Dharmapada Sutra

Sayings of The Buddha from the Pali Tipitaka (Three Baskets) Canon, Circa 100 BCE
Siddhārtha Gautama, The Buddha (563-483 BCE)


Chapters 9-12
Verses 116-166


Compiled by

Michael P. Garofalo
September 12, 2009

 
Introduction     Bibliography     Links     Resources     Chapter Topics (1-26)     Notes     General Subject Index

Chapter 9     Chapter 10     Chapter 11     Chapter 12

Translations Included on this Webpage

 

 

 

The Buddha Teaching

 

 

 

 

 

Dhammapada Sutta

Chapter IX
Good and Evil, Avoid Evil Deeds and Do Good, Consequences of Evil Actions, Vice, Detriment, Papavagga   

Dharmapada Sutra, Chapter 9, Verses 116-128

 

 

Verse 116     (9:116)    
116.  If a man would hasten towards the good, he should keep his thought away from evil; if a man does what is good slothfully, his mind 
delights in evil.   Muller 1881  
116.  Be quick in goodness;
From wrong hold back your thought.
Indeed, of one performing the good tardily,
The mind delights in wrong.   Carter 1987

116.  Make haste in doing good and check your mind from evil.  If a man is slow in doing meritorious actions, his mind delights in evil.    Narada 1959  

116. Cling to what is right, so will you keep the mind from wrong. Whoso is slack in well-doing comes to rejoice in evil.   Wagiswara 1912 
 
 
Verse 117     (9:117)    
117.  If one offends, let him not repeat his offence; let him not set his heart upon it.  Sad is the piling up of sin.   Wagiswara 1912  
117.  If a man commits a sin, let him not do it again; let him not delight in sin: pain is the outcome of evil.   Muller 1881  

117.  Should a man commits evil, he should not do it again and again.  He should not find pleasure therein, because accumulation of
evil is painful.   Narada 1959  

 
 
Verse 118     (9:118)    
118.  If a man does something good, let him do it again and again.  Let him find joy in his good work.  Joyful is the accumulation of 
good work.   Mascaro 1773   

118.  Should a man performs a meritorious action, he should do it again and again.  He should find pleasure therein because
accumulation of merits is blissful.   Narada 1959

118.  Set your heart on doing good.
Do it over and over again,
And you will be filled with joy.    Byrom 1976 

118.  If a man does what is good, let him do it again; let him delight in it: happiness is the outcome of good.   Muller 1881 

118.  If one does well, let him repeat his well-doing: let him set his heart upon it.  Glad is the storing up of good.   Wagiswara 1912  

118.  If one should some merit make
do it again and again.
One should wish for it anew
for merit grows to joy.
Explanation: A person may do some meritorious activity.  He must keep on
repeating it, over and over.  He must take delight in that meritorious action.
Accumulation of merit leads to happiness.
The Illustrated Dhammapada 

 
Verse 118
 

 

 

Verse 119     (9:119)    

119.  Even one who is evil sees good as long as the evil has not developed, but when the evil has developed, one sees the
evil results.   Narada 1959  

119.  Even an evil-doer sees happiness as long as his evil deed has not ripened; but when his evil deed has ripened, then 
does the evil-doer see evil.   Muller 1881  
119.  The bad man sees good days, until his wrong-doing ripens; then he beholds evil days.   Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 120     (9:120)    
120.  Even a good man may see evil days till his well-doing comes to fruition; then he beholds good days.   Wagiswara 1912 

120.  Even one who is good sees evil as long as the good has not developed, but when the good has developed, one sees the
good results.   Narada 1959 

120.  Even a good man sees evil days, as long as his good deed has not ripened; but when his good deed has ripened, then 
does the good man see happy days.   Muller 1881  
 
 
Verse 121     (9:121)    
121.  Do not underestimate evil, thinking it will not affect you.  Dripping water can even fill a pitcher, drop by drop.  A fool is filled 
with evil, even if one accumulatesit little by little.   Cleary 1994  
121.  Let no man think lightly of evil, saying in his heart, It will not come nigh unto me.  Even by the falling of water-drops a water-pot 
is filled; the fool becomes full of evil, even if he gather it little by little.   Muller 1881   
121. Think not lightly of evil "It will not come nigh me."  Drop by drop the pitcher is filled: slowly yet surely the fool is saturated 
with evil.   Wagiswara 1912  

121.  Do not disregard evil, saying "It will not come close to me".  The falling of drops of water will in time fill a water jar.  Even so
the fool fills himself with evil by gathering it little by little.   Narada 1959  

 

 

Verse 122     (9:122)   

122.  Do not disregard merit, saying "It will not come close to me".  The falling of drops of water will in time fill a water jar.  Even so
the wise man fills himself with good by gathering it little by little.   Narada 1959   

122.  Think not trifling of good,
'It will not come to me!'
With falling drops of water,
Even a waterpot is filled.
A wise one is filled with good,
Acquiring bit by bit.   Carter 1987

122.  Let no man think lightly of good, saying in his heart, It will not come nigh unto me.  Even by the falling of water-drops a water-pot 
is filled; the wise man becomes full of good, even if he gather it little by little.   Muller 1881  
122. Think not lightly of evil "It will not come nigh me."  Drop by drop the pitcher is filled: slowly yet surely the fool is saturated 
with evil.   Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 123     (9:123)    
123.  A trader whose pack is great and whose caravan is small shuns a dangerous road.  A man who loves his life shuns poison.  
So do thou shun evil.   Wagiswara 1912  

123.  Just as a merchant, with a small escort but great wealth, avoids a dangerous route, let a man who desires to live avoid drinking
poison and the dangers of evil.   Narada 1959  

123.  Let a man avoid evil deeds, as a merchant, if he has few companions and carries much wealth, avoids a dangerous road; as a 
man who loves life avoids poison.   Muller 1881  
 
 
Verse 124     (9:124)    
124.  He who has no wound on his hand, may touch poison with his hand; poison does not affect one who has no wound; nor is there 
evil for one who does not commit evil.   Muller 1881  

124.  If there is no wound in ones hand, one may carry poison in it.  Poison does not affect one who has no wound.  There is no
evil for one who does none.   Narada 1959 

124.  He who has no wound can handle poison.  The unwounded hand cannot absorb it.  There is no evil to him that does 
no evil.   Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 125     (9:125)    
125.  Whoso is offended by the inoffensive man, and whoso blames an innocent man, his evil returns upon him as fine dust thrown 
against the wind.   Wagiswara 1912 

125.  If a man offend a harmless, pure, and innocent person, the evil falls back upon that fool, like light dust thrown up against 
the wind.   Muller 1881
125.  Whosoever offends a harmless person,
One pure and guiltless,
Upon that very fool the evil recoils
Even as fine dust thrown against the wind.   Wannapok 1998  

125.  If anyone offends an innocent person, the evil of that will come back to that fool, like fine dust thrown against
the wind.   Narada 1959 

 
 
Verse 126     (9:126)    

126.  Some are born in a womb.  Those who are evil are born in evil realms.  People whose conduct is good go to heaven. 
People who are free from defilement enter Nirvana.   Narada 1959   

126.  Some people are born again; evil-doers go to hell; righteous people go to heaven; those who are free from all
worldly desires attain Nirvana.   Muller 1881 

126.  Some go to the womb, some evil-doers to hell; the good go to heaven, the sinless to Nirvana.   Wagiswara 1912  
 

 

Verse 127     (9:127)   

127.  There is nowhere on earth not in the sky, nor in the sea, nor in a mountain cave, that one may escape from
the effects of ones evil deed.   Narada 1959 

127.  Not in the sky,
not in the depths of the sea,
not by entering a cleft in the mountains,
nowhere in the world can there be found
a place where one might be released
from detrimental actions.   Wallis 2007

127.  Not in the sky, not in the midst of the sea, not if we enter into the clefts of the mountains, is there known a spot 
in the whole world where death could not overcome the mortal.   Muller 1881  
127.  That spot in the world is not found,
Neither in the sky nor in the ocean's depths,
Nor having entered into a cleft in the mountains,
Where abiding, one would be released from the bad deed.   Carter 1987 
127.  Not in the sky, nor in mid-ocean, nor in a mountain cave can one find sanctuary from his 
sins.   Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 128     (9:128)    
128.  Not in the sky, not in mid-ocean, not in a mountain cave can one find release from the conquering might 
of death.   Wagiswara 1912  

128.  There is nowhere on earth not in the sky, nor in the sea, nor in a mountain cave, that one will not be
overcome by death.   Narada 1959

128.  Not in the sky, not in the midst of the sea, not if we enter into the clefts of the mountains, is there known 
a spot in the whole world where death could not overcome the mortal.   Muller 1881  
 
 

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Buddha Teaching

 

 

 

Dharmapada Sutra

Chapter X
Don't Punish or Kill, Don't Inflict Pain on Others, Avoid Violence, Overcome Desires,
Train Yourself, Evil Returns Evil, Dandavagga     

Dhammapada Sutta, Chapter 10, Verses 129-145

 

 

Verse 129     (10:129)   

129.  All men tremble at punishment, all men fear death; remember that you are like unto them, and do not kill, nor 
cause slaughter.   Muller 1881  
129. All fear the rod, all quake at death. Judge then by thyself, and forbear from slaughter, or from causing to 
slay.   Wagiswara 1912  

129.  All tremble at the rod. All fear death. Comparing others with oneself, one should neither kill nor
cause to kill.   Narada 1959   

129.  Everyone trembles at the whip, everyone is afraid of death.  Considering others as yourself, do 
not kill or promote killing.   Cleary 1994
 

 

Verse 130     (10:130)   

130.  All tremble at the rod. Life is dear to all. Comparing others with oneself, one should neither kill nor
cause to kill.   Narada 1959  

130.  All men tremble at punishment, all men love life; remember that thou art like unto them, and do not 
kill, nor cause slaughter.   Muller 1881  
130.  To all is life dear. Judge then by thyself, and forbear to slay or to cause slaughter.   Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 131     (10:131)    
131.  Whoso himself desires joy, yet hurts them who love joy, shall not obtain it hereafter.   Wagiswara 1912   

131.  Whoever, seeking his own happiness, hurts with the rod other living beings who all want happiness will
not experience happiness hereafter.   Narada 1959   

131.  He who seeking his own happiness punishes or kills beings who also long for happiness, will not find 
happiness after death.   Muller 1881  
 
 
Verse 132     (10:132)    
132.  He who seeking his own happiness does not punish or kill beings who also long for happiness, will 
find happiness after death.   Muller 1881  
132.  Whoso himself desires joy and hurts not them who love it, shall hereafter attain to peace after death.   
Wagiswara 1912   

132.  Whoever, seeking his own happiness, does not hurt other living beings who all want happiness will
experience happiness hereafter.   Narada 1959 

132.  For your brother is like you.
He wants to be happy. 
Never harm him
And when you leave this life
You too will find happiness.   Byrom 1976

 
 
Verse 133     (10:133)    
133.  Never speak harsh words, for once spoken they may return to you.  Angry words are painful and there may be 
blows for blows.   Mascaro 1773  

133.  Do not speak harsh words, because once spoken will retort to you. Angry words are painful. There may be blows
for blows that cause retaliation.   Narada 1959  

133.  Speak not harshly to any one or else men will turn upon you.  Sad are the words of strife; retribution will follow 
them.   Wagiswara 1912 
133.  Do not speak harshly to anybody; those who are spoken to will answer thee in the same way. Angry speech is 
painful, blows for blows will touch thee.   Muller 1881  
 
 
Verse 134     (10:134)    
134.  If, like a shattered metal plate (gong), thou utter not, then thou hast reached Nirvana; contention is not 
known to thee.   Muller 1881 

134.  If you keep silence like a broken gong, you have already attained Nirvana. No vindictiveness will be
found in you.   Narada 1959  

134.  Be silent as a broken gong, and so wilt thou reach peace; for strife is not found in thee.   Wagiswara 1912   
 

 

Verse 135     (10:135)   

135.  As a cowherd drives his cattle to pasture with a rod, even so do old age and death drive out the
lives of beings.   Narada 1959 

135.  As a cowherd with his staff drives his cows into the stable, so do Age and Death drive the life 
of men.   Muller 1881  
135.  As the herdsman drives out his cows to the pasture, so old age and death drive out the life 
of men.   Wagiswara 1912  

 

135.  Pi 135 [10.7] Daa

yath daena goplo
gvo pceti gocara,
eva jar ca maccu ca
yu pcenti pina.

Patna 200 [12.6] Daa

yath daena goplo
gvo prjeti gocara
eva jar ca macc ca
prin adhivattati

Udnavarga 1.17 Anitya

yath daena goplo
g prpayati gocaram
va rogair jarmtyu
yu prpayate nm

- Comparative Edition of the Dhammapada

 
 
 
Verse 136     (10:136)    
136.  Verily the fool sins and knows it not; by his own deeds is the fool tormented as by fire.   Wagiswara 1912  

136.  When a fool commits evil deeds; he does not realize that he is tormented by his own deeds, like one burnt
by fire.   Narada 1959 

136.  A fool does not know when he commits his evil deeds: but the wicked man burns by his own deeds, as 
if burnt by fire.   Muller 1881  
 
 
Verse 137     (10:137)    
137.  He who inflicts pain on innocent and harmless persons, will soon come to one of these ten states:   Muller 1881 
137.  He who strikes those who strike not and are innocent will come speedily to one of these ten states:   Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 138     (10:138)    
138.  He will have cruel suffering, loss, injury of the body, heavy affliction, or loss of mind;   Muller 1881 
138.  To cruel torment, loss, accident, severe illness, and madness he will come.   Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 139     (10:139)    
139.  To visitation from the King, grievous slander, loss of kith and kin, and perishing of his wealth he will come.   Wagiswara 1912   
139.  Or a misfortune coming from the king, or a fearful accusation, or loss of relations, or destruction of treasures;   Muller 1881  
 
 
Verse 140     (10:140)    
140.  Ravaging fire will destroy his houses, and after death the poor wretch will go to hell.   Wagiswara 1912  
140.  Or lightning-fire will burn his houses; and when his body is destroyed, the fool will go to hell.   Muller 1881   

137-140.  Whoever hurts with his rod those who are harmless, will soon come to one of these ten states: acute pain
disaster, body injury, grievous sickness, loss of mind, oppression by the king, heavy accusation, lose of relatives,
destruction of wealth, ravaging fire that will burn his house, to be born in hell when his body dissolves.   Narada 1959 

 
 
Verse 141     (10:141)    
141.  Not nakedness, not platted hair, not dirt, not fasting, or lying on the earth, not rubbing with dust, not sitting 
motionless, can purify a mortal who has not overcome desires.   Muller 1881   
141.  Neither nakedness, nor entangled hair, nor uncleanliness, nor fasting, nor sleeping on the ground, nor covering 
the body with ashes, nor ever-squatting, can purify a man who is not pure from doubts and desires.   Mascaro 1773   
141.  Not nakedness, nor matted hair, not dirt, nor fasting, not sleeping in sanctuaries, nor ashes, nor ascetic posture; 
none of these things purifies a man who is not free from doubt.   Wagiswara 1912  

141.  Neither nakedness, nor matted hair, nor filth, nor fasting, nor lying on the ground, nor dust and dirt, nor
striving squatting on the heels, can purify a mortal who has not overcome doubts and desires.   Narada 1959 

 
 
Verse 142     (10:142)    
142.  He who, though dressed in fine apparel, exercises tranquility, is quiet, subdued, restrained, chaste, and has 
ceased to find fault with all other beings, he indeed is a Brahmana, an ascetic (sramana), a friar (bhikshu).   Muller 1881  
142.  If, even though an adorned layman,
a person practices equanimity, is tranquil,
mild, restrained, living the lofty life,
he, having lain down violence
toward all sentient beings,
is a superior person, a seeker, a practitioner.   Wallis 2007

142.  Though a man may wear fine clothing, if he lives peacefully, subdues his passion, control his senses, has faith,
is perfectly pure, lays aside the rod towards all living beings, he is a Brahman, an ascetic, a monk
called Bhikkhu.   Narada 1959 

142.  In whatever he be decked,
If yet he cultivates tranquility of mind,
Is calm, controlled, certain and chaste,
And has ceased to injure all other beings,
He is indeed, a brahman, a samana, a bhikkhu.   Wannapok 1998

142.  If even a fop fosters the serene mind, calm and controlled, pious and pure, and does no hurt to any living 
thing, he is the Brahmin, he is the Samana, he is the Bhikkhu.   Wagiswara 1912 
 
 
Verse 143     (10:143)    
143.  Is there in this world any man so restrained by humility that he does not mind reproof, as a well-trained horse the whip?   Muller 1881  
143.  Is there in all the world a man so modest that he provokes no blame, as a noble steed never deserves the whip ? As a noble steed 
stung by the whip, be ye spirited and swift.   Wagiswara 1912  

143.   It is rare to find anyone in this world restrained by modesty, who avoids reproach, just as a good horse needs no whipping. (143)

 
 
Verse 144     (10:144)    
144.  By faith, by righteousness, by manliness, by meditation, by just judgment, by theory and practice, by mindfulness, leave aside 
sorrow no slight burden.   Wagiswara 1912  

144.   Like a good horse, touched by the whip, be strenuous and zealous by faith, by virtue, by effort, by concentration, by studying
the truth, by being endowed with knowledge and conduct and by being mindful, one shall get rid of this great suffering. (144)

144.  Like a good horse on whom a whip alights, be earnest and energetic.  By faith, discipline, vigor, concentration, and discernment 
of truth, expertin knowledge and action, aware, slough off this mass of misery.   Cleary 1994  
144.  Even as a thorough-bred horse once touched by the whip,
Becomes agitated and exerts himself greatly,
So be strenuous and filled with religious emotion.
By confidence, virtue, effort and concentration,
By the investigation of the Doctrine,
By being endowed with knowledge and conduct
And by keeping your mind alert,
Will you leave this great suffering behind.   Wannapok 1998 
144.  Like a well-trained horse when touched by the whip, be ye active and lively, and by faith, by virtue, by energy, by meditation, 
by discernment of the law you will overcome this great pain (of reproof), perfect in knowledge and in behavior, and never 
forgetful.   Muller 1881  
 
 
Verse 145     (10:145)    

145.   Irrigators guide water in chanelling, the fletchers make the arrows straight in bending, the carpenters control the timber
in cutting, the virtuous control themselves. (145)

145.  Well-makers lead the water wherever they like; fletchers bend the arrow; carpenters bend a log of wood; good people 
fashion themselves.   Muller 1881  
145.  Engineers control the water, fletchers fashion their shafts, carpenters shape the wood; it is themselves that the 
pious fashion and control.   Wagiswara 1912 
 
 

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Buddha Teaching

 

 

 

Dhammapada Sutta

Chapter XI
Beyond Life, Old Age, Broken Down House, Illness, Death, Jaravagga   

Dharmapada Sutra, Chapter 11, Verses 146-156


 
Verse 146     (11:146)    
146.  How is there laughter, how is there joy, as this world is always burning?  Why do you not seek a light, ye who are 
surrounded by darkness?   Muller 1881  

146.  What is laughter, what is joy, when the world is ever burning?  When you are in deep darkness, would you not
seek the light?   Narada 1959

146.  Where is the joy, what the pleasure, whilst all is in flames ? Benighted, would ye not seek a torch?   Wagiswara 1912  
 

 

Verse 147     (11:147)   

147.  Consider this beautiful body! It is a mass of sores, diseased, full of imaginations.  It is never permanent, for
ever changing.  Narada 1959

147.  Look at this painted image, wounded and swollen, sickly and full of lust, in which there is no 
permanence.  Wagiswara 1912 
147.  Look at this dressed-up lump, covered with wounds, joined together, sickly, full of many thoughts, 
which has no strength, no hold!   Muller 1881  
 
 
Verse 148     (11:148)    
148.  This wasted form is a nest of disease and very frail; it is full of putrid matter and perishes. Death is the end of life.   Wagiswara 1912  

148.  This body is decaying!  A nest of diseases, perishable.  This putrid mass breaks up.  Truly life ends in death.  Narada 1959 

148.  This body is wasted, full of sickness, and frail; this heap of corruption breaks to pieces, life indeed ends in death.   Muller 1881  
 
 
Verse 149     (11:149)    
149.  What attachment is there when one has seen these white bone as like gourds discarded in autumn?   Cleary 1994

149.  Those white bones, like gourds thrown away in the autumn, what pleasure is there in looking at them?   Muller 1881  
149.  What delight is there for him who sees these grey bones scattered like gourds in autumn?    Wagiswara 1912  

149.  Look at these grey white dried bones, like gourds cast away in autumn.  What pleasure is there in looking at them?   Narada 1959 

 
 
Verse 150     (11:150)    
150.  After a stronghold has been made of the bones, it is covered with flesh and blood, and there dwell in it old age and death, 
pride and deceit.   Muller 1881  

150.  This body is made of bones covered with flesh and blood.  Herein are stored decay, death, conceit and detraction.   Narada 1959 

150.  Here is a citadel of bones plastered with flesh and blood, and manned by old age and death, self-will and enmity.   Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 151     (11:151)    

151.  Even ornamented royal chariots wear out, so the body reaches old age too.  However, the Dharma of good virtues
never grows old.  Thus, teach the good to those who are good.   Narada 1959 

151.  Even the colorful chariots of kings age.
The body, too, grows old.
But the way of those who are good
does not grow old,
for the good teach it
to those of fine character.   Wallis 2007 

151.  The brilliant chariots of kings are destroyed, the body also approaches destruction, but the virtue of good people never 
approaches destruction,thus do the good say to the good.   Muller 1881  

151.  Splendid royal chariots wear away,
The body too comes to old age.
But the good's teaching knows not decay.
Indeed, the good teach the good in this way.   Wannapok 1998

151.  As even the king's bright chariot grows old, so the body of man also comes to old age. But the law of the holy 
never ages; the holy teach it to the holy.   Wagiswara 1912    
 

 

Verse 152     (11:152)   

152.  If a man does not learn, he grows old just like an ox!  His muscles grow, but his wisdom does not.   Narada 1959   

152.  The simpleton ages like the ox: his weight increases, but not his wisdom.   Wagiswara 1912  
152.  A man who has learnt little, grows old like an ox; his flesh grows, but his knowledge does not grow.   Muller 1881  
 
 
Verse 153     (11:153)    
153.  Looking for the maker of this tabernacle, I shall have to run through a course of many births, so long as I do not find (him); and 
painful is birth again and again.  But now, maker of the tabernacle, thou hast been seen; thou shalt not make up this tabernacle again.  
All thy rafters are broken, thy ridge-pole is sundered; the mind, approaching the Eternal (visankhara, nirvana), has attained to the 
extinction of all desires.   Muller 1881  
153. Many births have I traversed seeking the builder, in vain!  Weary is the round of births.   Wagiswara 1912  

153.  I wandered in Samsara through many a birth, seeking but not finding the builder of the house of life and death.  It is sorrowful to
be born again and again.   Narada 1959 

 
 
Verse 154     (11:154)    
154.  Now art thou seen, Builder?  Nevermore shalt thou build the house!  All thy beams are broken; cast down is thy cornerstone. 
My mind is set upon Nirvana; it has attained the extinction of desire.   Wagiswara 1912  

154.  O house-builder, you have been seen!  You will not rebuild again.  Your framing is all broken, and your ridgepole is destroyed. 
My mind has attained the unconditioned without any attachment.  The end of carving is also achieved.   Narada 1959 

154.  Looking for the maker of this tabernacle, I shall have to run through a course of many births, so long as I do not find (him); and 
painful is birth again and again.  But now, maker of the tabernacle, thou hast been seen; thou shalt not make up this tabernacle again.  
All thy rafters are broken, thy ridge-pole is sundered; the mind, approaching the Eternal (visankhara, nirvana), has attained to the 
extinction of all desires.   Muller 1881  
 
 
Verse 155     (11:155)    
155.  Men who have not observed proper discipline, and have not gained treasure in their youth, perish like old herons in a 
lake without fish.   Muller 1881  
155.  They who have not lived purely nor stored up riches in their youth, these ruefully ponder, as old herons by a lake 
without fish.   Wagiswara 1912  

155.  Those who have not led the Holy Life, and who have not acquired wealth in their youth, pine away, like old herons
at a pond without fish.   Narada 1959  

 
 
Verse 156     (11:156)    
156.  They who have not lived purely nor stored up riches in their youth, are as arrows that are shot in vain.  They they mourn 
for the past.   Wagiswara 1912  

156.  Those who have not led the Holy Life, who have not acquired wealth in their youth, lie like worn-out bows, sighing after
the past.   Narada 1959 

156.  Men who have not observed proper discipline, and have not gained treasure in their youth, lie, like broken bows, sighing 
after the past.   Muller 1881  
 

 

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Buddha
 
 

 

Dhammapada Sutta

Chapter XII
Self-Possession, Self-Control, Propriety, Duty, Oneself, The Self, Attavagga       

Dharmapada Sutra, Chapter 12, Verses 157-166

 

 

Verse 157     (12:157)   

157.  If a man hold himself dear, let him watch himself carefully; during one at least out of the three watches a wise man 
should be watchful.   Muller 1881  
157.  If a man love himself, let him diligently watch himself.  The wise will keep vigil for one of the three watches of 
the night.   Wagiswara 1912 
157.  If one would regard oneself as dear,
One would guard oneself with diligence.
The wise one would look after himself
During any one of the night's three watches.   Carter 1987

157.   If one holds oneself dear, one should protect oneself well.  Of the three watches of his times, the wise man
keeps a vigil.   Narada 1959 

 

 

Verse 158     (12:158)   

158.  Keep first thyself aright, then may thou advise others. So is the wise man unblameable.   Wagiswara 1912  

158.  Let one first establish oneself in what is proper, and then instruct others. Such a wise man will not be defiled.   Narada 1959 

158.  One should first establish oneself
In what is proper,
And then instruct others.
A wise man who acts in this way
Shall never get defiled.   Wannapok 1998 

158.  Let each man direct himself first to what is proper, then let him teach others; thus a wise man will not suffer.   Muller 1881 
 

 

Verse 159     (12:159)   

159.  If he makes himself as what he instructs others to be, then he can teach others in truth. Self-control is indeed difficult.   Narada 1959 

159.  If a man make himself as he teaches others to be, then, being himself well subdued, he may subdue (others); one's own self is indeed 
difficult to subdue.   Muller 1881  
159.  If one would make oneself as one teaches others to be, one should master self control, for the self is truly hard to tame.   Cleary 1994  
159.  If one so shapes his own life as he directs others, himself controlled, he will duly control others.  The self, they say, is hard to 
tame.   Wagiswara 1912   
 
 
Verse 160     (12:160)    
160.  Self is the lord of self, who else could be the lord?  With self well subdued, a man finds a lord such as few can find.   Muller 1881  

160.  Only a man himself can be the savior of himself, who else from outside could be his savior?  With oneself controlled, one
obtains a savior that is difficult to find.   Narada 1959  

160.  You are your only master.
Who Else?
Subdue yourself,
And discover your master.   Byrom 1976 

160.   A man is his own helper.  Who else is there to help? By self-control man is a rare help to himself.   Wagiswara 1912  
 
 
Verse 161     (12:161)    
161.  The ill that is begun and has its growth and its being in self, bruises the foolish one, as the diamond pierces its own 
matrix.   Wagiswara 1912   
161.  The evil done by oneself, self-begotten, self-bred, crushes the foolish, as a diamond breaks a precious stone.   Muller 1881  

161.  Any evil done by a man is born in himself and is caused by himself; and this crushes the unwise man as a diamond grinds
a weaker stone.   Narada 1959 

 
 
Verse 162     (12:162)    
162.  He whose wickedness is very great brings himself down to that state where his enemy wishes him to be, as a creeper 
does with the tree which it surrounds.   Muller 1881 
162.  As the creeper overpowers the tree, so he whose sin is great, works for himself the havoc his enemy would wish for him.   
Wagiswara 1912  

162.  And, a man who is exceeding corrupt, is just like a maluva creeper strangling a sal tree; and the man is brought down to that
condition in which his own enemy would wish him to be.   Narada 1959 

 
 
Verse 163     (12:163)    
163.  Bad deeds, and deeds hurtful to ourselves, are easy to do; what is beneficial and good, that is very difficult to do.   Muller 1881  

163.  It is easy to do things that are wrong and not beneficial to oneself, but is very difficult, indeed, to do things that are good and
beneficial.   Narada 1959 

163.  Ill is easy to do.  It is easy to do harm.  Hard indeed it is to do helpful and good deeds.   Wagiswara 1912   
 
 
Verse 164     (12:164)    
164.  The foolish man who scorns the rule of the venerable (Arahat), of the elect (Ariya), of the virtuous, and follows false doctrine, 
he bears fruit to his own destruction,like the fruits of the Katthaka reed.   Muller 1881  
164.  Whoso fondly repudiates the teaching of the noble and virtuous Arahats, following false doctrine, is like the bamboo which 
bears fruit to its own destruction.   Wagiswara 1912 
164.  The kashta reed dies when it bears fruit.
So the fool,
Scorning the teachings of the awakened,
Spurning those who follow the law,
Perishes when his folly flowers.   Bryom 1976

164.  On account of his false views, the stupid man scorns the teachings of the Arhats, the Nobles Ones, and the Righteous.  He gathers
fruits for his destruction, like the Kashta reed whose fruits mean its death.   Narada 1959 

 
 
Verse 165     (12:165)    
165.  Thou art brought low by the evil thou hast done thyself; by the evil thou hast left undone art thou purified. Purity and 
impurity are things of man's inmost self; no man can purify another.   Wagiswara 1912  
165.  Be oneself is damage don:
by oneself is one defiled.
By oneself is damage not done:
by onself one is purified.
Purity and impurity come from onself.
No one can purify another.   Wallis 2007

165.  By oneself the evil is done, and it is oneself who suffers: by oneself the evil is not done, and by ones self one becomes pure. 
Purity and impurity depend on oneself.  No one can purify another.   Narada 1959 

165.  By oneself is wrong done,
By oneself is one defiled.
By oneself wrong is not done,
By oneself, surely, is one cleansed.
One cannot purify another;
Purity and impurity are in oneself.   Carter 1987

165.  By oneself the evil is done, by oneself one suffers; by oneself evil is left undone, by oneself one is purified. Purity 
and impurity belong to oneself, no one can purify another.   Muller 1881 
 

 

Verse 166     (12:166)   

166.  For the sake of others welfare, let one do not neglect ones own welfare, no matter how great. Clearly perceiving ones own
welfare, let one be intent on ones own goal.   Narada 1959

166.  Let no man endanger his duty, the good of his soul, for the good of another, however great.  When he has seen the good of 
his soul, let him follow it with earnestness.  Mascaro 1973
166.  Your work is to discover your work
And then with all your heart
To give yourself to it.   Byrom 1976  
166.  Even for great benefit to another let no man imperil his own benefit.  When he has realized what is for his own good, let him 
pursue that earnestly.   Wagiswara 1912  

166.  Let no one forget his own duty for the sake of another's, however great; let a man, after he has discerned his own duty, be 
always attentive to his duty.   Muller 1881   
 
 
 
Chapters 1-4, Verses 1-59  
Chapters 5-8, Verses 60-115
Chapters 9-12, Verses 116-166
Chapters 13-16, Verses 167-220    
Chapters 17-20, Verses 221-289   
Chapters 21-24, Verses 290-359
Chapters 25-26, Verses 360-423  
Index to Chapters 1-26  
General Subject Index    
 

 

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Buddha
 
 
 
Translations Included on this Webpage
 
Byrom 1976   Rendered by Thomas Byrom, 1976, 1993    4 Verses 
Buddharakkhita 1985    Translated by Acharya Buddharakkhita, 1985.    0 Verses  
Carter 1987   Translated by John Ross Carter and Mahinda Palihawadana, 1987    4 Verses  
Cleary 1994   Translated by Thomas Cleary, 1994.   4 Verses  
Edmunds 1902   Translated by Albert J. Edmunds, 1902.   All Verses: 116-166
Fronsdal 2006   Translated by Gil Fronsdal, 2006.    0 Verses 

Jung 2009   Translated by Chng Tiak Jung and Tan Chade Meng.    0 Verses   

Kaviratna 1980   Translated by Harischandra Kaviratna, 1980.    0 Verses 

Maitreya 1995   Translated by Balangoda Ananda Maitreya, 1995.   0 Verses 

Mascaro 1973  Translated by Juan Mascaro, 1973.   4 Verses 

Muller 1881   Translated by Friedrich Max Muller, 1881.   All Verses: 116-166 

Narada 1959   Translated by Narada Maya Thera, 1959.   All Verses: 116-166 

Richards 1993    Translated by John Richards, 1993.   4 Verses

Thanissaro 1997   Translated by Bhikku Thanissaro, 1997.    0 Verses 

Tin 1986   Translated by Daw Mya Tin, 1986.  0 Verses. 

Wagiswara 1912   Translated by W.D.C. Wagiswara and K. L. Saunders, 1912.   All Verses: 116-166 

Wallis 2007   Translated by Glen Wallis, 2007.    4 Verses 

Wannapok 1998   Translated by S. Wannapok, 1998.   4 Verses     

 
 

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Green Way Research, Valley Spirit Center, Red Bluff, California, 2009
Green Way Research has been online on the WWW since 1996

This webpage was first posted on the Internet on August 16, 2009. 

 

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