Dhammapada Sutta

Sayings of The Buddha from the Pali Tipitaka (Three Baskets) Canon, Circa 100 BCE
Siddhārtha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BCE)


Chapters 17-20
Verses 221-289


Compiled by

Michael P. Garofalo
September 12, 2009
  

Introduction     Bibliography     Links     Resources     Chapter Topics (1-26)     Notes     General Subject Index

Chapter 17     Chapter 18     Chapter 19     Chapter 20

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The Buddha Teaching

 

 

 

 

 

Dhammapada Sutta

Chapter XVII
Guarding One's Character,  Daily Efforts, Controlling Emotions, Anger, Kodhavagga       

Dharmapada Sutra, Chapter 17, Verses 221-234  

 

 
Verse 221     (17:221)     
221.  Put away anger, eschew self-will, conquer every bond.  No suffering touches him who does not cling to phenomenal existence, but calls nothing his own.   
Wagiswara 1912  
221.  Let a man leave anger, let him forsake pride, let him overcome all bondage!  No sufferings befall the man who is not attached to name 
and form, and who calls nothing his own.   Muller 1881   

221.  One should give up anger.  One should abandon pride.  One should overcome all fetters.  Sorrow cannot touch one who does not cling to mind
and body, and is thus passionless.   Narada 1959   

 

 

Verse 222     (17:222)     

222.  Whoever controls his rising anger just as a charioteer controls his chariot at full speed is called a true charioteer; others merely hold the reins.   Narada 1959  

222.  He who holds back rising anger like a rolling chariot, him I call a real driver; other people are but holding the reins.   Muller 1881   
222.  Whoso controls his rising anger as a running chariot, him I call the charioteer; others others only hold the reins.   Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 223     (17:223)     
223.  By calmness let a man overcome wrath.  Let him overcome evil by good.  The miser let him subdue by liberality, and the liar by truth.   Wagiswara 1912  

223.  Conquer anger by love.  Conquer evil by good.  Conquer the mean by generosity.  Conquer the liar by truth.   Narada 1959  

223.  Let a man overcome anger by love, let him overcome evil by good; let him overcome the greedy by liberality, the liar by truth!   Muller 1881   

 

 

Verse 224     (17:224)     
224.  Speak the truth, do not yield to anger; give, if thou art asked for little; by these three steps thou wilt go near the gods.   Muller 1881   

224.  One should utter the truth.  One should not be angry.  One should give what one can to him who asks.  Along these three paths, one may go
to the presence of the gods.   Narada 1959  

224.  Speak the truth, be not angry, give of thy poverty to the suppliant.  By these three virtues a man attains to the company of the gods.   Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 225     (17:225)     

225.  Those sages do not hurt others, and keep their body under self-control.  They go to the immortal Nirvana, where once gone they never grieve.   Narada 1959  

225.  The innocent, the sages, those whose action is controlled, these go to the eternal state of Nirvana where they know not sorrow.   Wagiswara 1912  
225.  The sages who injure nobody, and who always control their body, they will go to the unchangeable place  of Nirvana, where, if they have gone, 
they will suffer no more.   Muller 1881   
 
 
Verse 226     (17:226)     
226.  All taints pass away from them who are ever vigilant and active day and night, with faces set towards Nirvana.   Wagiswara 1912  
226.  Those who are ever watchful, who study day and night, and who strive after Nirvana, their passions will come to an end.   Muller 1881   

226.   Those who are ever vigilant, who discipline themselves day and night, who are wholly intent on Nirvana, their defilements are destroyed.   Narada 1959  

 

 
Verse 227     (17:227)     
227.  This is an old saying, O Atula, this is not only of to-day: `They blame him who sits silent, they blame him who speaks much, they also 
blame him who says little; there is no one on earth who is not blamed.'   Muller 1881   
227.  This is an ancient law, O Atula, not the law of a day.  Men blame the silent and they blame the talker.  Even the man of few words they blame.  No one 
in the world gets off unblamed.    Wagiswara 1912   

227.  O Atula, this is an old saying, it is not a saying of today:  "They blame those who sit silent; they blame those who speak too much; they blame those
who speak too little." No one is not blamed in this world.   Narada 1959  

 

 

Verse 228     (17:228)     

228.  There never was, there never will be nor in there now, a man who is wholly blamed and wholly praised.   Narada 1959  

228.  There never was, there never will be, nor is there now, a man who is always blamed, or a man who is always praised.   Muller 1881   
228.  There never was, nor will be, nor is there now to be found, one wholly blamed or wholly praised.    Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 229     (17:229)     
229.  But who is worthy to blame him whom the wise praise after daily scrutiny, who is himself wise and without blemish as a medal of purest 
gold?  Even the gods seek to emulate such a one; even Brahma praises him.    Wagiswara 1912 

229.  Examining day by day, the wise praises one whose life is pure, who is intelligent, endowed with knowledge and virtue.   Narada 1959  

229.  But he whom those who discriminate praise continually day after day, as without blemish, wise, rich in knowledge and virtue, who would dare to blame him, 
like a coin made of gold from the Gambu river?  Even the gods praise him, he is praised even by Brahman.   Muller 1881   
 
 
Verse 230     (17:230)     
230.  But who is worthy to blame him whom the wise praise after daily scrutiny, who is himself wise and without blemish as a medal of purest gold?  
Even the gods seek to emulate such a one; even Brahma praises him.    Wagiswara 1912 
230.  But he whom those who discriminate praise continually day after day, as without blemish, wise, rich in knowledge and virtue, who would dare to blame him, 
like a coin made of gold from the Gambu river?  Even the gods praise him, he is praised even by Brahman.   Muller 1881   

230.  One who is pure as a piece of refined gold of the Jambu River, is praised by the gods, even by Brahman.   Narada 1959  

 
 
Verse 231     (17:231)     
231.  Beware of bodily anger, and control thy body!  Leave the sins of the body, and with thy body practice virtue!   Muller 1881   

231.  One should guard against misdeeds (caused by) body, and let the body be self-controlled.  Giving up evil conduct in body, but be
of good conduct in body.   Narada 1959  

231.  Guard against evil deeds; and, control the body.  Eschew evil deeds and do good.    Wagiswara 1912    
 
 
Verse 232     (17:232)     
232.  Guard against evil words; and, control the tongue.  Eschew evil words and speak good ones.    Wagiswara 1912  
232.  Beware of the anger of the tongue, and control thy tongue!  Leave the sins of the tongue, and practice virtue with thy tongue!   Muller 1881   

232.  One should guard against misdeeds (caused by) speech, and let the speech be self-controlled.  Giving up evil conduct in speech, but be
of good conduct in speech.   Narada 1959  

 

 
Verse 233     (17:233)     

233.  One should guard against misdeeds (caused by) mind, and let mind be self-controlled.  Giving up evil conduct in mind, but be
of good conduct in mind.   Narada 1959  

233. Guard against evil thoughts; and, control the mind.  Eschew evil thoughts and think good ones.    Wagiswara 1912  
233.  Beware of the anger of the mind, and control thy mind!  Leave the sins of the mind, and practice virtue with thy mind!   Muller 1881   
 
 
Verse 234     (17:234)     
234.  The wise, controlled in act, in word, in thought, are well controlled indeed.    Wagiswara 1912   
234.  The wise who control their body, who control their tongue, the wise who control their mind, are indeed well controlled.   Muller 1881  

234.  The wise who are restrained in deed and speech are self-controlled. Those who are restrained in mind are indeed perfectly
restrained.   Narada 1959  

 

 

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Buddha Teaching

 

 

 

Dharmapada Sutra

Chapter XVIII
Impurities, Faults, Ignorance, Envy, Malavagga          

Dhammapada Sutta, Chapter 18, Verses 235-255

 

 
Verse 235     (18:235)     
235.  Thou art withered as a sere leaf.  Death's messengers await thee.  Thou standest at the gate of death, and hast made no provision for the journey.    
Wagiswara 1912  
235.  Thou art now like a sear leaf, the messengers of death (Yama) have come near to thee; thou standest at the door of thy departure, and thou hast no provision for thy journey.   Muller 1881   

235.  You are like a withered leaf now.  The messenger of death is waiting for you.  You stand on the starting point of decay.  There is no provision
for you too.   Narada 1959   

 

 

Verse 236     (18:236)     

236.  Make an island for yourself.  Strive quickly.  Be wise.  Purged of stain and free from passions, you will enter the heavenly stage of Ariyas.   Narada 1959   

236.  Make to thyself a refuge.  Come, strive and be prudent!  When thy impurities are purged, thou shalt come into the heavenly abode of the Noble.    Wagiswara 1912   
236.  Make thyself an island, work hard, be wise! When thy impurities are blown away, and thou art free from guilt, thou wilt enter into the heavenly world of the elect (Ariya).  Muller 1881   
 
 
Verse 237     (18:237)     
237.  Thy life has come to an end, thou art come near to death (Yama), there is no resting-place for thee on the road, and thou hast no provision for thy journey.   Muller 1881   
237.  Thy life is ended.  Thou art come into the Presence of Death.  There is no resting place place by the way, and thou hast no provisions for the journey.    Wagiswara 1912   

237.  Your life has come to an end now.  You are setting out to the presence of death.  There is no halting place for you by the way.  There is no provision for you too.   Narada 1959   

 
 
Verse 238     (18:238)     
238.  Make thyself an island, work hard, be wise! When thy impurities are blown away, and thou art free from guilt, thou wilt not enter again into birth and decay.   Muller 1881   

238.  Make an island for yourself.  Strive without delay.  Be wise.  Purged of stain and free from passions, you will not come again to birth and old age.   Narada 1959   

238.  Make for thyself a refuge.  Come, strive and play the sage!  Burn off thy taints, and thou shalt know birth and old age no more.    Wagiswara 1912    
 
 
Verse 239     (18:239)     
239.  As a smith purifies silver in the fire, so bit by bit continually the sage burns away his impurities.    Wagiswara 1912  
239.  Let a wise man blow off the impurities of his self, as a smith blows off the impurities of silver one by one, little by little, and from time to time.   Muller 1881   

239.  Let a wise person remove his own impurities by degrees, little by little, from time to time, just as a silversmith removes the impurities from silver.   Narada 1959   

 

 

Verse 240     (18:240)     

240.  Even as rust sprung from iron, a manís own impure transgressions lead him to the evil path.   Narada 1959   

240.  It is the iron's own rust that destroys it.  It is the sinner's own acts that bring him to hell.    Wagiswara 1912    
240.  As the impurity which springs from the iron, when it springs from it, destroys it; thus do a transgressor's own works lead him to the evil path.   Muller 1881   
 
 
Verse 241     (18:241)     
241.  Disuse is the rust of mantras.  Laziness the rust of households.  Sloth is the rust of beauty.  Neglect is the watcher's ruin.    Wagiswara 1912   
241.  The taint of prayers is non-repetition; the taint of houses, non-repair; the taint of the body is sloth; the taint of a watchman, thoughtlessness.   Muller 1881   

241.  Non-recitation is the rust of incantation; non-exertion is the rust of houses; sloth is the rust of beauty; carelessness is the rust of the watcher.   Narada 1959   

 

 

Verse 242     (18:242)     
242.  Bad conduct is the taint of woman, greediness the taint of a benefactor; tainted are all evil ways in this world and in the next.   Muller 1881   

242.  Misconduct is the taint of a woman. Meanness is the taint of a donor.  Taints, indeed, are all evil deeds both in this world and in the next.   Narada 1959   

242.  Impurity is the ruin of woman.  Avarice the ruin of the giver.  Evil deeds are the rust of this world and the next.    Wagiswara 1912   
 
 
Verse 243     (18:243)     
243.  More corrosive than those is the rust of ignorance, the greatest of taints.  Put off this rust and be clean, Bhikkhus.    Wagiswara 1912  
243.  But there is a taint worse than all taintsĖ ignorance is the greatest taint. O mendicants! throw off that taint, and become taintless!   Muller 1881   

243.  Ignorance is the worse taint and the greatest taint.  Abandoning this taint, O Bhikhus, be taintless.   Narada 1959   

 
 
Verse 244     (18:244)     
244.  Life is easy for the crafty and shameless.  For the wanton: shrewd, and impure.   Wagiswara 1912   

244.  Life seems easy for one who is shameless, impudent as a crow, back-biting, presumptuous, arrogant and corrupt.   Narada 1959   

244.  Life is easy to live for a man who is without shame, a crow hero, a mischief-maker, an insulting, bold, and wretched fellow.   Muller 1881   
 
 
Verse 245     (18:245)     

245.  Life seems hard for one who ever seeks purity, is detached and humble, is pure and reflective.   Narada 1959   

245.  But life is hard to live for a modest man, who always looks for what is pure, who is disinterested, quiet, spotless, and intelligent.   Muller 1881   
245.  Life is hard for the modest, the lover of purity, the disinterested and simple and clean, the man of insight.    Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 246     (18:246)     
246.  The murderer, the liar, the thief, the adulterer, and the drunkard these even in this world uproot themselves.    Wagiswara 1912  

246.  Whoever destroys life in this world, tells lies, takes what is not given, goes to othersí wives, and is addicted to intoxicating drinks, digs up his own
root in this world.   Narada 1959  

246.  He who destroys life, who speaks untruth, who in this world takes what is not given him, who goes to another man's wife;   Muller 1881     
 
 
Verse 247     (18:247)     

247.  Whoever destroys life in this world, tells lies, takes what is not given, goes to othersí wives, and is addicted to intoxicating drinks, digs up his
own root in this world.   Narada 1959   

247.  And the man who gives himself to drinking intoxicating liquors, he, even in this world, digs up his own root.   Muller 1881   
247.  The murderer, the liar, the thief, the adulterer, and the drunkard these even in this world uproot themselves.    Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 248     (18:248)     
248.  Know this, man, evil is the undisciplined mind!  See to it that greed and lawlessness bring not upon thee long suffering.    Wagiswara 1912  

248.  Knowing this, therefore, O man, "Difficulty in self-control is evil". Let greed curd wickedness, not drag you to protracted misery.   Narada 1959  

248.  O man, know this, that the unrestrained are in a bad state.  Take care that greediness and vice do not bring thee to grief for a long time!   Muller 1881   

 

 

Verse 249     (18:249)     

249.  People give offerings according to their faith and as they are pleased.  Whoever therein is envious of others' food and drink gains no peace
either by day or by night.   Narada 1959   

249.  The world gives according to their faith or according to their pleasure: if a man frets about the food and the drink given to others, 
he will find no rest either by day or by night.   Muller 1881   
249.  Men give according to faith or caprice.  If a man fret because food and drink are given to another, he comes not day or night to 
serene meditation (Samadhi).    Wagiswara 1912   
 
 
Verse 250     (18:250)     
250.  He in whom that feeling is destroyed, and taken out with the very root, finds rest by day and by night.   Muller 1881   
250.  He in whom this envious spirit is destroyed and wholly uprooted, he truly day and night attains serene meditation.    Wagiswara 1912  

250.  But whoever fully cuts off uprooted and destroys this feeling, gains peace by day and by night.   Narada 1959   

 
 
Verse 251     (18:251)     

251.  There is no fire like lust, no grip like hate, no net like delusion, no river like craving.   Narada 1959   

251.  There is no fire like passion, there is no shark like hatred, there is no snare like folly, there is no torrent like greed.   Muller 1881   
251.  There is no fire like lust, no ravenous beast like hatred, no snare like folly, no flood like desire.    Wagiswara 1912   
 
 
Verse 252     (18:252)     
252.  To see another's fault is easy; to see one's own is hard.  Men winnow the faults of others like chaff; their own they hide as a crafty gambler 
hides a losing throw.   Wagiswara 1912  
252.  The fault of others is easily perceived, but that of oneself is difficult to perceive.  A man winnows his neighbor's faults like chaff, but his own fault he 
hides, as a cheat hides the bad die from the gambler.   Muller 1881   

252.  It is easy to see otherís faults, but hard indeed, to see oneís own.  One shows the others faults like chaff winnowed in the wind, but one
hides oneís own faults as a cunning hunter conceals himself by camouflage.   Narada 1959   

 

 

Verse 253     (18:253)     

253.  If a man sees othersí faults, and ever thinks of their faults, his corruption grows.  He is far from the destruction of corruption.   Narada 1959    

253.  The taints of this man are ever growing.  He is far from the purification of taints, the censorious one who is ever blaming others.    Wagiswara 1912  
253.  If a man looks after the faults of others, and is always inclined to be offended, his own passions will grow, and he is far from the destruction of passions.   Muller 1881   
 
 
Verse 254     (18:254)     
254.  There is no path through the sky.  There is is no "religious" apart from us.  The world without delights in dalliance: the Blessed Ones are 
freed from this thrall.    Wagiswara 1912   
254.  There is no path through the air, a man is not a Samana by outward acts. The world delights in vanity, the Tathagatas (the Buddhas) are free from vanity.   Muller 1881   

254.  In the sky, there is no track, there is no saint to find the path outside.  Mankind delights in obstacles, but Tathgatas are free from
obstacles.   Narada 1959 

 

 

Verse 255     (18:255)     

255.  In the sky, there is no track. There is no saint to find the path outside. There are no conditional things that are eternal. There is no instability in
the Buddhas. Narada 1959 

255.  There is no path through the sky.  There is no "religious" apart from us.  Nothing in the phenomenal world is lasting; but Buddhas 
endure immovable.    Wagiswara 1912   
255.  There is no path through the air, a man is not a Samana by outward acts.  No creatures are eternal; but the awakened (Buddha) are never shaken.   Muller 1881   
 
 

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Buddha Teaching

 

 

 

Dhammapada Sutta

Chapter XIX
The Righteous, True Sages, Wise Elders, Monks, The Just, Dhammatthavagga       

Dharmapada Sutra, Chapter 19, Verses 256-272

 

 

Verse 256    (19:256)    

256.  Hasty judgment shows no man just.  He is called just who discriminates between right and wrong, who judges others not hastily, but with 
righteous and calm judgment, a wise guardian of the law.    Wagiswara 1912   
256.  A man is not just if he carries a matter by violence.  He who distinguishes both right and wrong, who is learned and leads others, not by violence, 
but by law and equity, and who is guarded by the law and intelligent, he is called just.   Muller 1881    

256.  He is not thereby righteous because he arbitrates cases hastily.  The wise man should investigate what is right and what is wrong.  
Narada 1959   

 

 

Verse 257    (19:257)    

257.  The intelligent person who leads others not falsely, but lawfully and impartially.  He is a guardian of the law, and is called one who
abides by the law.   Narada 1959   

257.  Hasty judgment shows no man just.  He is called just who discriminates between right and wrong, who judges others not hastily, 
but with righteous and calm judgment, a wise guardian of the law.    Wagiswara 1912  
257.  A man is not just if he carries a matter by violence.  He who distinguishes both right and wrong, who is learned and leads others, not by violence, 
but by law and equity, and who is guarded by the law and intelligent, he is called just.   Muller 1881    

 

 

Verse 258    (19:258)    

258.  Neither is a man wise by much speaking.  He is called wise who is forgiving, kindly, and fearless.    Wagiswara 1912  
258.  A man is not learned because he talks much.  He who is patient, free from hatred and fear, he is called learned.   Muller 1881    

258.  One is not a learned man merely because one speaks much.  One who is secure, without hate and fearless is called "learned".   Narada 1959   

 

 

Verse 259    (19:259)    

259.  A man is not a supporter of the law because he talks much.  Even if a man has learnt little, but sees the law bodily, he is a supporter of the law, a man who 
never neglects the law.   Muller 1881    
259.  A man is not a pillar of the law for his much speaking.  He who has heard only part of the law and keeps it indeed, he is a pillar of the law and 
does not slight it.    Wagiswara 1912    

259.  One is not versed in Dharma merely because one speaks too much.  One who hears little and sees the Dharmas mentally and who does not neglect
the Dharma is, indeed, versed in the Dharma.   Narada 1959   

 

 

Verse 260    (19:260)    

260.  One is not an elder merely because of his gray hair on oneís head.  A man is called "old-in-vain" if he is old only in his age.   Narada 1959   

260.  A man is not an elder because his head is grey.  His age may be ripe, but he is called `old-in-vain.'   Muller 1881    
260.  No man is made an "elder" by his grey locks.  Mere old age is called empty old age.    Wagiswara 1912  
 
 

Verse 261    (19:261)    


261.  He is called "elder" in whom dwell truth and righteousness, harmlessness and self-control and self-mastery, who is without taint and wise.    Wagiswara 1912 

261.  A wise man is a venerable "elder", if he is in truth, virtue, harmlessness, self-controlled, and purged of impurities.   Narada 1959   

261.  He in whom there is truth, virtue, love, restraint, moderation, he who is free from impurity and is wise, he is called an elder.   Muller 1881    

 

 

Verse 262    (19:262)    

262.  Not by mere eloquence or comeliness is a man a "gentleman," who is lustful, a miser, and a knave.    Wagiswara 1912   
262.  An envious greedy, dishonest man does not become respectable by means of much talking only, or by the beauty of his complexion.   Muller 1881    

262.  Not by mere eloquence, nor by handsome appearance can a man be a man, who becomes good-natured, if he is jealous, selfish and deceitful.   Narada 1959   

 

 

Verse 263    (19:263)    

263.  He in whom all this is destroyed, and taken out with the very root, he, when freed from hatred and wise, is called respectable.   Muller 1881  

263.  But he in whom these are wholly cut off, uprooted and extinct, who is wise and purged of hatred, is called good natured.   Narada 1959   

263.  But he in whom these faults are uprooted and done away, the wise and pure is called a gentleman.    Wagiswara 1912  
 
 

Verse 264    (19:264)    

264.  Not by his shaven crown is one made a "religious" who is intemperate and dishonorable.  How can he be "religious" who is full of lust and greed?    Wagiswara 1912  
264.  Not by tonsure does an undisciplined man who speaks falsehood become a Samana.  Can a man be a Samana who is still held captive by desire and greediness?   Muller 1881    

264.  Not by a shaven head, does an undisciplined man who utters lies becomes a monk.  How will one who is full of desire and greed be a monk.   Narada 1959   

 

 

Verse 265    (19:265)    

265.  He who wholly subdues evil deeds both small and grot, is called a monk because he has overcome all evil.   Narada 1959   

265.  He who puts off entirely great sins and small faults by such true religion is a man called "religious."    Wagiswara 1912  
265.  He who always quiets the evil, whether small or large, he iscalled a a quiet man (Samana), because he has quieted all evil.   Muller 1881    
 
 

Verse 266    (19:266)    

266.  Not merely by the mendicant life is a man known as a mendicant.  He is not a mendicant because he follows the law of the flesh.    Wagiswara 1912 
266.  A man is not a mendicant (Bhikshu) simply because he asks others for alms.  He who adopts the whole law is a Bhikshu, not he who only begs.   Muller 1881    

266.  He is not thereby a Bhiksu merely because he begs from others.  By following the entire code (of morality), one certainly becomes a Bhiksu
and not (merely) by such begging.   Narada 1959   

 

 

Verse 267    (19:267)    

267.  He who is above good and evil, who is chaste, who with knowledge passes through the world, he indeed is called a Bhikshu.   Muller 1881    
267.  A mendicant is above good and evil, and leads a pure life and goes circumspectly.    Wagiswara 1912  

267.  Herein he who transcends both good and evil, whose conduct is sublime, who lives with understanding in this world, he is indeed called
a Bhiksu.   Narada 1959   

 

 

Verse 268    (19:268)    

268.  Not by silence is a man a sage if he be ignorant and foolish.  He who holds as it were the balance, taking the good and rejecting the bad, 
he is the sage.  He who is sage for both worlds, he is the true sage.    Wagiswara 1912  
268.  A man is not a Muni because he observes silence, if he is foolish and ignorant.  But the wise man who, taking the balance, chooses the good and avoids evil, 
he is a Muni.  He who in this world weighs both sides is called a Muni.   Muller 1881    

268.  Not by silence (alone) does a man who is dull and ignorance becomes a sage.  That wise man who, as if holding a pair of scales, embraces
the best and shuns evil, is indeed a sage.   Narada 1959   

 

 

Verse 269    (19:269)    

269.  Not by silence is a man a sage if he be ignorant and foolish.  He who holds as it were the balance, taking the good and rejecting the bad, he is the sage.  
He who is sage for both worlds, he is the true sage.    Wagiswara 1912  

269.  For that reason he is a sage.  He who understands the two worlds is therefore called a sage.   Narada 1959   

269.  A man is not a Muni because he observes silence, if he is foolish and ignorant.  But the wise man who, taking the balance, chooses the good and avoids evil, he is a Muni.  
He who in this world weighs both sides is called a Muni.   Muller 1881    

 

 

Verse 270    (19:270)    

270.  A man is no warrior who worries living things.  By not worrying is a man called warrior.    Wagiswara 1912  
270.  A man is not an elect (Ariya) if he injures living creatures.  If a man has pity on all living creatures, therefore he is a man called 'Ariya.'   Muller 1881    

270.   He is not an Ariya (Noble) in that he harms living beings. Through his harmlessness towards all living beings, he is called an Ariya (Noble).   Narada 1959   

 

 

Verse 271    (19:271)    

271.  Not only by discipline and vows, not only by much learning, nor by meditation, nor by solitude have I won to that peace which no worldling knows.  
Rest not content with these, O Bhikkhus, until you have reached the destruction of all taints.    Wagiswara 1912  

271.   Not only by mere morality and austerities nor again by much learning, nor even by developing mental concentration, nor by secluded lodging,
nor (thinking) "I enjoy the bliss of renunciation, not resorted by the worldly matter, should you, O Bhiksu, be contented without reaching the
extinction of corruption.   Narada 1959   

271.  Not only by discipline and vows, not only by much learning, not by entering into a trance, not by sleeping alone, do I earn the happiness of release which no worldling can know. 
Bhikshu, be not confident as long as thou hast not attained the extinction of desires.  Muller 1881    

 

 

Verse 272    (19:272)    

272.  Not only by discipline and vows, not only by much learning, nor by meditation, nor by solitude have I won to that peace which no worldling knows.  
Rest not content with these, O Bhikkhus, until you have reached the destruction of all taints.    Wagiswara 1912  
272.  Not only by discipline and vows, not only by much learning, not by entering into a trance, not by sleeping alone, do I earn the happiness of release which no worldling can know. 
Bhikshu, be not confident as long as thou hast not attained the extinction of desires.  Muller 1881    

272.   Not only by mere morality and austerities nor again by much learning, nor even by developing mental concentration, nor by secluded lodging,
nor (thinking) "I enjoy the bliss of renunciation, not resorted by the worldly matter, should you, O Bhiksu, be contented without reaching the
extinction of corruption.   Narada 1959   

 

 

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Buddha
 
 

 

Dharmapada Sutra

Chapter XX
The Eightfold Path, Impermanence, Meditation, Death, The Path, Maggavagga       

Dhammapada Sutta, Chapter 20, Verses 273-289

 

 

Verse 273     (19:273)     
273.  Best of paths is the Eightfold.  The four truths are the best of truths.  Purity is the best state.  The best of men is the seer.    Wagiswara 1912  

273.  The best of the path is the Eightfold Paths.  The best of truth are the Four Noble Truths.  Non-attachment is the best of states.  The one who
sees is the best of bipeds.   Narada 1959  

273.  The best of ways is the eightfold.  The best of truths the four words.  The best of virtues passionlessness.  The best of men he who has eyes to see.   Muller 1881  
273.  Comments on Verse 273
The Noble Eightfold Path:
Right Views  
Right Aspirations  
Right Speech
Right Action
Right Livelihood
Right Effort
Right Mindfulness
Right Contemplation  
 
 
Verse 274     (19:274)     
274.  This is the way.  There is no other way that leads to the seeing of Purity [Nirvana.]  Do you follow this path?  This path fools Mara.   Wagiswara 1912   

274.  This is the only path.  There is no other path for the purity of vision.  Do follow this path.  You will confuse Mara.   Narada 1959  

274.  This is the way, there is no other that leads to the purifying of intelligence.  Go on this way!  Everything else is the deceit of Mara (The Tempter).   Muller 1881    
 
 
Verse 275     (19:275)     

275.  Entering upon that path, you will travel to the end of pain.  Having learnt to remove the thorns, I have taught you the path.   Narada 1959  

275.  If you go on this way, you will make an end of pain!  The way was preached by me, when I had understood the removal of the thorns in the flesh.   Muller 1881    
275.  Traveling by this way you'll end your grief.  This is the way I preached when I learnt to throw off my bonds.    Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 276     (19:276)     
276.  You yourself must make an effort.  The Tathagatas (Buddhas) are only preachers.  The thoughtful who enter the way are freed from the bondage of Mara.   Muller 1881    
276.  It is you who must strive.  The Blessed Ones are only preachers. They who strive and meditate are freed from Mara's bonds.    Wagiswara 1912  

276.  It is you who must make the effort.  The Tathagatas are the only teachers.  The meditative ones, who enter the path, are delivered from the
bonds of Mara.   Narada 1959  

 

 

Verse 277     (19:277)     

277.  "All conditional things are transient."  When one discerns this with wisdom, one is disgusted with suffering.  This is the path to purity.   Narada 1959  

277.  `All created things perish,' he who knows and sees this becomes passive in pain; this is the way to purity.   Muller 1881    
277.  When one sees and realizes that "all is passing," he sets loose of this world of sorrow.  This is the way of purity.    Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 278     (19:278)     
278.  When one sees and realizes that "all is sorrow," he sits free of this world of sorrow.  This is the way of purity.    Wagiswara 1912  

278.  "All conditioned things are sorrowful". When one discerns this with wisdom, one is disgusted with suffering.  This is the path to
purity.   Narada 1959  

278.  `All created things are grief and pain,' he who knows and sees this becomes passive in pain; this is the way that leads to purity.   Muller 1881    
 
 
Verse 279     (19:279)     
279.  When one sees and realizes that "all is unreal," he sits free of this world of sorrow.  This is the way of purity.    Wagiswara 1912  
279.  `All forms are unreal,' he who knows and sees this becomes passive in pain; this is the way that leads to purity.   Muller 1881    

279.  "All Dharmas are without a soul".  When one discerns this with wisdom, one is disgusted with suffering.  This is the path to purity.   Narada 1959  

 
 
Verse 280     (19:280)     
280.  He who does not rouse himself when it is time to rise, who, though young and strong, is full of sloth, whose will and thought are weak, that lazy and idle man 
will never find the way to knowledge.   Muller 1881    

280.  Though young and strong, a man does not strive when he should strive, he sinks into the idleness and lack of determination.  He will never realized
the path by wisdom as his good thoughts are depressed.   Narada 1959  

280.  He who fails to strive when it is time to strive, young and strong though he may be, slothful and enmeshed in lust, the sluggard, he never finds 
the path to wisdom.    Wagiswara 1912   
 
 
Verse 281     (19:281)     
281.  Whoso guards his tongue and controls his mind and does nothing wrong; he keeps clear these three paths, and he will achieve the way 
shown by the wise.    Wagiswara 1912   
281.  Watching his speech, well restrained in mind, let a man never commit any wrong with his body!  Let a man but keep these three roads of action clear, 
and he will achieve the way which is taught by the wise.   Muller 1881    

281.  A man should be aware of his speech and mind, and should not do any harm with his body.  Let him purify these three ways of action
and win the path realized by the sages.  Narada 1959  

 

 
Verse 282     (19:282)     

282.  Certainly, spiritual Yoga, meditation, leads to the light of wisdom.  Lack of Yoga leads to darkness.  Considering this twofold paths of gain and loss,
let the wise man conduct himself on the path that leads to light.   Narada 1959  

282.  From meditation springs wisdom.  From the neglect of meditation is the loss of wisdom.  Knowing this path of progress and decline, choose the 
way that leads to growth of wisdom.    Wagiswara 1912   
282.  Through zeal knowledge is gotten, through lack of zeal knowledge is lost.  Let a man who knows this double path of gain and loss thus place himself 
that knowledge may grow.   Muller 1881    
 
 
Verse 283     (19:283)     
283.  Cut down the jungle; and I do not mean with an axe.  For from the jungle of lust springs fear, and if you cut it down,, you will be disentangled, Bhikkhus!    
Wagiswara 1912   
283.  Cut down the whole forest of lust, not a tree only!  Danger comes out of the forest of lust.  When you have cut down both the forest of lust and its 
undergrowth, then, Bhikshus, you will be rid of the forest and free!   Muller 1881    

283.  Cut down the forest of the passions, not only real trees.  Fear and danger arises from the forest.  Cutting down both forest and brushwood of the
passions, O Bhiksu, be free from the forest.   Narada 1959  

 
 
Verse 284     (19:284)     
284.  So long as the love of man towards women, even the smallest, is not destroyed, so long is his mind in bondage, as the calf that drinks milk is to its mother.   Muller 1881    

284.  As long as the slightest brushwood of the passions of a man towards women is not cut down, so long the mind of a man is in bondage, he is bowed
like a calf tied to a cow.   Narada 1959  

284.  If the entanglement of a man with a woman is not utterly cut away, he is in bondage, running to her as a sucking calf to the cow.   Wagiswara 1912   
 
 
Verse 285     (19:285)     
285.  Pluck out the bond of self as one pulls up an autumn lotus.  Forge thy way along the path of safety, Nirvana, shown by the Blessed.    Wagiswara 1912  
285.  Cut out the love of self, like an autumn lotus, with thy hand!  Cherish the road of peace.  Nirvana has been shown by Sugata (Buddha).   Muller 1881    

285.  Cut off your affection, as though it were an autumn lily, with the hand.  Cultivate the very path of peace.  Nirvana has been expounded by the
Auspicious One.   Narada 1959  

 

 

Verse 286     (19:286)     

286.  "Here shall I live in the rainy seasons, here in autumn and in summer", the fool thinks, but he doesnít realize the danger of death.   Narada 1959  

286. Thinking that "here I will pass the wet season," or "here I will stay the winter and summer," is foolish thinking.  You are unmindful of what may 
befall you.   Wagiswara 1912  
286.  `Here I shall dwell in the rain, here in winter and summer,' thus the fool meditates, and does not think of his death.   Muller 1881    
 
 
Verse 287     (19:287)     
287.  Then comes Death and sweeps him away.  While infatuated with children and cattle, and entangled with this world's goods, the deadly flood will sweep 
away the sleeping village.   Wagiswara 1912  
287.  Death comes and carries off that man, praised for his children and flocks, his mind distracted, as a flood carries off a sleeping village.   Muller 1881    

287.  The man whose mind is set on his children and herds, is seized and carried away by death, even as a great flood sweeps away a sleeping village.   Narada 1959  

 
 
Verse 288     (19:288)     
288.  Sons are no help, nor a father, nor relations; there is no help from kinsfolk for one whom death has seized.   Muller 1881    

288.  There is no protection for the children; neither fathers nor even kinsmen.  For one who is overcome by death, no protection is to be
found among kinsmen.   Narada 1959  

288.  There is no safety in sons, or in fathers, or in kinsfolk when Death overshadows thee.  Being amongst thine own kith and kin is 
no refuge.    Wagiswara 1912   
 
 
Verse 289     (19:289)     
289.  Knowing this clearly, the wise and righteous man straightway clears the road that leads to Nirvana.    Wagiswara 1912   
289.  A wise and good man who knows the meaning of this, should quickly clear the way that leads to Nirvana.   Muller 1881   

289.  Realize this fact, let the virtuous and wise person swiftly clear the way that leads to Nirvana.   Narada 1959  

 
 
 
Chapters 1-4, Verses 1-59  
Chapters 5-8, Verses 60-115
Chapters 9-12, Verses 116-166
Chapters 13-16, Verses 167-220    
Chapters 17-20, Verses 221-289   
Chapters 21-24, Verses 290-359
Chapters 25-26, Verses 360-423  
Index to Chapters 1-26  
General Subject Index    
 
 

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Translations Included on this Webpage
 
Byrom 1976   Rendered by Thomas Byrom, 1976, 1993    0 Verses
Buddharakkhita 1985    Translated by Acharya Buddharakkhita, 1985.    0 Verses
Carter 1987   Translated by John Ross Carter and Mahinda Palihawadana, 1987    0 Verses
Cleary 1994   Translated by Thomas Cleary, 1994.   0 Verses 
Edmunds 1902   Translated by Albert J. Edmunds, 1902.    All Verses: 221-289
Fronsdal 2006   Translated by Gil Fronsdal, 2006.   0 Verses

Jung 2009   Translated by Chng Tiak Jung and Tan Chade Meng.    0 Verses  

Kaviratna 1980   Translated by Harischandra Kaviratna, 1980.   0 Verses

Maitreya 1995   Translated by Balangoda Ananda Maitreya, 1995.    0 Verses

Mascaro 1973  Translated by Juan Mascaro, 1973.   0 Verses

Muller 1881   Translated by Friedrich Max Muller, 1881.   All Verses: 221-289  

Narada 1959   Translated by Narada Maya Thera, 1959.   All Verses: 221-289 

Richards 1993    Translated by John Richards, 1993.   0 Verses 

Thanissaro 1997   Translated by Bhikku Thanissaro, 1997.    0 Verses

Wagiswara 1912   Translated by W.D.C. Wagiswara and K. L. Saunders, 1912.   All Verses: 221-289 

Wallis 2007   Translated by Glen Wallis, 2007.   0 Verses

Wannapok 1998   Translated by S. Wannapok, 1998.   0 Verses     

 

 

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