White Tara  By Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche.  Compiled and edited by Karma Sonam Drolma.  Kingston, New York, Rinchen Publications, 2009.  196 pages.  ISBN: 0971455422.  VSCL.  This book is an outstanding record of an initiation to the White Tara Sadhana. 

 

 

                                     

 

                                   

 

 

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Altar for Tara

 

My indoor home altar

Gushen Grove: Our outdoor home ritual space (nemeton), sacred circle, and altar in Red Bluff, California.

Personally, I make use of 1) the worship structure outlined in Venerable Thubten Chodron's excellent guide to daily practice found in Guided Meditations on the Stages of the Path where the focus and visualize is mostly on Arya Tara as the Buddha, Bodhisattva, and Goddess; and, 2) the excellent instructions by Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche in The Wish-Fulfilling Wheel: The Practice of White Tara

More information coming later. 

 

 

Dharma Treasures


Portala Gate


Tibetan Treasures
 

Tibetan Buddhist Ritual Vases - Images from Google


Tibetan Buddhist Green Tara Mandala - Images from Google 


Postcards and Artwork of Tibetan Buddhist Deities  Great for altars 


Tibetan Spirit: Buddhist Art and Ritual Items 


Namse Bangdzo Bookstore 

 

 

Green Goddess Tara

 

 

 

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Related, Associated With, or Goddesses Comparable to Tara:

 

Avalokiteshvara   Sanskrit   Bodhisattva  "Avalokiteśvara (Sanskrit: अवलोकितेश्वर lit. "Lord who looks down") is a bodhisattva who embodies the compassion of all Buddhas. Portrayed in different cultures as either male or female, Avalokiteśvara is one of the more widely revered bodhisattvas in mainstream Mahayana Buddhism, as well as unofficially in Theravada Buddhism.  The Chinese name for Avalokiteśvara is Guānshìyīn Púsà (觀世音菩薩), which is a translation of the earlier name "Avalokitasvara Bodhisattva." This bodhisattva is variably depicted as male or female, and may also be referred to simply as Guānyīn.  In Sanskrit, Avalokitesvara is also referred to as Padmapāni ("Holder of the Lotus") or Lokeśvara ("Lord of the World"). In Tibetan, Avalokiteśvara is known as Jainraisig, སྤྱན་རས་གཟིགས་ (Wylie: spyan ras gzigs) and is said to be incarnated in the Dalai Lama, the Karmapa and other high lamas."

Bodhisattva    "In Buddhism, a bodhisattva (Sanskrit: बोधिसत्त्व bodhisattva; Pali: बोधिसत्त bodhisatta) is either an enlightened (bodhi) existence (sattva) or an enlightenment-being or, given the variant Sanskrit spelling satva rather than sattva, "heroic-minded one (satva) for enlightenment (bodhi)."  The Pali term has sometimes been translated as "wisdom-being," although in modern publications, and especially in tantric works, this is more commonly reserved for the term jñānasattva ("awareness-being"; Tib. ཡེ་ཤེས་སེམས་དཔའ་་, Wyl. ye shes sems dpa’). Traditionally, a bodhisattva is anyone who, motivated by great compassion, has generated bodhicitta, which is a spontaneous wish to attain Buddhahood for the benefit of all sentient beings."

Chenresig   Tibetan   Bodhisattva

Devi Tara

Kali 

Kuan Yin  Chinese Bodhisattva

Lakshmi

Mahadevi

Mahavidyas

Nairatmya

Parvati

Paranasabari

Neel Saraswati 

Tara Devi    Hindu Goddess in India  "In Hinduism, the goddess Tara (Bengali:দেবী তারা মা )(Sanskrit: Tārā, Devanagari: तारा) meaning "star" is the second of the Dasa (ten) Mahavidyas or "Great Wisdom [goddesses]", Tantric manifestations of Mahadevi, Kali, or Parvati. As the star is seen as a beautiful but perpetually self-combusting thing, so Tara is perceived at core as the absolute, unquenchable hunger that propels all life.  The similarities in appearances between Kali and Tara are striking and unmistakable. They both are described as standing upon a supine Shiva in inert or corpse like form. However, while Kali is described as black, Tara is described as blue. Both wear minimal clothing, however Tara wears a tiger skin skirt, while Kali wears only a girdle of severed human arms. Both wear a necklace of severed human heads and the previously mentioned girdle of arms. Both have a lolling tongue, and blood oozes from their mouths. Their appearances are so strikingly similar that it is easy to mistake one for the other. Indeed, they are often said to be manifestations of each other; for example, in their thousand-name hymns they share many epithets as well as having each others names. Tara, for example, is called Kalika, Ugra-kali, Mahakali, and Bhadra-kali. Tara is said to be more approachable to the devotee (Bhakta) or Tantrika because of her maternal instincts; however a large population of Bengali Hindus approach Kali herself as "Ma" or "mother"."  Some researchers believe Paranasabari is another name for Hindu Goddess Tara, and Tara is the only female goddess not only worshiped in India but also Mongolia and Tsarist Russia.  Again in Buddhist religion incidentally, Paranasabari is depicted as attendant of Buddhist deity of same name, Tara.

Vajrayogini 

Yeshe Tsogyal   Tibetan   Mother of Knowledge 

 

 

Vajrayogini Tara Red
Vajrayogini Tara Devi
   
        

Kali

Tara Devi

      

 

Chenresig

 

 

 

 

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Valley Spirit Yoga
Yoga Practice, Education, and Research

 

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Michael P. Garofalo, All Rights Reserved

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